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You searched for subject:(multisegment foot model). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Brigham Young University

1. Olsen, Mark Taylor. The Role of the Midfoot in Drop Landings.

Degree: MS, 2018, Brigham Young University

The contribution of the midfoot in landing mechanics is understudied. Therefore, the main purpose of this study was to quantify midtarsal joint kinematics and kinetics during a barefoot single-leg landing task. A secondary aim of this study was to explore the relationship between static foot posture and dynamic midfoot function. In a cross-sectional study design, 48 females (age = 20.4 ± 1.8 yr, height = 1.6 ± 0.06 m, weight = 57.3 ± 5.5 kg, BMI = 21.6 ± 1.7 kg·m-1) performed drop landings from a height of 0.4 m onto split force platforms. Subjects hung from wooden rings and landed on their dominant leg. Midtarsal joint kinematic and kinetic data were recorded using a motion capture software system in conjunction with a custom multisegment foot model marker set. Arch height index (AHI) for both seated and standing conditions was measured using the Arch Height Index Measurement System (AHIMS). Kinematic data revealed an average sagittal plane midtarsal range of motion (ROM) of 27 degrees through the landing phase. Kinetic data showed that between 7% and 22% of the total power absorption during the landing was performed by the midtarsal joint. Standing AHI was correlated negatively with sagittal plane midtarsal ROM (p = 0.0264) and positively with midtarsal work (p = 0.0212). Standing midfoot angle (MA) was correlated positively with sagittal plane midtarsal ROM (p = 0.0005) and negatively with midtarsal work (p = 0.0250). The midfoot contributes substantially to landing mechanics during a barefoot single-leg landing task. Static foot posture may be a valuable measurement in predicting midfoot kinematics and kinetics.

Subjects/Keywords: midtarsal joint; multisegment foot model; power absorption; static-dynamic; Exercise Science

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Olsen, M. T. (2018). The Role of the Midfoot in Drop Landings. (Masters Thesis). Brigham Young University. Retrieved from https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=7667&context=etd

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Olsen, Mark Taylor. “The Role of the Midfoot in Drop Landings.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Brigham Young University. Accessed April 23, 2021. https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=7667&context=etd.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Olsen, Mark Taylor. “The Role of the Midfoot in Drop Landings.” 2018. Web. 23 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Olsen MT. The Role of the Midfoot in Drop Landings. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Brigham Young University; 2018. [cited 2021 Apr 23]. Available from: https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=7667&context=etd.

Council of Science Editors:

Olsen MT. The Role of the Midfoot in Drop Landings. [Masters Thesis]. Brigham Young University; 2018. Available from: https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=7667&context=etd


Penn State University

2. Wager, Justin Charles. Assessment of elastic energy in the plantar aponeurosis and its contributions to human running.

Degree: 2015, Penn State University

One of the primary roles of tendons during human locomotion is the storage and release of elastic energy. As the limbs move in cyclic patterns, some of the lower limb tendons stretch and recoil, functioning like springs that reuse a portion of the energy during each step. This function assists in improving the efficiency of human locomotion by reducing the work that is required of the muscles. Testing of cadaveric specimens in situ has demonstrated that the arch of the foot operates in this capacity during simple loading. However, it remains unclear whether the arch functions in this manner during the more complex task of human locomotion. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate one of the main elastic tissues in the arch (the plantar aponeurosis; PA), to examine its ability to store and release elastic energy that potentially contributes to the mechanical energetics of the foot during running. A second aim was to investigate the influence of the initial foot contact pattern on the function of the PA during the stance phase of running. A kinematically driven rigid-body model of the human foot was used to estimate the strain, tensile force, and elastic energy stored within the PA. Calculation of the foot joint moments, powers, and work created by the PA allowed an assessment of the contribution of the PA to the mechanical energetics of running gait. Elastic energy stored within the PA was found to be approximately 3 J, which is comparable to values found during in situ loading. The release of this elastic energy generated a small amount of joint power at the talonavicular joint. This joint power amounted to approximately 5-10% of the combined lower limb joint powers during late stance and contributed to push-off slightly after peak power generation at the ankle. In addition, this analysis revealed that differences existed in the early stance phase behavior of the PA between a non-rearfoot strike and a rearfoot strike, but that these differences did not exist during push-off. Future work will use these findings as a foundation to investigate how the mechanical power generated by the PA influences the energetics of other joints within the lower limb as well as the metabolic cost of locomotion. Advisors/Committee Members: John Henry Challis, Thesis Advisor/Co-Advisor.

Subjects/Keywords: biomechanics; multisegment foot model; locomotion; plantar fascia; elastic energy; strain; longitudinal arch; foot strike

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wager, J. C. (2015). Assessment of elastic energy in the plantar aponeurosis and its contributions to human running. (Thesis). Penn State University. Retrieved from https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/26210

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wager, Justin Charles. “Assessment of elastic energy in the plantar aponeurosis and its contributions to human running.” 2015. Thesis, Penn State University. Accessed April 23, 2021. https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/26210.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wager, Justin Charles. “Assessment of elastic energy in the plantar aponeurosis and its contributions to human running.” 2015. Web. 23 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Wager JC. Assessment of elastic energy in the plantar aponeurosis and its contributions to human running. [Internet] [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2015. [cited 2021 Apr 23]. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/26210.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Wager JC. Assessment of elastic energy in the plantar aponeurosis and its contributions to human running. [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2015. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/26210

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.