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You searched for subject:(overwater structures). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Washington

1. Munsch, Stuart Harold. Fish Ecology Along Modified Shorelines.

Degree: PhD, 2017, University of Washington

Waterfronts are busy places. Ancient civilizations often formed along the water where people benefited from aquatic resources and trade. People have continued to develop waterfronts, and these areas are now major components of the global economy. They support not only international trade, but a diversity of local industries such as tourism and transportation. Waterfront development is occurring globally as the human population grows and increasingly locates in coastal settings. People have modified shorelines to support societal functions of waterfronts. These modifications have eliminated, restructured, and shaded shallow waters, which is concerning because many species of fish use shallow areas along shore, often during juvenile stages. Fish and their associated nearshore ecosystems often contribute to the value of waterfronts to people because they are culturally and economically significant. Thus, people and fish share waterfronts, and people will benefit by protecting nearshore ecosystems and the fish habitats that they support. In this dissertation, I examined effects of shoreline modifications (e.g., seawalls, piers) on fish and elucidated their natural history. The first three chapters are parts of a study that assessed fish habitat in Elliott Bay, WA. Our findings informed habitat rehabilitation along its urbanized shoreline as part of a seawall reconstruction. My participation in this study and the literature I read to prepare for my General Examination interested me in the behavior and habitat use of nearshore fish in Puget Sound. Therefore, in the fourth and fifth chapters, I assembled and analyzed data on fish behavior collected by the Wetland Ecosystem Team over the past decade throughout Puget Sound, WA. Following this work, I was interested in understanding how shoreline modifications affect fish habitats globally. I therefore wrote the sixth chapter to synthesize the current primary literature examining effects of shoreline modifications on estuarine fish and discuss how we can improve fish habitats along shore within constraints of human uses. In Chapter One, I quantified effects of seawalls and piers on fish assemblages and juvenile salmon feeding behavior in Elliott Bay. I found that (1) the composition of fish assemblages varied between (a) sites modified by seawalls and piers and (b) built beaches without piers, (2) fish abundances were lower in shaded areas under piers relative to sunlit areas, which also affected assemblage composition under piers, and (3) feeding behavior of juvenile Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) was lower under piers relative to sunlit areas. In Chapter Two, I compared subtidal fish and crab assemblages between sites modified by intertidal seawalls and built beaches. I found that (1) the composition of fish assemblages varied between seawall sites and beaches and (2) species that selected for a substrate type (e.g., sand, rocks) often contributed to compositional differences. In Chapter Three, I compared the diets of juvenile Pacific salmon between seawall shorelines… Advisors/Committee Members: Simenstad, Charles A (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Armoring; Coastal Squeeze; Estuaries; Fish nurseries; Habitat; Overwater structures; Aquatic sciences; Biology; Zoology; fisheries

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APA (6th Edition):

Munsch, S. H. (2017). Fish Ecology Along Modified Shorelines. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/38139

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Munsch, Stuart Harold. “Fish Ecology Along Modified Shorelines.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed April 17, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/38139.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Munsch, Stuart Harold. “Fish Ecology Along Modified Shorelines.” 2017. Web. 17 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Munsch SH. Fish Ecology Along Modified Shorelines. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2017. [cited 2021 Apr 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/38139.

Council of Science Editors:

Munsch SH. Fish Ecology Along Modified Shorelines. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/38139

2. Szypulski, E. Jhanek. Ecological Effects of Overwater Structures on Subtidal Kelp, Northern Puget Sound, Washington.

Degree: MS, Cultural and Environmental Resource Management, 2018, Central Washington University

