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You searched for subject:(odor profile). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Francis, Vanquilla Shellman. The Identification of Volatile Organic Compounds from Synthetic Cathinone Derivatives for the Development of Odor Mimic Training Aids.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry, 2017, Florida International University

Methylone, Ethylone, Methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), and α-Pyrrolidinopentiophenone (α-PVP) collectively referred to as bath salts are a new trend of illicit substances known as synthetic cathinones. Designed by chemically modifying the core structure of the compound cathinone, synthetic cathinones became prevalent within the United States around the mid-2000s. As a cheap and less controlled alternative to methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy), it has become heavily abused, prompting emergency scheduling by federal regulators. Although regulations have been placed to halt incoming traffic of these drugs, lack of ground efforts still leave a large percentage of bath salts available. This study is two-fold, as it seeks to develop an extraction method for the development of Volatile Organic Compound profiles associated with various synthetic cathinones; and also determine the odorant used for canine recognition. The initial goal of this dissertation was to develop an extraction method to characterize various cathinone derivatives. The present study concluded that by employing a Polydimethylsiloxane Divinylbenzene (PDMS/DVB) coated fiber along with complimentary soft ionization techniques, the volatile components and all parent drugs could be identified within sixteen synthetic cathinone cases. The second goal of the dissertation was to assess and enhance the detection capabilities of narcotic detection teams. Canine field detection is routinely used to stop the increasing distribution influx of drugs into the United States that go undetected by standard procedures currently employed. Although currently canines can detect a multitude of drugs including heroin, cocaine, MDMA, and methamphetamine; this study revealed that more than ten canine teams (throughout south Florida) were not able to detect the presence of synthetic cathinones with current training material. While concerns have grown concerning the safety and reliability of canines being trained on various illicit substances, this research aimed to develop a safe, efficient, controlled alternative to training any canine for detection in the form of a Controlled Mimic Permeation System (COMPS). Field examination concluded that 3,4-methylenedioxypriophenone was the odorant responsible for the canine recognition of the cathinone derivative odor. Therefore a mimic training aid was developed and deployed within the field to enhance the detection capabilities of various canine teams. Advisors/Committee Members: Kenneth G. Furton, Norman Munroe, John Berry, Watson Lees, Anthony DeCaprio.

Subjects/Keywords: synthetic cathinones; bath salts; synthetic drugs; headspace; odor profile; SPME; drug detection; canine; Controlled Odor Mimic Permeation System; mimic training aids; Analytical Chemistry; Chemistry

…3,4methylenedioxypriophenone was the odorant responsible for the canine recognition of the cathinone derivative odor… …37 2.6 Controlled Odor Mimic Permeation System… …90 Optimization of the Controlled Odor Mimic Permeation System for Synthetic 4.6… …169 5.4.2 Novel Odor Introduction… …175 VOC Isolation for Development of a Controlled Odor Mimic Permeation 5.5 System… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Francis, V. S. (2017). The Identification of Volatile Organic Compounds from Synthetic Cathinone Derivatives for the Development of Odor Mimic Training Aids. (Doctoral Dissertation). Florida International University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/3370 ; 10.25148/etd.FIDC001965 ; FIDC001965

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Francis, Vanquilla Shellman. “The Identification of Volatile Organic Compounds from Synthetic Cathinone Derivatives for the Development of Odor Mimic Training Aids.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Florida International University. Accessed August 08, 2020. https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/3370 ; 10.25148/etd.FIDC001965 ; FIDC001965.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Francis, Vanquilla Shellman. “The Identification of Volatile Organic Compounds from Synthetic Cathinone Derivatives for the Development of Odor Mimic Training Aids.” 2017. Web. 08 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Francis VS. The Identification of Volatile Organic Compounds from Synthetic Cathinone Derivatives for the Development of Odor Mimic Training Aids. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Florida International University; 2017. [cited 2020 Aug 08]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/3370 ; 10.25148/etd.FIDC001965 ; FIDC001965.

Council of Science Editors:

Francis VS. The Identification of Volatile Organic Compounds from Synthetic Cathinone Derivatives for the Development of Odor Mimic Training Aids. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Florida International University; 2017. Available from: https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/3370 ; 10.25148/etd.FIDC001965 ; FIDC001965


Virginia Tech

2. Worley, Jennifer Lee. Evaluation of Dechlorinating Agents and Disposable Containers for Odor Testing of Drinking Water.

Degree: MS, Environmental Engineering, 1999, Virginia Tech

As the bottled water trend continues to rise across the nation, drinking water utilities have become more concerned with ensuring consumer satisfaction of their product. Although public water supplies are safeguarded by regulations, aesthetically unappealing taste-and-odor problems have led consumers to search for alternative water sources, such as bottled water or tap water processed by point-of-use filters. Consequently, taste-and-odor monitoring has become important to the drinking water industry. Because many utilities use chlorine to disinfect the water, chlorine odor often masks other more subtle odors that may eventually cause consumer complaints. As treated water travels from the water treatment plant to the consumer, chlorine residual diminishes and may reveal a water's naturally less-pleasing odors. Consequently, odor monitoring at the water treatment plant, where chlorine concentrations are at a peak, may not identify potential displeasing smells. Proper evaluation of these odor-causing substances requires that the chlorine odor first be eliminated before evaluating any remaining odors. Dechlorinating agents can remove chlorine, but some will produce other unwanted odors or even remove certain odorous compounds. This research describes the efficiency of several of these agents (ascorbic acid, hydrogen peroxide, oxalic acid, sodium nitrite, and sodium thiosulfate) in dechlorinating chlorinated solutions of the earthy-smelling compound geosmin and musty-smelling MIB. Interfering odors in reusable containers pose another problem in drinking water odor analysis. The most common odor-analysis methods (TON and FPA) involve the use of glass flasks, which often either develop chalky odors or have persistent lingering odors from previous evaluations. Furthermore the glass flasks break easily and are difficult to clean. This research also evaluates the suitability of four types of disposable plastic containers for odor analyses. Advisors/Committee Members: Dietrich, Andrea M. (committeechair), Hoehn, Robert C. (committee member), Duncan, Susan E. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: drinking water; sensory analysis; plastic cups; flavor profile analysis; dechlorination; geosmin; taste and odor

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Worley, J. L. (1999). Evaluation of Dechlorinating Agents and Disposable Containers for Odor Testing of Drinking Water. (Masters Thesis). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/9764

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Worley, Jennifer Lee. “Evaluation of Dechlorinating Agents and Disposable Containers for Odor Testing of Drinking Water.” 1999. Masters Thesis, Virginia Tech. Accessed August 08, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/9764.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Worley, Jennifer Lee. “Evaluation of Dechlorinating Agents and Disposable Containers for Odor Testing of Drinking Water.” 1999. Web. 08 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Worley JL. Evaluation of Dechlorinating Agents and Disposable Containers for Odor Testing of Drinking Water. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Virginia Tech; 1999. [cited 2020 Aug 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/9764.

Council of Science Editors:

Worley JL. Evaluation of Dechlorinating Agents and Disposable Containers for Odor Testing of Drinking Water. [Masters Thesis]. Virginia Tech; 1999. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/9764

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