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You searched for subject:(nuclear introns). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Schwenke, Piper. History and extent of introgressive hybridization in Puget Sound rockfishes (Sebastes auriculatus, S. caurinus, and S. maliger).

Degree: 2013, University of Washington

Natural hybridization is common in closely related species especially where they invade novel habitat. The patterns of introgressive hybridization are often asymmetrical and are attributed to various influences from selection to gene flow and dispersal. Hybridization has previously been detected in S. auriculatus, S. caurinus, and S. maliger in Puget Sound (the southern Salish Sea) but the details of the history and direction of introgression are incomplete. These Pacific rockfish species are sympatric over most of their geographic range but hybridization has only been detected in Puget Sound. In order to measure interspecific gene flow, we used sequence data from one mitochondrial locus, three nuclear intron loci, and one coding gene to compare interspecific gene flow between collections from the Salish Sea and the Pacific coast. Although ancestral polymorphisms could not be excluded in the analysis of phylogenetic trees, coalescence analysis provided clear evidence for broad-scale, asymmetrical introgression from S. maliger into S. auriculatus and S. caurinus and a much lower incidence of introgression between S. auriculatus and S. caurinus. The absence of F1 hybrids was consistent with historical hybridization events or ongoing, low-level hybridization in the Salish Sea. Although hybrids were found in high frequency, introgressed rockfish in the Salish Sea appear to maintain the morphological characters and coloration of pure parental species morphology. This rockfish hybrid system, with asymmetrical introgression and the maintenance of parental species, may prove useful to study both mechanisms that maintain species boundaries and processes that facilitate speciation. Advisors/Committee Members: Hauser, Lorenz (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: coalescence; introgression; mitochondria; nuclear introns; phylogenetics; sequence; Fisheries and aquatic sciences; Molecular biology; Fisheries

…to compare gene trees from mitochondrial and several independent nuclear genetic loci (… …to evolve to species monophyly faster than diploid biparentally inherited nuclear loci… …x28;Palumbi 2001). Monophyly at nuclear loci genealogies and shared polymorphisms at… …more susceptible to introgressive hybridization than nuclear loci (Rieseberg and Soltis… …sequence data and diploid nuclear data for each species group and locus were phased into… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Schwenke, P. (2013). History and extent of introgressive hybridization in Puget Sound rockfishes (Sebastes auriculatus, S. caurinus, and S. maliger). (Thesis). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/21967

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Schwenke, Piper. “History and extent of introgressive hybridization in Puget Sound rockfishes (Sebastes auriculatus, S. caurinus, and S. maliger).” 2013. Thesis, University of Washington. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/21967.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Schwenke, Piper. “History and extent of introgressive hybridization in Puget Sound rockfishes (Sebastes auriculatus, S. caurinus, and S. maliger).” 2013. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Schwenke P. History and extent of introgressive hybridization in Puget Sound rockfishes (Sebastes auriculatus, S. caurinus, and S. maliger). [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Washington; 2013. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/21967.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Schwenke P. History and extent of introgressive hybridization in Puget Sound rockfishes (Sebastes auriculatus, S. caurinus, and S. maliger). [Thesis]. University of Washington; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/21967

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Brigham Young University

2. Benavides, Edgar. Evolution in Neotropical Herpetofauna: Species Boundaries in High Andean Frogs and Evolutionary Genetics in the Lava Lizard Genus Microlophus (Squamata: tropiduridae): A History of Colonization and Dispersal.

