Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:(nictitating membrane). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Texas A&M University

1. Graham, Jennifer Margaret. The Effects of Pavlovian Conditioning in Two Discrete Environments.

Degree: MS, Biomedical Sciences, 2016, Texas A&M University

The purpose of this literature review is to examine whether Pavlovian eye blink conditioning in the rabbit consists solely of a specific motor reflex or involves other extracerebellar control systems. Castiglioni et al. (2009) utilized a transfer design in which retention of learning in different environments and the expression of the original learning was not limited to a single motor reflex measure. Subjects were trained in a traditional Pavlovian stock to differentiate between an S+ signal of a brief tone paired with an unconditioned stimulus (US) of cutaneous shock. Then, subjects were tested for what they had learned in a different environment. The results showed that the presentation of the S+ produced completely different behavior in the open environment as compared to the Pavlovian stock. In the restricted environment of the Pavlovian stock, presentation of the S+ produced eye blink responses without any additional motor or emotional reactions. In the transfer environment, reaction to the S+ produced: (a) a prolonged disruption of ongoing behavior, (b) a wide range of complex emotional responses, and (c) a complete absence of eye blink response. Reaction to the S- in the Pavlovian stock or in the open environment, did not elicit an eye blink response. These findings provide strong evidence that Pavlovian conditioning is not just a specific motor reflex, but instead involves a difference in meaning and significance of the S+ for the subjects when presented in two discrete environments. This is observed in the subjects’ different response patterns which unmasked a significant emotional component of the conditioning. This lead to the conclusion that nictitating membrane (NM) conditioning consists of more than an invariant, discrete cerebellar oculomotor reflex. The clear emotional component to the conditioning indicates the involvement of extracerebellar control mechanisms, potentially a widespread cerebral network in addition to the microcerebellar control of the specific motor reflex, a contradiction to current neuromodels. Advisors/Committee Members: Welsh, Cristabel J (advisor), Steele-Russell, Ian (committee member), Pine, Michelle (committee member), Tizard, Ian (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Pavlovian conditioning; eye blink; nictitating membrane; rabbit

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Graham, J. M. (2016). The Effects of Pavlovian Conditioning in Two Discrete Environments. (Masters Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/156307

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Graham, Jennifer Margaret. “The Effects of Pavlovian Conditioning in Two Discrete Environments.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed October 29, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/156307.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Graham, Jennifer Margaret. “The Effects of Pavlovian Conditioning in Two Discrete Environments.” 2016. Web. 29 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Graham JM. The Effects of Pavlovian Conditioning in Two Discrete Environments. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2016. [cited 2020 Oct 29]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/156307.

Council of Science Editors:

Graham JM. The Effects of Pavlovian Conditioning in Two Discrete Environments. [Masters Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/156307


University College London (University of London)

2. Rahman, Shbana. The cerebellar cortex & motor learning.

Degree: PhD, 2001, University College London (University of London)

The role of the cerebellum in movement control may involve the formation and storage of motor memories. This thesis examines the role of the cerebellum in a simple associative motor learning task - classical conditioning of the nictitating membrane response (NMR) of the rabbit. Repeated pairings of a tone stimulus with a tactile periocular stimulus leads to the formation of conditioned NMRs. Lesion studies have shown that conditioning of the eyelid response and NMR is critically dependent upon the cerebellum and its associated circuitry. However, permanent lesions cannot establish whether memories are stored in the cerebellum because they cannot dissociate performance and learning effects. Localised reversible inactivations can reveal whether a region is actively involved in learning and the formation of memories because the system can be tested after recovery from the inactivation. The inferior olive, cerebellar cortex and cerebellar nuclei are interconnected to form a module whose function can be altered by disturbances at any point in the circuit. Reversible inactivations of the cerebellar anterior interpositus nucleus or the olivary inputs to the cerebellum prevent NMR conditioning, but inactivation of cerebellar nuclear efferents in the brachium conjunctivum does not. These findings provide strong support for the suggestion that essential plasticity for NMR conditioning is within the cerebellum. However, reversible inactivations have not been used directly to test whether cerebellar cortical function is also critical for learning. The experiments presented in this thesis used reversible inactivations of cerebellar cortical lobule HVI to demonstrate that it is essential for performance, acquisition and extinction of NMR conditioning. These findings are consistent with several theoretical models of motor learning that assign essential plasticity to the cerebellar cortex. The results are discussed in the light of our current understanding of cerebellar cortical plasticity at the system and cellular level.

Subjects/Keywords: 152; Nictitating membrane response

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rahman, S. (2001). The cerebellar cortex & motor learning. (Doctoral Dissertation). University College London (University of London). Retrieved from https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10103893/ ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.248049

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rahman, Shbana. “The cerebellar cortex & motor learning.” 2001. Doctoral Dissertation, University College London (University of London). Accessed October 29, 2020. https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10103893/ ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.248049.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rahman, Shbana. “The cerebellar cortex & motor learning.” 2001. Web. 29 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Rahman S. The cerebellar cortex & motor learning. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University College London (University of London); 2001. [cited 2020 Oct 29]. Available from: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10103893/ ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.248049.

Council of Science Editors:

Rahman S. The cerebellar cortex & motor learning. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University College London (University of London); 2001. Available from: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10103893/ ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.248049

.