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You searched for subject:(micro motion stage). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Adelaide

1. Handley, Daniel Charles. The modelling and optimal design of a three degree-of-freedom XYθz micro-motion stage.

Degree: 2007, University of Adelaide

This thesis presents an investigation of the modelling and optimal design of a particular 3-degree-of-freedom (DOF) XYθz micro-motion stage. This stage provides micron-scale motion in X and Y directions and a rotation about the Z-axis. Such a stage can be used for applications where positioning of components with micrometre, or even nanometre positioning accuracy is required. Some applications are; the positioning of samples in a scanning-electron-microscope; the positioning of masks in lithography; aligning fibre-optics and lasers; and manipulation of micro-scale objects in micro-biology or micro-systems assembly. The XYθz micro-motion stage investigated in this study uses a particular topology of monolithic compliant mechanism and three stack piezoelectric actuators. The compliant mechanism used is a 3RRR (three revolute-revolute-revolute) parallel compliant mechanism using flexure hinges. This parallel mechanism uses three RRR linkages. Each of the three RRR linkages uses three circular profile flexure hinges. Each flexure hinge provides predominantly rotational motion about one axis. This topology of mechanism has a symmetrical structure and provides numerous advantages that make it appropriate for use in a micro-motion stage. However, as yet this topology of compliant mechanism has only been investigated by a handful of researchers and it has not been used in any commercially developed systems. The design methodology of a stage using the 3RRR compliant mechanism has not been investigated in detail. In this thesis a study is presented that investigates different approaches to model the 3RRR compliant mechanism and also considers the piezo-actuator modelling, to give the complete XYθz micro-motion stage. Three models are presented and compared; the Pseudo-Rigid-Body Model (PRBM); a two-dimensional Finite-Element-Model (2-D FEM); and a third model is developed that is similar to the PRBM, but uses analytical equations to model the multiple degree-of-freedom compliance of the flexure hinges. The models developed are then used in parametric study so that the relationship between design parameters and output behaviour can be understood. An optimal design approach is then presented to develop an XYθz micro-motion stage for a particular application in a Scanning-Electron-Microscope (SEM). Finally experimental validation of the models is presented. The results of this study indicate which modelling approaches are accurate enough to prove useful for design, while also considering which models are computationally simple enough to be efficient and easy to use. The kinematic and dynamic behaviour of the 3RRR compliant mechanism and XYθz micro-motion stage is discussed in detail. This includes; a comprehensive description of the stage workspace, defining reachable and constant-rotation workspace areas; a discussion of actuator coupling; and in depth investigation of the modes of vibration. The results of the parametric study provide useful insight to aid the design of the XYz micro-motion stage and help simplify optimal… Advisors/Committee Members: Lu, Tien-Fu (advisor), School of Mechanical Engineering (school).

Subjects/Keywords: machine design; manipulators (mechanism); mechanical movements; hinges; finite element method; micro-motion stage; XYθz stage; compliant mechanism; 3RRR compliant mechanism; flexure hinge modelling; pseudo-rigid-body model; Manipulators (Mechanism).; Hinges  – Design and construction.; Finite element method  – Data processing.; Machine design.; Mechanical movements.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Handley, D. C. (2007). The modelling and optimal design of a three degree-of-freedom XYθz micro-motion stage. (Thesis). University of Adelaide. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2440/48304

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Handley, Daniel Charles. “The modelling and optimal design of a three degree-of-freedom XYθz micro-motion stage.” 2007. Thesis, University of Adelaide. Accessed October 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2440/48304.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Handley, Daniel Charles. “The modelling and optimal design of a three degree-of-freedom XYθz micro-motion stage.” 2007. Web. 15 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Handley DC. The modelling and optimal design of a three degree-of-freedom XYθz micro-motion stage. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2007. [cited 2019 Oct 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/48304.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Handley DC. The modelling and optimal design of a three degree-of-freedom XYθz micro-motion stage. [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/48304

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Becker, Aaron. Ensemble control of robotic systems.

Degree: PhD, 1200, 2012, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

In this dissertation, we apply the framework of ensemble control theory to derive an approximate steering algorithm for two classical robotic systems – the nonholonomic unicycle and the plate-ball manipulator – in the presence of model perturbation that scales all inputs by an unknown but bounded constant. The basic idea is to maintain the set of all possible configurations and to select inputs that reduce the size of this set and drive it toward some goal configuration. The key insight is that the evolution of this set can be described by a family of control systems that depend continuously on the unknown constant. Ensemble control theory provides conditions under which it is possible to steer this entire family to a neighborhood of the goal configuration with a single open-loop input trajectory. For both the nonholonomic unicycle and the plate-ball manipulator, we show how to construct this trajectory using piecewise-constant inputs. We also validate our approach with hardware experiments, where the nonholonomic unicycle is a differential-drive robot with unknown wheel size, and the plate-ball manipulator is a planar motion stage that uses magnetic actuation to orient a sphere of unknown radius. We conclude by showing how the same framework can be applied to feedback control of multi-robot systems under the constraint that every robot receives exactly the same control input. We focus on the nonholonomic unicycle, instantiated in experiment by a collection of differential-drive robots. Assuming that each robot has a unique wheel size, we derive a globally asymptotically stabilizing feedback control policy. We show that this policy is robust to standard models of noise and scales to an arbitrary number of robots. These results suggest that our approach may have possible future application to control of micro- and nano-scale robotic systems, which are often subject to similar constraints. Advisors/Committee Members: Bretl, Timothy W. (advisor), Bretl, Timothy W. (Committee Chair), Hutchinson, Seth A. (committee member), Liberzon, Daniel M. (committee member), Domínguez-García, Alejandro D. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: ensemble control; robot; nonholonomic unicycle; plate-ball manipulator; motion planning; robotics; micro/nano robot; micro robot; nano robot; nonholonomic; perturbed parameter; open-loop control; approximate steering; robot motion planning; robust control; robot continuum; model perturbation; robotics; kinematic unicycle; globally asymptotic stabilization; global asymptotic stablility (GAS); control Lyapunov; planar motion stage; magnetic actuation; sphere orient; reorientation; nonholonomic system; feedback control policy; underactuated; underactuation; multi-robot; uniform control input; differential-drive robot; robust control; control theory

…nonholonomic unicycle, a canonical model for robot motion planning. On the right, a plate-ball… …problem, sometimes called the motion planning problem, for these two systems. This dissertation… …guarantee that it is possible to approximate motion in any direction we like. For (1.1)… …perspective. 1.2.2 Motion Planning under Uncertainty There is a vast literature on motion planning… …39] to very recent work on needle-steering using the stochastic motion roadmap [… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Becker, A. (2012). Ensemble control of robotic systems. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/34221

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Becker, Aaron. “Ensemble control of robotic systems.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed October 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/34221.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Becker, Aaron. “Ensemble control of robotic systems.” 2012. Web. 15 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Becker A. Ensemble control of robotic systems. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2012. [cited 2019 Oct 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/34221.

Council of Science Editors:

Becker A. Ensemble control of robotic systems. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/34221

.