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You searched for subject:(nest concealment). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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NSYSU

1. Sung, Hsin-Yi. Effect of Nest Structure on Microclimate and Hatching Success of Roseate Tern (Sterna dougallii) on the Islands of Penghu, Taiwan.

Degree: Master, Biological Sciences, 2009, NSYSU

Appropriate microclimates are essential for the development of embryos in avian eggs. Physical demands of incubating adults would also be affected by microclimate. The breeding areas of the Roseate Tern (Sterna dougallii) overlap with intense solar radiation and the presence of tropical cyclone and they prefer nest structure with vegetation or rock walls, as these may provide concealment to the surrounding weather. The objectives of this study were to examine the effect of nest structure on the nest microclimate and hatching success. In addition to nest structures, the effect of nest materials and parental incubation behavior on microclimate were also investigated. Results showed that the average temperature of vegetation-removed nests was higher than that of the control group. Rock walls seemed to prevent moisture formed from dew and rain. Incubation behavior can prevent eggs from overheating. However, there were no differences in parental thermal behavior and hatching success between nest types. To sum up, vegetation next to the nest can prevent the eggs from overheating while parents were temporarily absent. Parental incubation can insulate the eggs from surrounding weather stresses, and compensate the negative effect of nest structure with harsh conditions. Advisors/Committee Members: Yuan-Hsun Sun (chair), Hsiao-Wei Yuan (committee member), Hsiao-Wei Yuan (chair).

Subjects/Keywords: nest concealment; microhabitat; heat stress; parental care

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APA (6th Edition):

Sung, H. (2009). Effect of Nest Structure on Microclimate and Hatching Success of Roseate Tern (Sterna dougallii) on the Islands of Penghu, Taiwan. (Thesis). NSYSU. Retrieved from http://etd.lib.nsysu.edu.tw/ETD-db/ETD-search/view_etd?URN=etd-0211109-102907

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sung, Hsin-Yi. “Effect of Nest Structure on Microclimate and Hatching Success of Roseate Tern (Sterna dougallii) on the Islands of Penghu, Taiwan.” 2009. Thesis, NSYSU. Accessed April 16, 2021. http://etd.lib.nsysu.edu.tw/ETD-db/ETD-search/view_etd?URN=etd-0211109-102907.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sung, Hsin-Yi. “Effect of Nest Structure on Microclimate and Hatching Success of Roseate Tern (Sterna dougallii) on the Islands of Penghu, Taiwan.” 2009. Web. 16 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Sung H. Effect of Nest Structure on Microclimate and Hatching Success of Roseate Tern (Sterna dougallii) on the Islands of Penghu, Taiwan. [Internet] [Thesis]. NSYSU; 2009. [cited 2021 Apr 16]. Available from: http://etd.lib.nsysu.edu.tw/ETD-db/ETD-search/view_etd?URN=etd-0211109-102907.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Sung H. Effect of Nest Structure on Microclimate and Hatching Success of Roseate Tern (Sterna dougallii) on the Islands of Penghu, Taiwan. [Thesis]. NSYSU; 2009. Available from: http://etd.lib.nsysu.edu.tw/ETD-db/ETD-search/view_etd?URN=etd-0211109-102907

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Arizona

2. Borgmann, Kathi Louise. Mechanisms Underlying Intra-seasonal Variation in the Risk of Avian Nest Predation: Implications for Breeding Phenology .

