Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:(organisational heritage identity). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters

1. Pidcock, Leslie G. Organisationa heritage: exploring effects on employee outcomes and perceptions of organisational attractiveness.

Degree: 2017, Cranfield University

This research study is one of the first to explore how Organisational Heritage may affect employees and potential employees. It examines employee outcomes that may be related to heritage and provides insight into the effect heritage can have on potential employees’ perception of organisational attractiveness. The first part of the study focused on heritage characteristics and employees of a Corporate Heritage Brand (CHB). In-depth interviews were conducted with employees of a Canadian CHB to determine if heritage was a significant organisational identity characteristic, to establish which employee outcomes it was likely to influence and to explore the effects it had on the outcomes being identified. Results suggested that heritage characteristics are a distinct part of the organisational identity (the organisational heritage identity) which may positively affect organisational identification, organisational affective commitment, employee engagement, organisational pride and intent to stay. Heritage also appeared to diminish the negative impact of transformational organisational change on employee outcomes. A model is presented that summarizes the findings. The second study used the repertory grid technique to determine the characteristics that a sample of potential employees used to differentiate between employer organisations which included CHB and non-CHB companies. Honey’s content analysis was used to ascertain which of these characteristics positively affect perceptions of organisational attractiveness. The study looked specifically at heritage as an organisational characteristic. The results identified nine characteristics, including heritage, which potential employees use to differentiate amongst employer organisations. Another set of nine characteristics were found to be strongly aligned with organisational attractiveness. Four characteristics were common to both groups, and importantly heritage was a part of these. A matrix is presented that categorises organisational characteristics on two dimensions: potential for differentiation and alignment with organisational attractiveness. Four types of characteristics were defined in the matrix: Key Organisational Identity (KOICs) – high differentiation, high attractiveness, Hygiene – low differentiation, high attractiveness, Differentiator – high differentiation, low attractiveness and Low Value – low differentiation, low attractiveness. Heritage was categorized as a KOIC. The discussion suggests heritage can be key to increasing perceptions of organisational attractiveness and organisational identification. Employer branding can be proactively used to convey the organisational heritage. In general, employer branding efforts to communicate key organisational identity and hygiene characteristics to potential employees can increase the likelihood of inclusion in the potential employees’ employer consideration set. Overall, this research contributes to our increased understanding of heritage in an organisational setting. Specifically, it is one of the first academic…

Subjects/Keywords: Organisational heritage; corporate heritage brand; organisational heritage identity; organisational attactiveness; organisational identification; organisational affective commitment; employee engagement; organisational pride; consideration set; employer brand; repertory grid technique; Honey's content analysis

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pidcock, L. G. (2017). Organisationa heritage: exploring effects on employee outcomes and perceptions of organisational attractiveness. (Thesis). Cranfield University. Retrieved from http://dspace.lib.cranfield.ac.uk/handle/1826/14317

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pidcock, Leslie G. “Organisationa heritage: exploring effects on employee outcomes and perceptions of organisational attractiveness.” 2017. Thesis, Cranfield University. Accessed October 24, 2020. http://dspace.lib.cranfield.ac.uk/handle/1826/14317.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pidcock, Leslie G. “Organisationa heritage: exploring effects on employee outcomes and perceptions of organisational attractiveness.” 2017. Web. 24 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Pidcock LG. Organisationa heritage: exploring effects on employee outcomes and perceptions of organisational attractiveness. [Internet] [Thesis]. Cranfield University; 2017. [cited 2020 Oct 24]. Available from: http://dspace.lib.cranfield.ac.uk/handle/1826/14317.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Pidcock LG. Organisationa heritage: exploring effects on employee outcomes and perceptions of organisational attractiveness. [Thesis]. Cranfield University; 2017. Available from: http://dspace.lib.cranfield.ac.uk/handle/1826/14317

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Cranfield University

2. Pidcock, Leslie G. Organisational heritage : exploring effects on employee outcomes and perceptions of organisational attractiveness.

Degree: PhD, 2017, Cranfield University

This research study is one of the first to explore how Organisational Heritage may affect employees and potential employees. It examines employee outcomes that may be related to heritage and provides insight into the effect heritage can have on potential employees' perception of organisational attractiveness. The first part of the study focused on heritage characteristics and employees of a Corporate Heritage Brand (CHB). In-depth interviews were conducted with employees of a Canadian CHB to determine if heritage was a significant organisational identity characteristic, to establish which employee outcomes it was likely to influence and to explore the effects it had on the outcomes being identified. Results suggested that heritage characteristics are a distinct part of the organisational identity (the organisational heritage identity) which may positively affect organisational identification, organisational affective commitment, employee engagement, organisational pride and intent to stay. Heritage also appeared to diminish the negative impact of transformational organisational change on employee outcomes. A model is presented that summarizes the findings. The second study used the repertory grid technique to determine the characteristics that a sample of potential employees used to differentiate between employer organisations which included CHB and non-CHB companies. Honey's content analysis was used to ascertain which of these characteristics positively affect perceptions of organisational attractiveness. The study looked specifically at heritage as an organisational characteristic. The results identified nine characteristics, including heritage, which potential employees use to differentiate amongst employer organisations. Another set of nine characteristics were found to be strongly aligned with organisational attractiveness. Four characteristics were common to both groups, and importantly heritage was a part of these. A matrix is presented that categorises organisational characteristics on two dimensions: potential for differentiation and alignment with organisational attractiveness. Four types of characteristics were defined in the matrix: Key Organisational Identity (KOICs) - high differentiation, high attractiveness, Hygiene - low differentiation, high attractiveness, Differentiator - high differentiation, low attractiveness and Low Value - low differentiation, low attractiveness. Heritage was categorized as a KOIC. The discussion suggests heritage can be key to increasing perceptions of organisational attractiveness and organisational identification. Employer branding can be proactively used to convey the organisational heritage. In general, employer branding efforts to communicate key organisational identity and hygiene characteristics to potential employees can increase the likelihood of inclusion in the potential employees' employer consideration set. Overall, this research contributes to our increased understanding of heritage in an organisational setting. Specifically, it is one of the first academic…

