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KTH

1. Wirén, Hampus. Asset Management of Electrical Transportation Systems with Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Ground Support Equipment: Case Study Stockholm Arlanda Airport.

Degree: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), 2018, KTH

We have come a long way in the pursuit of reducing our carbon footprint from our way of living, bycontinuously development of batteries and charging infrastructure for electric vehicles to decrease thedemand for fossil fuels, improving the overall energy efficiency and to increase awareness of the problemto the population. One of the industries, that during the last decades has undergone vast improvements,is the development of the airplane engines due to increased emission regulations, for the aviationindustry, and to reduce the costs of air travel. Despite tighter regulations, global impact from travellingby air is increasing due to the explosive increase in number of travels and travellers. In order to copewith the situation, it is of course necessary to further develop fuel and emission effective airplanes, butalso to study the whole chain of emission sources correlated to the air transport industry. So, whilewaiting for improved airplanes there are well known emission effective technologies that can beimplemented already today – implement electric vehicles as support vehicles at airports.Today, and throughout history, most of the focus of air travel has been on the airplane itself. This thesis,that was carried out at KTH Royal Institute of Technology during late spring and autumn 2018, didinstead study the support vehicles used in airports. In this thesis, a generic economic model wasdeveloped in order to estimate the costs involved when replacing traditionally vehicles to suggestedelectrically propelled alternatives. To test and support the development of an economic model, a casestudy has been carried out at Stockholm Arlanda Airport. This case study included a field study to thementioned airport, and in combination with interviews with former employees from one of the groundhandling companies that are currently active in the airport. Raw data was collected over the equipmentand vehicles currently in use. This data was used to describe the vehicles purpose, requirements and toensure that the alternative electric vehicles proposed would offer at least the same performance as thetraditional vehicles. The developed generic economic model was modulated with five stages thatrepresented a selection of input parameters. The collected data became a result in itself and was used asinput to three concurrent theses.The results from the five stages presents the costs during an investment period of between of one tofifteen years. One of the most significant result could be seen from Stage V. This stage showed that thecombined cost to replace all vehicles currently used, with either all new diesel vehicles or electricalternative vehicles, are lower for electric vehicles than for diesel vehicles. Another significant resultcould be seen from the investigation of Stage IV, Stage IV-B, were the model was modulated to representthe case of replacing a vehicle. The results showed that the Letter and Cargo procedures, that travel thefarthest and has the highest fuel consumption of the investigated vehicles, had negative costs…

Subjects/Keywords: Life cycle costs; total cost of ownership; ground support equipment; electrified transportation; asset management; electric vehicle; more electric vehicles; RCAM; Engineering and Technology; Teknik och teknologier

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APA (6th Edition):

Wirén, H. (2018). Asset Management of Electrical Transportation Systems with Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Ground Support Equipment: Case Study Stockholm Arlanda Airport. (Thesis). KTH. Retrieved from http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-253272

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wirén, Hampus. “Asset Management of Electrical Transportation Systems with Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Ground Support Equipment: Case Study Stockholm Arlanda Airport.” 2018. Thesis, KTH. Accessed November 29, 2020. http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-253272.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wirén, Hampus. “Asset Management of Electrical Transportation Systems with Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Ground Support Equipment: Case Study Stockholm Arlanda Airport.” 2018. Web. 29 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Wirén H. Asset Management of Electrical Transportation Systems with Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Ground Support Equipment: Case Study Stockholm Arlanda Airport. [Internet] [Thesis]. KTH; 2018. [cited 2020 Nov 29]. Available from: http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-253272.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Wirén H. Asset Management of Electrical Transportation Systems with Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Ground Support Equipment: Case Study Stockholm Arlanda Airport. [Thesis]. KTH; 2018. Available from: http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-253272

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Cao, Yue. Power electronics implementation of dynamic thermal storage as effective inertia in large energy systems.

