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You searched for subject:(numerical magnitude representation). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Western Ontario

1. Holloway, Ian Douglas. Symbolizing Number: fMRI investigations of the semantic, auditory, and visual correlates of Hindu-Arabic numerals.

Degree: 2012, University of Western Ontario

Humans are born with a sensitivity to numerical magnitude. In literate cultures, these numerical intuitions are associated with a symbolic notation (e.g..Hindu-Arabic numerals). While a growing body of neuroscientific research has been conducted to elucidate commonalities between symbolic (e.g. Hinud-Arabic numerals) and non-symbolic (e.g. arrays of objects) representations, relatively little is known about the neural correlates specific to the symbolic processing of numerical magnitude. To address this, I conducted the three fMRI experiments contained within this thesis to characterize the neuroanatomical correlates of the auditory, visual, audiovisual, and semantic processing of numerical symbols. In Experiment 1, the neural correlates of symbolic and non-symbolic number were contrasted to reveal that the left angular and superior temporal gyri responded specifically to numerals, while the right posterior superior parietal lobe only responded to non-symbolic arrays. Moreover, the right intraparietal sulcus (IPS) was activated by both formats. The results reflect divergent encoding pathways that converge upon a common representation across formats. In Experiment 2, the neural response to Hindu-Arabic numerals and Chinese numerical ideographs was recorded in individuals who could read both notations and a control group who could read only the numerals. A between-groups contrast revealed semantic processing of ideographs in the right IPS, while asemantic visual processing was found in the left fusiform gyrus. In contrast to the ideographs, the semantic processing of numerals was associated with left IPS activity. The role of these brain regions in the semantic and asemantic representation of numerals is discussed. In Experiment 3, the neural response of the visual, auditory, and audiovisual processing of numerals and letters was measured. The regions associated with visual and auditory responses to letters and numerals were highly similar. In contrast, the audiovisual response to numerals recruited a region of the right supramarginal gyrus, while the audiovisual letters activated left visual regions. In addition, an effect of congruency in the audiovisual pairs was comparable across numeral-number name pairs and letter-letter name pairs, but absent in letter-speech sound pairs. Taken together, these three experiments provide new insights into how the brain processes numerical symbols at different levels of description.

Subjects/Keywords: Hindu-Arabic numerals; fMRI; numerical magnitude representation; audiovisual integration; intraparietal sulcus; fusiform gyrus; superior temporal gyrus; Cognitive Neuroscience

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Holloway, I. D. (2012). Symbolizing Number: fMRI investigations of the semantic, auditory, and visual correlates of Hindu-Arabic numerals. (Thesis). University of Western Ontario. Retrieved from https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/711

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Holloway, Ian Douglas. “Symbolizing Number: fMRI investigations of the semantic, auditory, and visual correlates of Hindu-Arabic numerals.” 2012. Thesis, University of Western Ontario. Accessed November 29, 2020. https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/711.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Holloway, Ian Douglas. “Symbolizing Number: fMRI investigations of the semantic, auditory, and visual correlates of Hindu-Arabic numerals.” 2012. Web. 29 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Holloway ID. Symbolizing Number: fMRI investigations of the semantic, auditory, and visual correlates of Hindu-Arabic numerals. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Western Ontario; 2012. [cited 2020 Nov 29]. Available from: https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/711.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Holloway ID. Symbolizing Number: fMRI investigations of the semantic, auditory, and visual correlates of Hindu-Arabic numerals. [Thesis]. University of Western Ontario; 2012. Available from: https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/711

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Vogel, Stephan Erich. Cortical Representation Underlying the Semantic Processing of Numerical Symbols: Evidence from Adult and Developmental Studies.

Degree: 2013, University of Western Ontario

Humans possess the remarkable ability to process numerical information using numerical symbols such as Arabic digits. A growing body of neuroimaging work has provided new insights into the neural correlates associated with symbolic numerical magnitude processing. However, little is known about the cortical specialization underlying the representation of symbolic numerical magnitude in adults and children. To constrain our current knowledge, I conducted a series of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) studies that aimed to better understand the functional specialization of symbolic numerical magnitudes representation in the human brain. Using a number line estimation task, the first study contrasted the brain activation associated with processing symbolic numerical magnitude against the brain activation associated with non-numerical magnitude (brightness) processing. Results demonstrated a right lateralized parietal network that was commonly engaged when magnitude dimensions were processed. However, the left intraparietal sulcus (IPS) was additionally activated when symbolic numerical magnitudes were estimated, suggesting that number is a special category amongst magnitude dimensions and that the left hemisphere plays a critical role in representing number. The second study tested a child friendly version of an fMRI-adaptation paradigm in adults. For this participant’s brain response was habituated to a numerical value (i.e., 6) and signal recovery in response to the presentation of numerical deviants was investigated. Across two different brain normalization procedures results showed a replication of previous findings demonstrating that the brain response of the IPS is modulated by the semantic meaning of numbers in the absence of overt response selection. The last study aimed to unravel developmental changes in the cortical representation of symbolic numerical magnitudes in children. Using the paradigm tested in chapter 2, results demonstrated an increase in the signal recovery with age in the left IPS as well as an age-independent signal recovery in the right IPS. This finding indicates that the left IPS becomes increasingly specialized for the representation of symbolic numerical magnitudes over developmental time, while the right IPS may play a different and earlier role in symbolic numerical magnitude representation. Findings of these studies are discussed in relation to our current knowledge about symbolic numerical magnitude representation.