There are more than 9,000 overwater structures in the Puget Sound casting an estimated 9 km2 of anthropogenic created shade to the seafloor. Subtidal kelp, over 20 species in total, are abundant in the Sound but little data exists on how they are impacted by these overwater structures. The purpose of this research is to quantify various overwater structures’ impacts on the productivity and distribution of subtidal kelp beds and to create a subtidal kelp monitoring protocol. Three sets of floating docks and paired controls were sampled twice during the summer of 2017 for subtidal kelp distribution, biomass, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), substrate, and fish presence. Georeferenced benthic video surveys were conducted along parallel transects to create 1 m grid cell maps encoded for subtidal kelp presence/absence at each site. Wet biomass and morphometric measurements were taken from kelp collected from 30 samples at each site. Light extinction coefficients were calculated using an array of 11 PAR sensors deployed at various depths and distances from each dock and within each paired control site. Substrate samples were analyzed for organic content and particle size distributions. Proportional coverages and densities of subtidal kelp were statistically compared for significant differences between the docks and their paired control sites and were correlated with related environmental conditions using nonparametric tests. Overall, subtidal kelp distribution and productivity were negatively related to dock presence. Significantly less kelp presence by transect was found at every dock site (medians = 0 – 20.4%) than paired controls (medians = 96.2 – 100%), as well as significantly less kelp biomass (dock medians = 0 – 199.6 g; control medians = 282.1 – 565.9 g), while available PAR was found to be less on the north of the docks (means = 26.2 – 193.4 µmol m-2 s-1) than paired controls (means = 58.2 – 219.0 µmol m-2 s-1) in all but one case. PAR appears to be the limiting environmental factor to kelp distribution and productivity while sediment size and percent organics do not appear to play a significant role. Advisors/Committee Members: Anthony Gabriel, Cinde Donoghue, Mary E. Poulson.

Subjects/Keywords: Kelp; Puget Sound; Light Attenuation; Overwater Structures; Video Georeferenced Survey; Subtidal; Environmental Sciences; Natural Resources and Conservation; Physical Sciences and Mathematics

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Szypulski, E. J. (2018). Ecological Effects of Overwater Structures on Subtidal Kelp, Northern Puget Sound, Washington. (Masters Thesis). Central Washington University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/etd/1052

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Szypulski, E Jhanek. “Ecological Effects of Overwater Structures on Subtidal Kelp, Northern Puget Sound, Washington.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Central Washington University. Accessed April 17, 2021. https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/etd/1052.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Szypulski, E Jhanek. “Ecological Effects of Overwater Structures on Subtidal Kelp, Northern Puget Sound, Washington.” 2018. Web. 17 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Szypulski EJ. Ecological Effects of Overwater Structures on Subtidal Kelp, Northern Puget Sound, Washington. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Central Washington University; 2018. [cited 2021 Apr 17]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/etd/1052.

Council of Science Editors:

Szypulski EJ. Ecological Effects of Overwater Structures on Subtidal Kelp, Northern Puget Sound, Washington. [Masters Thesis]. Central Washington University; 2018. Available from: https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/etd/1052


University of Washington

3. Doersch, Krista. Pier Pressure: Addressing Ecological Opportunities of Nearshore Infrastructure in Lake Washington’s Union Bay.

Degree: 2021, University of Washington

Along much of Seattle’s freshwater shorelines, seemingly isolated problems like erosion and shading are compounded and repeated by docks, piers, and houseboats. This results in a much bigger ecological problem: the erasure of the critical nearshore habitat that supports all life in the lake. What innovations in nearshore infrastructure design can provide multifunctional benefits for people and the environment? This design thesis considers the existing conditions of five representative zones along the University of Washington’s waterfront. Insights from restoration ecologists, engineers, local experts, and trends in aquatic infrastructure inform the design of this urban site. Pier Pressure proposes holistic solutions through a systems approach that enhances built interventions through ecological design. Advisors/Committee Members: Rottle, Nancy (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: aquatic recreation; ecological design; nearshore lake habitat; overwater structures; shoreline armoring; UW waterfront; Landscape architecture; Landscape architecture

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Doersch, K. (2021). Pier Pressure: Addressing Ecological Opportunities of Nearshore Infrastructure in Lake Washington’s Union Bay. (Thesis). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/46820

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Doersch, Krista. “Pier Pressure: Addressing Ecological Opportunities of Nearshore Infrastructure in Lake Washington’s Union Bay.” 2021. Thesis, University of Washington. Accessed April 17, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/46820.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Doersch, Krista. “Pier Pressure: Addressing Ecological Opportunities of Nearshore Infrastructure in Lake Washington’s Union Bay.” 2021. Web. 17 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Doersch K. Pier Pressure: Addressing Ecological Opportunities of Nearshore Infrastructure in Lake Washington’s Union Bay. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Washington; 2021. [cited 2021 Apr 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/46820.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Doersch K. Pier Pressure: Addressing Ecological Opportunities of Nearshore Infrastructure in Lake Washington’s Union Bay. [Thesis]. University of Washington; 2021. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/46820

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.