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You searched for subject:(micro scale manufacturing). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Victoria

1. Goo, Chan-Seo. Development of a micro-milling force model and subsystems for miniature Machine Tools (mMTs).

Degree: Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, 2011, University of Victoria

Nowadays, the need for three-dimensional miniaturized components is increasing in many areas, such as electronics, biomedics, aerospace and defence, etc. To support the demands, various micro-scale fabrication techniques have been further introduced and developed over the last decades, including micro-electric-mechanical technologies (MEMS and LIGA), laser ablation, and miniature machine tools (mMTs). Each of these techniques has its own benefits, however miniature machine tools are superior to any others in enabling three-dimensional complex geometry with high relative accuracy, and the capability of dealing with a wide range of mechanical materials. Thus, mMTs are emerging as a promising fabrication process. In this work, various researches have been carried out based on the mMTs. The thesis presents micro-machining, in particular, micro-milling force model and three relevant subsystems for miniature machine tools (mMTs), to enhance machining productivity/efficiency and dimensional accuracy of machined parts. The comprehensive force model that predicts micro-endmilling dynamics has been developed. Unlike conventional macro-machining, the cutting mechanism in micro-machining is complex with high level of non-linearity due to the combined effects of edge radius, size, and minimum chip thickness effect, etc., resulting in no chip formation when the chip thickness is below the minimum chip forming thickness. Instead, part of the work material deforms plastically under the edge of a tool and the rest of the material recovers elastically. The developed force model for micro-endmilling is effective to understand the micro-machining process. As a result, the micro-endmilling force model is helpful to improve the quality of machined parts. In addition, three relevant subsystems which deliver maximum machining productivity and efficiency are also introduced. Firstly, ultrasonic atomization-based cutting fluid application system is introduced. During machining, cutting fluid is required at the cutting zone for cooling and lubricating the cutting tool against the workpiece. Improper cutting fluid application leads to significantly increased tool wear, and which results in overall poor machined parts quality. For the micro-machining, conventional cooling methods using high pressure cutting fluid is not viable due to the potential damage and deflection of weak micro-cutting tools. The new atomization-based cutting fluids application technique has been proven to be quite effective in machinability due to its high level of cooling and lubricating. Secondly, an acoustic emission (AE)-based tool tip positioning method is introduced. Tool tip setting is one of the most important factors to be considered in the CNC machine tool. Since several tools with different geometries are employed during machining, overall dimensional accuracy of the machined parts are determined by accurate coordinates of each tool tip. In particular, tool setting is more important due to micro-scale involved in micro-machining. The newly developed system for… Advisors/Committee Members: Jun, Martin Byung-Guk (supervisor).

Subjects/Keywords: micro-scale manufacturing; micro-coordinate measurement machine; tool tip sensing; micro-endmilling force model; cutting fluid; ultrasonic atomization; Acoustic emission; micro-machining; touch sensing micro-probing; micro-probe

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Goo, C. (2011). Development of a micro-milling force model and subsystems for miniature Machine Tools (mMTs). (Masters Thesis). University of Victoria. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1828/3433

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Goo, Chan-Seo. “Development of a micro-milling force model and subsystems for miniature Machine Tools (mMTs).” 2011. Masters Thesis, University of Victoria. Accessed October 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1828/3433.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Goo, Chan-Seo. “Development of a micro-milling force model and subsystems for miniature Machine Tools (mMTs).” 2011. Web. 20 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Goo C. Development of a micro-milling force model and subsystems for miniature Machine Tools (mMTs). [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Victoria; 2011. [cited 2019 Oct 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/3433.

Council of Science Editors:

Goo C. Development of a micro-milling force model and subsystems for miniature Machine Tools (mMTs). [Masters Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/3433

2. CHUKEWAD, YOGESH MADHAVRAO. An Investigation of Kinematic Redundancy for Reduced Error in Micromilling.

Degree: Mechanical Engineering, 2014, Arizona State University

Small metallic parts of size less than 1mm, with features measured in tens of microns, with tolerances as small as 0.1 micron are in demand for the research in many fields such as electronics, optics, and biomedical engineering. Because of various drawbacks with non-mechanical micromanufacturing processes, micromilling has shown itself to be an attractive alternative manufacturing method. Micromilling is a microscale manufacturing process that can be used to produce a wide range of small parts, including those that have complex 3-dimensional contours. Although the micromilling process is superficially similar to conventional-scale milling, the physical processes of micromilling are unique due to the scale effects. These scale effects occur due to unequal scaling of the parameters from the macroscale to the microscale milling. One key example of scale effects in micromilling process is a geometrical source of error known as chord error. The chord error limits the feedrate to a reduced value to produce the features within machining tolerances. In this research, it is hypothesized that the increase of chord error in micromilling can be alleviated by intelligent modification of the kinematic arrangement of the micromilling machine. Currently, all 3-axis micromilling machines are constructed with a Cartesian kinematic arrangement with three perpendicular linear axes. In this research, the cylindrical kinematic arrangement is introduced, and an analytical expression for the chord error for this arrangement is derived. The numerical simulations are performed to evaluate the chord errors for the cylindrical kinematic arrangement. It is found that cylindrical kinematic arrangement gives reduced chord error for some types of the desired toolpaths. Then, the kinematic redundancy is introduced to design a novel kinematic arrangement. Several desired toolpaths have been numerically simulated to evaluate the chord error for kinematically redundant arrangement. It is concluded that this arrangement gives up to 5 times reduced error for all the desired toolpaths considered, and allows significant gains in allowable feedrates.

Subjects/Keywords: Mechanical engineering; Robotics; Chord error; Kinematic Redundancy; Micro-Manufacturing; Micromilling; Scale effects

…with the process of trajectory planning. In micro-manufacturing, the trajectory planning… …small plastic parts through methods such as micro-injection molding [1]. These… …submicron tolerances. Other methods besides micromilling can be used to produce these parts: micro… …EDM, micro-ECM [7], and laser micro-machining [8] are examples of… …producing small metallic parts include micro lathe turning [9] and microinjection… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

CHUKEWAD, Y. M. (2014). An Investigation of Kinematic Redundancy for Reduced Error in Micromilling. (Masters Thesis). Arizona State University. Retrieved from http://repository.asu.edu/items/25860

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

CHUKEWAD, YOGESH MADHAVRAO. “An Investigation of Kinematic Redundancy for Reduced Error in Micromilling.” 2014. Masters Thesis, Arizona State University. Accessed October 20, 2019. http://repository.asu.edu/items/25860.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

CHUKEWAD, YOGESH MADHAVRAO. “An Investigation of Kinematic Redundancy for Reduced Error in Micromilling.” 2014. Web. 20 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

CHUKEWAD YM. An Investigation of Kinematic Redundancy for Reduced Error in Micromilling. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Arizona State University; 2014. [cited 2019 Oct 20]. Available from: http://repository.asu.edu/items/25860.

Council of Science Editors:

CHUKEWAD YM. An Investigation of Kinematic Redundancy for Reduced Error in Micromilling. [Masters Thesis]. Arizona State University; 2014. Available from: http://repository.asu.edu/items/25860

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