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You searched for subject:(national forest inventories). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Wulff, Sören. Monitoring forest damage.

Degree: 2011, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences

The aims of the work this thesis is based upon were to assess past and current methods of monitoring forest damage in Sweden and to propose key components of a new monitoring system that would be better adapted to the information requirements. A utilitarian perspective is adopted in the thesis, thus forest damage is defined as anything that reduces the vitality of trees in a forest or their economic value. Similarly, the term forest condition is used to describe the extent to which damage has reduced the vitality of trees, as assessed (largely) through crown defoliation. Evaluation of the accuracy of large-scale monitoring of forest condition showed significant differences between observer teams, although on average their assessments did not significantly differ from a national standard. The results indicate that the long-term development of forest condition is the most important information that can be obtained from these kinds of inventories. Short-term fluctuations are difficult to interpret, since they may be due to extreme weather events or assessment variability. Large-scale monitoring, such as that performed in national forest inventories, has good potential for estimating geographical distributions, areas, and causes of extensive damage outbreaks. In major outbreaks even gradual changes of damage levels can be estimated with relatively high precision. However, large-scale monitoring also has limitations. To meet current information needs, assessments of forest damage must be timely and be made at several spatial scales. Thus, in addition to broad monitoring programmes that provide time-series information on specific type of damage and their causes, there is a need for local and regional inventories adapted to specific damage events. In this way data can be obtained to support not only general strategic decisions but also specific regional and local mitigation programmes which are likely to become increasingly important following anticipated climate changes. To meet the information needs a new Swedish forest health assessment system is proposed that includes several interacting components targeting the information requirements for strategic and operational decision-making, and accommodates a mechanism for continuously expanding the knowledge base.

Subjects/Keywords: forest pathology; plant condition; plant diseases; monitoring; forest inventories; Forest condition; defoliation; visual perception; national forest inventories; accuracy; precision; tree disease; long-term monitoring; target-tailored inventories

…Dobbertin, 2005). Annual tree-ring widths are obtained in many national forest inventories… …reporting forest conditions in North America. In the USA, the 21 national Forest Health… …state of the forest. Further, the methods applied in the inventories should be reliable… …usefulness of the kind of systematic plot-based sampling designs used in National Forest… …carried out assessments according to Swedish National Forest Damage Inventory (NFDI)… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wulff, S. (2011). Monitoring forest damage. (Doctoral Dissertation). Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. Retrieved from http://pub.epsilon.slu.se/8453/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wulff, Sören. “Monitoring forest damage.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. Accessed December 06, 2019. http://pub.epsilon.slu.se/8453/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wulff, Sören. “Monitoring forest damage.” 2011. Web. 06 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Wulff S. Monitoring forest damage. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences; 2011. [cited 2019 Dec 06]. Available from: http://pub.epsilon.slu.se/8453/.

Council of Science Editors:

Wulff S. Monitoring forest damage. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences; 2011. Available from: http://pub.epsilon.slu.se/8453/


Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences

2. Barth, Andreas. Spatially comprehensive data for forestry scenario analysis.

Degree: 2007, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences

This thesis focuses on the use of forest data for national level policy making. Three major issues were considered: (i) to determine typical requirements of data in forestry scenario analysis, (ii) to evaluate and further develop methods to determine data requirements, and (iii) to develop methods that improve data usability in forestry scenario analysis. Increasingly, the trend is to use spatially comprehensive data as a basis for forestry scenario analysis. Compared to traditional approaches, often limited to sample data, this allows for a broader scope. This is needed since sustainable forestry today must encompass economical and ecological, as well as social perspectives. Different approaches to linking data acquisition strategies with decisions that typically are based on forestry scenario analyses were used in the determination of data requirements. In Paper I, a qualitative framework was developed and applied. The conclusions were that none of the currently used Swedish data acquisition strategies were able to provide data for adequate multi-resource forestry scenario analysis at national level. In Papers II and III, two quantitative approaches were used for the evaluation of sample-plot imputations; using a decision support system the quantitative consequences of errors and cost-plus-loss with simulations were considered. From Paper II it was clear that traditional approaches to acquiring spatially comprehensive data may lead to severe errors in scenario analyses. Both papers concluded that improvements are required in the methodology of assessing the data. In Paper IV, an analytical cost-plus-loss approach was used to address the issue of decision-making at the national level linked to national forest inventories. The conclusion was that the current level of Swedish national forest inventory is motivated fully by the role of the inventory to provide information for national level timber harvesting planning, whereas the inventory serves many other purposes as well. In Papers V and VI, methods were developed and tested regarding how the usability of spatially comprehensive data for national level forestry scenario analysis can be enhanced. In Paper V an algorithm for spatially consistent imputation within forest stands was developed and found to deliver good results in a case study. In Paper VI, a framework for landscape level imputation aiming at preserving overall composition while enhancing spatial configuration was outlined and tested. A core component of the framework was a restricted imputation algorithm that ensured that the classical imputation problem of data “tending towards the mean” was avoided. Case studies showed promising results, but it is clear that the methodological tool-kit must be further developed before it can be applied in practice.

Subjects/Keywords: forest inventories; planning; decision making; decision support; data collection; data analysis; forest inventory; data acquisition; forest management; decision support systems; forestry scenario analysis; data requirements; national level forest planning; decision-making; policy-making; cost-plus-loss analysis; medium-resolution satellite data; laser scanner data; national forest inventory; data usability; optimisation; imputation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Barth, A. (2007). Spatially comprehensive data for forestry scenario analysis. (Doctoral Dissertation). Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. Retrieved from http://pub.epsilon.slu.se/1613/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Barth, Andreas. “Spatially comprehensive data for forestry scenario analysis.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. Accessed December 06, 2019. http://pub.epsilon.slu.se/1613/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Barth, Andreas. “Spatially comprehensive data for forestry scenario analysis.” 2007. Web. 06 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Barth A. Spatially comprehensive data for forestry scenario analysis. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences; 2007. [cited 2019 Dec 06]. Available from: http://pub.epsilon.slu.se/1613/.

Council of Science Editors:

Barth A. Spatially comprehensive data for forestry scenario analysis. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences; 2007. Available from: http://pub.epsilon.slu.se/1613/

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