Subjects/Keywords: Symbolic numerical magnitude; fMRI; numerical and non-numerical magnitude representation; intraparietal sulcus (IPS); development of symbolic number representation; hemispheric lateralization; Developmental Psychology

…156! 5.1.2.$Probing$symbolic$numerical$magnitude$representation$in$adults… …therefore, semantic knowledge (i.e., the representation of numerical magnitude) that is… …discriminations and are taken as an index for numerical magnitude representation. The presence and… …numerical magnitude representation. It should be noted that the numerical distance effect is… …Weber’s law and reflects the approximate nature of numerical magnitude representation. The… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Vogel, S. E. (2013). Cortical Representation Underlying the Semantic Processing of Numerical Symbols: Evidence from Adult and Developmental Studies. (Thesis). University of Western Ontario. Retrieved from https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/1500

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Vogel, Stephan Erich. “Cortical Representation Underlying the Semantic Processing of Numerical Symbols: Evidence from Adult and Developmental Studies.” 2013. Thesis, University of Western Ontario. Accessed November 29, 2020. https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/1500.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Vogel, Stephan Erich. “Cortical Representation Underlying the Semantic Processing of Numerical Symbols: Evidence from Adult and Developmental Studies.” 2013. Web. 29 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Vogel SE. Cortical Representation Underlying the Semantic Processing of Numerical Symbols: Evidence from Adult and Developmental Studies. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Western Ontario; 2013. [cited 2020 Nov 29]. Available from: https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/1500.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Vogel SE. Cortical Representation Underlying the Semantic Processing of Numerical Symbols: Evidence from Adult and Developmental Studies. [Thesis]. University of Western Ontario; 2013. Available from: https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/1500

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Melbourne

3. Chew, Shu Wen Cindy. Implications of different patterns of non-symbolic and symbolic magnitude representations for children’s mathematical abilities.

Degree: 2019, University of Melbourne

It has been argued that early math ability rests on two core, putatively innate, number systems: a precise small number system that allows an accurate and rapid apprehension of the numerosity of small sets (i.e., subitizing), and an approximate magnitude representation that allows discrimination between quantities. Moreover, differences in core number systems functioning are claimed to underlie differences in math ability. It is, furthermore, claimed that non-symbolic magnitude representations scaffold symbolic magnitude representations and ipso facto, math abilities. While these claims are frequently made, evidence in support of them is less than convincing. One difficulty in clarifying the relationships between the two magnitude representations, or core number and maths abilities, is the large inter-individual variation in these abilities in young children which may obscure the relationships between them. Most research that has examined this issue has used variable-oriented analytic methods that treat variance as error or noise. It is proposed herein that using a person-centred analytic method (i.e., latent profile modelling) to explicate the variance may allow identification of different ability patterns (latent profiles) that reside within the overall variance distribution and, in turn, provide a more nuanced developmental model of numerical cognition. To this end, three studies were conducted that focus on the significance of different patterns of non-symbolic–symbolic magnitude representations (Studies 1 and 2), and the relationship between these patterns and different patterns of the apprehension of small sets (Study 3). In Study 1(a), 124 five- to seven-year-old children completed non-symbolic and symbolic magnitude judgement tasks, cognitive measures often associated with math ability (visuo-spatial working memory [VSWM], naming Hindu-Arabic numbers and processing speed) as well as transcoding, and a single digit addition (SDA) test. A latent profile analysis (LPA) of the magnitude judgment accuracies and response times revealed four different patterns of non-symbolic–symbolic magnitude ability relationships residing within the overall variance distribution. The cognitive measures were related to the four profiles in different ways; and the profiles predicted differences in SDA and transcoding abilities. In Study 2(b), a partial replication of Study 1, 109 five- to six-year-old children completed the same tasks as Study 1 twice–one year apart. Latent transition analysis, a longitudinal extension of LPA, examined change and stability patterns in the four profiles over time. Similar to Study 1, the findings showed the patterns were differentially associated with cognitive and math abilities. Study 3 examined the relationship between non-symbolic–symbolic magnitude ability patterns and small precise number ability patterns. The findings replicated those of Studies 1 and 2, and also showed an overlap in the two core number abilities. While only VSWM and magnitude ability patterns predicted SDA abilities (over…

Subjects/Keywords: Individual differences; Non-symbolic and symbolic magnitude representation; Subitizing; Approximate large number system; Precise small number system; Children's math abilities; Person-centered analytic method; Latent profile/transition analysis; Ability patterns; Numerical cognition; Cognitive ability

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chew, S. W. C. (2019). Implications of different patterns of non-symbolic and symbolic magnitude representations for children’s mathematical abilities. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Melbourne. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11343/234290

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chew, Shu Wen Cindy. “Implications of different patterns of non-symbolic and symbolic magnitude representations for children’s mathematical abilities.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Melbourne. Accessed November 29, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/11343/234290.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chew, Shu Wen Cindy. “Implications of different patterns of non-symbolic and symbolic magnitude representations for children’s mathematical abilities.” 2019. Web. 29 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Chew SWC. Implications of different patterns of non-symbolic and symbolic magnitude representations for children’s mathematical abilities. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Melbourne; 2019. [cited 2020 Nov 29]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11343/234290.

Council of Science Editors:

Chew SWC. Implications of different patterns of non-symbolic and symbolic magnitude representations for children’s mathematical abilities. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Melbourne; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11343/234290

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