Degree: PhD, 2006, Brigham Young University

In this collection of papers I have summarized my investigations into the field of evolutionary genetics and more specifically into patterns of biodiversity and evolutionary processes. The lizards (and frogs) studied here share common features in that they are largely present in unique environments, which are also regions that are biologically understudied. Most of these taxa show high degrees of endemism, interesting natural history characteristics, and each group manifests distinctive adaptations of general evolutionary interest. My work in the genus Telmatobius has been a progressive approach that began in my MS program, and it first focused on alpha taxonomy, morphological variation, and species boundaries. This work led to new studies initiated and completed at BYU involving further taxonomic revision (Formas et al., 2003; Chapter 1), and then revisiting and re-evaluating species boundaries established earlier (with allozyme markers) and this time with population level molecular (mitochondrial DNA) markers (Chapter 2). Our results indicate that the striking differences in size, coloration and general appearance in the various Lake Titicaca morphotypes are not genetically based. Further, there is evidence that these morphotypes have evolved very rapidly after demographic bottlenecks eroded present genetic variability. Telmatobius frogs of Lake Titicaca are listed by the International (IUCN) as critically endangered. We support this classification and further suggest studies to explore open questions like the possibility of adaptation along ecological resource gradients. Lizards of the genus Microlophus are interesting but for different reasons, and studies of this group constitutes the bulk of my dissertation work. The genus includes both Galapagos insular species, and continental taxa distributed in a linear gradient along > 4000 km of the western coast of South America. In studying Microlophus I first tackled the unresolved phylogenetic relationships within the genus (Chapter 3) and then pay attention to phylogeographic aspects of the most speciose lizard radiation in the Galapagos Archipelago (Chapter 4). Chapter 3 is a single manuscript provisionally accepted in the journal Systematic Biology. This paper introduces the lizard genus Microlophus (“lava lizards”) as a study system, and includes a large nuclear data set accompanied by an equally large mitochondrial data set (7877 characters in total). This paper explicitly differentiates among sequence alignments of gene regions that vary in tempo and class of mutational events. We show that this recognition is important and we suggest ways to appropriately deal with the alignment of multi-locus non-coding DNA data sets. A secondary finding in this study is that mtDNA and nDNA topologies are discordant with each other but that both are strongly supported, and that the nuclear topology is concordant with species distribution patterns along coastal South America. We hypothesize that in this particular region of the tree, the nuclear genome recovers a topology…

Subjects/Keywords: nuclear introns; alignment; length mutations; Microlophus; secondary contact; mitochondrial-nuclear conflict; phylogenetics; Galapagos; mtDNA; phylogeography; nested clade analysis; colonization routes; volcanism; lava lizards; Biology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Benavides, E. (2006). Evolution in Neotropical Herpetofauna: Species Boundaries in High Andean Frogs and Evolutionary Genetics in the Lava Lizard Genus Microlophus (Squamata: tropiduridae): A History of Colonization and Dispersal. (Doctoral Dissertation). Brigham Young University. Retrieved from https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2299&context=etd

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Benavides, Edgar. “Evolution in Neotropical Herpetofauna: Species Boundaries in High Andean Frogs and Evolutionary Genetics in the Lava Lizard Genus Microlophus (Squamata: tropiduridae): A History of Colonization and Dispersal.” 2006. Doctoral Dissertation, Brigham Young University. Accessed March 05, 2021. https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2299&context=etd.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Benavides, Edgar. “Evolution in Neotropical Herpetofauna: Species Boundaries in High Andean Frogs and Evolutionary Genetics in the Lava Lizard Genus Microlophus (Squamata: tropiduridae): A History of Colonization and Dispersal.” 2006. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Benavides E. Evolution in Neotropical Herpetofauna: Species Boundaries in High Andean Frogs and Evolutionary Genetics in the Lava Lizard Genus Microlophus (Squamata: tropiduridae): A History of Colonization and Dispersal. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Brigham Young University; 2006. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2299&context=etd.

Council of Science Editors:

Benavides E. Evolution in Neotropical Herpetofauna: Species Boundaries in High Andean Frogs and Evolutionary Genetics in the Lava Lizard Genus Microlophus (Squamata: tropiduridae): A History of Colonization and Dispersal. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Brigham Young University; 2006. Available from: https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2299&context=etd


University of Florida

3. Hector, Ronald Earl, 1972-. Posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression by a nuclear polyadenylated RNA binding protein.

Degree: 2000, University of Florida

Subjects/Keywords: Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins; In vitro fertilization; Introns; Messenger RNA; Nucleotides; Polyadenylation; RNA; Small nucleolar RNA; Splicing; Yeasts; Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology thesis Ph.D ( mesh ); Gene Expression Regulation ( mesh ); Genetic Techniques ( mesh ); Nuclear Proteins ( mesh ); RNA Precursors ( mesh ); RNA, Messenger ( mesh ); RNA-Binding Proteins ( mesh ); Research ( mesh ); City of Gainesville ( local )

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hector, Ronald Earl, 1. (2000). Posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression by a nuclear polyadenylated RNA binding protein. (Thesis). University of Florida. Retrieved from https://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00038398

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hector, Ronald Earl, 1972-. “Posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression by a nuclear polyadenylated RNA binding protein.” 2000. Thesis, University of Florida. Accessed March 05, 2021. https://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00038398.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hector, Ronald Earl, 1972-. “Posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression by a nuclear polyadenylated RNA binding protein.” 2000. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Hector, Ronald Earl 1. Posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression by a nuclear polyadenylated RNA binding protein. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Florida; 2000. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: https://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00038398.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Hector, Ronald Earl 1. Posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression by a nuclear polyadenylated RNA binding protein. [Thesis]. University of Florida; 2000. Available from: https://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00038398

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.