Degree: PhD, Electrical & Computer Engr, 2017, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

Modern large energy systems such as electricity grids and electrified transportation encounter increasing processed power in multi-physics domains, such as electrical, mechanical, thermal, and chemical. Although many systems are becoming predominantly electrical dependent, an integrated multi-physics energy approach creates additional avenues to higher power density, system efficiency, and reliability. Power electronics, serving as power conversion mechanisms, are key linking subsystems consisting of electronic devices, electro-mechanical units, energy storage, etc. This dissertation first studies the use of power electronic drives to implement dynamic thermal storage as effective inertia in solar-interfaced grid-connected low-energy buildings, as an example of a stationary large energy system. Dynamic management of energy components is used to offset variability of stochastic solar resources. Emphasis is on power electronic HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning) drives, which can act as an effective electric swing bus to mitigate solar power variability. In doing so, grid power flows become substantially more constant, reducing the need for fast grid resources or dedicated energy storage such as batteries. The work defines a bandwidth over which such HVAC drives can operate. A practical band-pass filter is realized with a lower frequency bound such that the building maintains consistent temperature, and an upper frequency bound to ensure that commanded HVAC fan speeds do not update arbitrarily fast, avoid acoustic discomfort to occupants, and prevent undue hardware wear and tear. The dissertation then moves onto investigation of a mobile energy system, specifically more electric aircraft (MEA), with the purpose of evaluating thermal inertia’s efficacy in a microgrid-like inertia-lacking electrical system. Thermal energy inherent in the cabin air and aircraft fuel serves as a dynamic management solution to offset stochastic load power in the MEA power system. Power electronic controlled environmental control system (ECS) drives, emulating dynamic thermal inertia, showcase a more constant generator output power, allowing potential to downsize required generator ratings. An operating bandwidth is proposed similar to that of building HVAC systems, subject to additional degrees of constraints unique on MEA. A more sensitive virtual synchronous machine control boosts desirable inertia in sub-seconds scales in the MEA power system. To validate the thermal storage as effective inertia in both stationary and mobile energy systems, comprehensive simulation studies and experimental work are conducted at multiple levels. For the energy-efficient building research platform, building electrical and thermal energy systems modeling is addressed, including solar and HVAC systems as well as batteries and large-scale thermal storage. A lab-scale power system features various update rates of a variable frequency fan drive over stochastic solar data. A full-scale multiple-day case study provides insight on potential grid-side… Advisors/Committee Members: Krein, Philip T (advisor), Krein, Philip T (Committee Chair), Alleyne, Andrew G (committee member), Haran, Kiruba S (committee member), Pilawa-Podgurski, Robert CN (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Power electronic and drives; Power systems; Energy storage; Complex system energy management; Thermal storage; Grid-level energy storage; Stochastic energy resources; Energy efficient buildings; Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems; Solar energy; Thermal modeling; Maximum power point tracking (MPPT); High frequency solar data; More electric aircraft (MEA); Electric vehicles; Environmental control systems (ECS); Lithium-ion battery; Modeling and simulation; Loss modeling; Battery modeling; Vehicle dynamic simulator

…runs on non-bleed architecture, such as Boeing 787, also known as more electric aircraft… …mobile phones, power supplies, and electric vehicles. Key advantages are their high energy-to… …travel contain and consume energy. Examples are houses, office buildings, and vehicles, and… …generation has gained more presence, particularly in the form of onsite renewable energy, such as… …five to ten times more electrical power consumption [4]. Although increased… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cao, Y. (2017). Power electronics implementation of dynamic thermal storage as effective inertia in large energy systems. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/98350

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cao, Yue. “Power electronics implementation of dynamic thermal storage as effective inertia in large energy systems.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed November 29, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/98350.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cao, Yue. “Power electronics implementation of dynamic thermal storage as effective inertia in large energy systems.” 2017. Web. 29 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Cao Y. Power electronics implementation of dynamic thermal storage as effective inertia in large energy systems. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2017. [cited 2020 Nov 29]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/98350.

Council of Science Editors:

Cao Y. Power electronics implementation of dynamic thermal storage as effective inertia in large energy systems. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/98350

.