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You searched for subject:(music sight solfege). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Florida

1. Holmes, Alena. Effect of Fixed-Do and Movable-Do Solfege Instruction on the Development of Sight-Singing Skills in 7- and 8-year-old Children.

Degree: PhD, Music Education - Music, 2009, University of Florida

EFFECT OF FIXED-DO AND MOVABLE-DO SOLFEGE INSTRUCTION ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF SIGHT-SINGING SKILLS IN 7- AND 8-YEAR-OLD CHILDREN By Alena V. Holmes May 2009 Chair: Timothy S. Brophy Major: Music Education The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of movable-do and fixed-do solfege instruction on the development of sight-singing skills of 7- and 8-year-old children. The main research question was: What effect does pedagogical approach have on children's sight singing achievement? Participants (N=181) for this study were students from twelve second grade classes from six schools in north central Florida. Four classes from two schools were randomly assigned to Experimental Group One that participated in movable-do solfege instruction. Four classes from two other schools were randomly assigned to Experimental Group Two that participated in fixed-do solfege instruction. Four classes from the remaining schools were assigned to be the Control Group which did not receive any solfege instruction, but participated in other singing and music reading activities. Participants in the experimental groups received solfege instruction for 10 sessions of general music classes, each 20 minutes in length. During the treatment period two different approaches to the solfege instruction were used: (1) movable do instructional approach, which was based on Conversational Solfege method developed by John Feierabend and influenced by Koda acutely pedagogy and Gordon s Music Learning Theory; and (2) fixed-do approach to the instruction based on Russian solfege textbooks by Frolova and Metalidi and Petcovskaya, which are traditionally influenced by French solfe gravege methodology. The children were individually tested prior to instruction and then again after the completion of 10 sessions. The children sight-sang randomly selected tonal patterns made of syllables do, re, mi and sol, mi and la. Sight-singing performance was evaluated for pitch and contour accuracy. To control for the effect of developmental tonal aptitude on sight-singing achievement, the Intermediate Measures of Music Audiation was administered prior to instruction. To control for singing voice development, the Singing Voice Development Measure was administered before and after experimental treatment to find out how the level of singing voice development affects sight-singing performance. Results revealed a significant improvement in sight-singing achievement for both experimental groups. Children who participated in movable-do solfege instruction demonstrated highest scores on the post-tests and greatest gain in sight-singing achievement. MANCOVA test for total score on sight-singing post-tests revealed a significant effect for the pedagogical approach (F = 4.24, df = 2, 176, p < 0.05), school (F = 13.98, df = 3, 176, p < 0.001). Singing Voice Development Measure pre-test (F = 6.86, df = 6, 176, p < 0.001) and scores on sight-singing pre-test (F = 21.63, df = 1, 176, p < 0.001). Multiple regression procedures revealed that the number of solfege sessions (p <… Advisors/Committee Members: Brophy, Timothy S. (committee chair), Ellis, Laura R. (committee member), Hoffer, Charles R. (committee member), Dana, Thomas M. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Music education; Music learning; Music reading; Music teachers; Musical rudiments; Pedagogy; Sight singing; Singing; Solmization; Sound pitch; music, sight, solfege

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Holmes, A. (2009). Effect of Fixed-Do and Movable-Do Solfege Instruction on the Development of Sight-Singing Skills in 7- and 8-year-old Children. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Florida. Retrieved from http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0024398

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Holmes, Alena. “Effect of Fixed-Do and Movable-Do Solfege Instruction on the Development of Sight-Singing Skills in 7- and 8-year-old Children.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Florida. Accessed September 15, 2019. http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0024398.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Holmes, Alena. “Effect of Fixed-Do and Movable-Do Solfege Instruction on the Development of Sight-Singing Skills in 7- and 8-year-old Children.” 2009. Web. 15 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Holmes A. Effect of Fixed-Do and Movable-Do Solfege Instruction on the Development of Sight-Singing Skills in 7- and 8-year-old Children. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Florida; 2009. [cited 2019 Sep 15]. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0024398.