Degree: 2010, University of Arizona

Predation is an important ecological process that shapes life-history traits, community dynamics, and species coexistence and therefore has been suggested to explain many patterns in avian ecology. Although many studies have reported spatial, temporal, or interspecific patterns in nest predation, relatively few studies have been designed to identify the specific mechanism(s) that underlie these patterns. I examined mechanisms underlying the risk of nest predation in birds by (1) reviewing nine of the most commonly cited hypotheses to explain spatial, temporal, and interspecific variation in the risk of nest predation, (2) conducting a comparative analysis of the nest-concealment hypothesis to examine which methodological issues, extrinsic factors, and species traits influence whether or not foliage density affects the risk of nest predation, and (3) testing six mechanistic hypotheses to determine the underlying cause(s) of intra-seasonal decreases in the risk of nest predation.Many of the hypotheses invoked to explain spatial, temporal, and interspecific variation in the risk of nest predation lack clearly defined mechanisms. I suggest that future studies explicitly define the mechanism and assumption(s) of each hypothesis prior to implementing empirical tests.I found that the discrepancy in results among past studies that have examined the nest-concealment hypothesis was due to interspecific differences in a variety of intrinsic and extrinsic factors that affect nest predation but have previously been ignored. The effects of nest concealment on nest placement and probability of nest predation vary among species and this variation is predictable based on the bird's morphological traits and characteristics of the ecosystem.Increased risk of nest predation early in the breeding season appears to be due, in part, to foliage phenology and spatial and temporal changes in predator behavior. The risk of nest predation was negatively associated with foliage density early, but not late, in the breeding season. Supplemental food provided to nest predators resulted in a numerical response by nest predators, increasing the risk of nest predation at nests located near feeders. I show that intra-seasonal changes in environmental features and predator behavior affect patterns of nest predation, which can influence timing of breeding. Advisors/Committee Members: Conway, Courtney J (advisor), Morrison, Michael L (advisor), Morrison, Michael L. (committeemember), Badyaev, Alex V. (committeemember), Steidl, Robert J. (committeemember).

Subjects/Keywords: Breeding phenology; Foliage density; Nest concealment; Nest predation; Phenology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Borgmann, K. L. (2010). Mechanisms Underlying Intra-seasonal Variation in the Risk of Avian Nest Predation: Implications for Breeding Phenology . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Arizona. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195002

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Borgmann, Kathi Louise. “Mechanisms Underlying Intra-seasonal Variation in the Risk of Avian Nest Predation: Implications for Breeding Phenology .” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Arizona. Accessed April 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195002.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Borgmann, Kathi Louise. “Mechanisms Underlying Intra-seasonal Variation in the Risk of Avian Nest Predation: Implications for Breeding Phenology .” 2010. Web. 16 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Borgmann KL. Mechanisms Underlying Intra-seasonal Variation in the Risk of Avian Nest Predation: Implications for Breeding Phenology . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Arizona; 2010. [cited 2021 Apr 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195002.

Council of Science Editors:

Borgmann KL. Mechanisms Underlying Intra-seasonal Variation in the Risk of Avian Nest Predation: Implications for Breeding Phenology . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Arizona; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195002


University of Queensland

3. Fulton, Graham R. Nest ecology of a threatened woodland avifauna.

Degree: School of Biological Sciences, 2020, University of Queensland

Subjects/Keywords: Dryandra; Australian woodland birds; Nest ecology; Nest predation; Landscape ecology; Concealment; Intact community; 0602 Ecology; 0603 Evolutionary Biology; 0608 Zoology

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Fulton, G. R. (2020). Nest ecology of a threatened woodland avifauna. (Thesis). University of Queensland. Retrieved from https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:b68c75e/thumbnail_s44289050_final_thesis_t.jpg ; https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:b68c75e/s44289050_final_thesis.pdf ; https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:b68c75e

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fulton, Graham R. “Nest ecology of a threatened woodland avifauna.” 2020. Thesis, University of Queensland. Accessed April 16, 2021. https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:b68c75e/thumbnail_s44289050_final_thesis_t.jpg ; https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:b68c75e/s44289050_final_thesis.pdf ; https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:b68c75e.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fulton, Graham R. “Nest ecology of a threatened woodland avifauna.” 2020. Web. 16 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Fulton GR. Nest ecology of a threatened woodland avifauna. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Queensland; 2020. [cited 2021 Apr 16]. Available from: https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:b68c75e/thumbnail_s44289050_final_thesis_t.jpg ; https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:b68c75e/s44289050_final_thesis.pdf ; https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:b68c75e.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Fulton GR. Nest ecology of a threatened woodland avifauna. [Thesis]. University of Queensland; 2020. Available from: https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:b68c75e/thumbnail_s44289050_final_thesis_t.jpg ; https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:b68c75e/s44289050_final_thesis.pdf ; https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:b68c75e

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.