Subjects/Keywords: Organisational heritage; corporate heritage brand; organisational heritage identity; organisational attactiveness; organisational identification; organisational affective commitment; employee engagement; organisational pride; consideration set; employer brand; repertory grid technique; Honey's content analysis

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pidcock, L. G. (2017). Organisational heritage : exploring effects on employee outcomes and perceptions of organisational attractiveness. (Doctoral Dissertation). Cranfield University. Retrieved from http://dspace.lib.cranfield.ac.uk/handle/1826/14317 ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.783257

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pidcock, Leslie G. “Organisational heritage : exploring effects on employee outcomes and perceptions of organisational attractiveness.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Cranfield University. Accessed October 24, 2020. http://dspace.lib.cranfield.ac.uk/handle/1826/14317 ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.783257.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pidcock, Leslie G. “Organisational heritage : exploring effects on employee outcomes and perceptions of organisational attractiveness.” 2017. Web. 24 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Pidcock LG. Organisational heritage : exploring effects on employee outcomes and perceptions of organisational attractiveness. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Cranfield University; 2017. [cited 2020 Oct 24]. Available from: http://dspace.lib.cranfield.ac.uk/handle/1826/14317 ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.783257.

Council of Science Editors:

Pidcock LG. Organisational heritage : exploring effects on employee outcomes and perceptions of organisational attractiveness. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Cranfield University; 2017. Available from: http://dspace.lib.cranfield.ac.uk/handle/1826/14317 ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.783257


University of Waikato

3. Smith, Mark Samuel. Using the Past: Learning Histories, Public Histories and Possibilities .

Degree: 2016, University of Waikato

This thesis explores the contemporary meaning of history and the relevance of history, historical knowledge and historical methodology for organisations. This research does so through a novel adaptation of a consulting methodology, the ‘Learning History Approach’, to understand what individuals and communities say and do about history. Using the Past addresses two interconnected questions: how have the organisations selected for study utilised their pasts; and what can the learning history approach bring to the historical discipline? Through those questions this research explores historical consciousness at three New Zealand organisations and evaluates the potential of a new method of public history. This thesis sits at the intersection of interdisciplinary research on historical consciousness, public history and ‘learning histories’ from organisational studies. This research shows how an adaptation of the original learning history methodology can both fit within and challenge the conceptual frameworks of public history. Raising historical consciousness and engaging more people with the historical discipline is vital for the health of the historical discipline. Work by researchers such as Wineburg has shown that while ‘historical thinking’ is beneficial, it is also difficult, ‘unnatural’ and uncommon – therefore new ways to disseminate such thinking and expand participatory historical culture must be developed. This research shows the learning history approach to be an effective means of expanding participatory historical culture. This is because the approach draws participants into reflective and often transformational conversations about historiographical issues such as historical community and heritage. This study finds organisational uses of history to be strongly associated with the performance and maintenance of identity. The research also reveals evidence that the past is still with us and that heritage and history are entangled. This research demonstrates the continuity of history and the utility of history for organisations, as well as the potential of the learning history approach. Ultimately, this work reflects the need to build a more participatory historical culture and the active role of academic, professional historians in realising that culture. Advisors/Committee Members: Weston, Rowland (advisor), McKie , David (advisor), Byrnes, Giselle (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Learning History; Public History; History; Historical consciousness; Historical methodology; Learning History Approach; Methodological innovation; Organisational Studies; New Zealand; Waikato; Interdisciplinary; Historical thinking; Reflexivity; Participatory historical culture; Historical community; Heritage; Identity; Southwell; Southwell School; Woodlands; Waikato Health Memorabilia Trust; WHMT; History Wars; Jointly told tale; Social Turn; Historiography; Historical Discipline

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Smith, M. S. (2016). Using the Past: Learning Histories, Public Histories and Possibilities . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Waikato. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/9936

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Smith, Mark Samuel. “Using the Past: Learning Histories, Public Histories and Possibilities .” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Waikato. Accessed October 24, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10289/9936.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Smith, Mark Samuel. “Using the Past: Learning Histories, Public Histories and Possibilities .” 2016. Web. 24 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Smith MS. Using the Past: Learning Histories, Public Histories and Possibilities . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Waikato; 2016. [cited 2020 Oct 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10289/9936.

Council of Science Editors:

Smith MS. Using the Past: Learning Histories, Public Histories and Possibilities . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Waikato; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10289/9936

.