Council of Science Editors:

Holmes A. Effect of Fixed-Do and Movable-Do Solfege Instruction on the Development of Sight-Singing Skills in 7- and 8-year-old Children. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Florida; 2009. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0024398

2. Sanders, Ronald Byron. The teaching of choral sight singing: analyzing and understanding experienced choral directors' perceptions and beliefs.

Degree: DMA, Music Education, 2015, Boston University

The purpose of this study was to analyze and understand experienced choral directors' perceptions and beliefs on a variety of topics surrounding the teaching and learning of secondary choral music sight singing or sight reading. A focus group of eight highly successful college, high school and middle school choral music educators addressed seven questions. The investigation gathered qualitative data that covered the purposes of teaching sight singing, the positive or negative attributes of movable Do, fixed Do and numbers, and a review of sight-singing curricula. Further, the investigation gathered data on the effect, if any, of an instrumental student's sight-singing ability and the use and effectiveness of Curwen or Kodály hand signs and sight-singing assessment for students. Additional data was gathered concerning how secondary music educators were evaluated. Results suggested that the focus group's purpose in teaching sight singing was to produce independent, self-reliant musicians. Individual sight-singing assessment was deemed important and should focus on how singers progressed. Music composed specifically for sight-singing contests or festivals should contain challenging notes and rhythms, dynamic changes, phrase markings and at least one tempo or meter change. Further, music teacher evaluations were discussed, coded and analyzed. Twenty-nine recommendations are offered that are designed to make sight singing more efficient and more effective in today's choral music classrooms. While there are some very good sight-singing materials in print, music publishers who contemplate printing new instructional material should offer a holistic approach to musicianship. Adjudicators for choral sight-singing festivals and contests should be trained. Choirs entering a sight-singing performance should be adjudicated on musical elements such as meter changes, correct tempi, phrasing, tone, articulation and dynamics, not merely on performing the correct notes and rhythms. Many more recommendations were offered to secondary and college choir teachers, supervisors, contest chairmen, adjudicators, composers, music publishers and students. The investigation was not intended to determine a recommended method for sight-singing instruction nor assessment. The purpose of this study was to understand and analyze experienced choral directors' perceptions and beliefs concerning sight singing on secondary campuses.

Subjects/Keywords: Music education; Music; Sightread; Sight-read; Sightsinging; Sight-singing; Solfege; Sight singing; Sight read; Choral music; Kodály choral method; Curwen method

…Folk Song Sight Singing Series, Grade I–IV .............. 122 7. Music Reading Unlimited… …Music Literacy for Singers, Volumes I – IV ...................... 127 10. Ninety Days to Sight… …music. ..................................... 192 Publishers of sight-singing materials for… …classroom use. ..... 192 Publishers of sight-singing music for contests and festivals.195 Students… …performing music in the 2014 standards. Given the importance of sight singing in choral music… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sanders, R. B. (2015). The teaching of choral sight singing: analyzing and understanding experienced choral directors' perceptions and beliefs. (Doctoral Dissertation). Boston University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2144/16339

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sanders, Ronald Byron. “The teaching of choral sight singing: analyzing and understanding experienced choral directors' perceptions and beliefs.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Boston University. Accessed September 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2144/16339.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sanders, Ronald Byron. “The teaching of choral sight singing: analyzing and understanding experienced choral directors' perceptions and beliefs.” 2015. Web. 15 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Sanders RB. The teaching of choral sight singing: analyzing and understanding experienced choral directors' perceptions and beliefs. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Boston University; 2015. [cited 2019 Sep 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2144/16339.

Council of Science Editors:

Sanders RB. The teaching of choral sight singing: analyzing and understanding experienced choral directors' perceptions and beliefs. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Boston University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2144/16339

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