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You searched for subject:(manaakitanga). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Lincoln University

1. Lee, Woody. Weaving Mahinga Kai and Landscape Architecture: Designing with nature through people-ecology interactions.

Degree: 2019, Lincoln University

This dissertation investigates in what ways does mahinga kai offer opportunities for the discipline of landscape architecture, both within Aotearoa, New Zealand and potentially beyond. It applies a ‘dwelling perspective’ to the concepts of mahinga kai as a means to expand the discipline’s conceptualisation of landscape. It does this through adapting designoriented tools currently found within landscape architecture research, and grounding them in a case study and a design investigation located within the setting of productive landscapes. The results of this research are four-fold. First, it finds that a culturally encompassing interpretation of mahinga kai, and its concepts, sites and practices, has significant potential to broaden landscape architecture’s conceptualisation of nature and landscape. Second, it finds that a quadrant-based tool has the potential to extend landscape architecture’s current approaches in conceptualising the diverse concepts, sites and practices of mahinga kai. It illustrates mapping as a method of inquiry, in which the reciprocal relationships between site and practice, and the utilisation and protection of resources can be expressed and explored in greater depth. Third, through a design investigation, it finds that concepts of mahinga kai have the potential to extend the scope of landscape architecture beyond its current focus to shape specific sites. It identifies that alternative mahinga kai driven practices – such as reciprocal learning programmes between outsiders and inhabitants – can be designed to materially produce the economic and ecological outcomes of productive landscapes. Finally, it finds a future direction for landscape architecture is to further identify and develop methods that could embrace the cultural complexity of mahinga kai and its concepts. The research illustrates the potential for future research to engage in a greater depth of dialogue in which both landscape architecture and concepts of mahinga kai extend landscape’s role in engaging the positive influence of human activity in designing with nature.

Subjects/Keywords: mahinga kai; landscape architecture; design with nature; kaitiakitanga; manaakitanga; 120107 Landscape Architecture

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lee, W. (2019). Weaving Mahinga Kai and Landscape Architecture: Designing with nature through people-ecology interactions. (Thesis). Lincoln University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10182/10979

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lee, Woody. “Weaving Mahinga Kai and Landscape Architecture: Designing with nature through people-ecology interactions.” 2019. Thesis, Lincoln University. Accessed December 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10182/10979.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lee, Woody. “Weaving Mahinga Kai and Landscape Architecture: Designing with nature through people-ecology interactions.” 2019. Web. 15 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Lee W. Weaving Mahinga Kai and Landscape Architecture: Designing with nature through people-ecology interactions. [Internet] [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 2019. [cited 2019 Dec 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/10979.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Lee W. Weaving Mahinga Kai and Landscape Architecture: Designing with nature through people-ecology interactions. [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/10979

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Otago

2. King, Lisa-Marie Francisca. Indigenous social work practice development: The contribution of manaakitanga to Mana-enhancing social work practice theory .

Degree: University of Otago

Manaakitanga is acknowledged as a foundational Te Ao Māori value, construct and tikanga that underpins relationships. This research thesis sought an in-depth understanding of manaakitanga as it is understood and practiced by experienced Māori social workers, and the relevance of this to indigenous social work practice development and competency to practice social work with Māori. This exploration into the development of indigenous social work practice development with Māori, by Māori, and for Māori, is grounded in a Kaupapa Māori methodology and theoretical approach, using qualitative interpretive data collection and analysis methods. One to one semi structured in-depth interviews with eight experienced Māori social work practitioners were used to gather the data, which was then thematically analysed to inform the findings. The findings of my research conclude that the influences on practitioners’ understanding and application of manaakitanga to their social work practice is founded in He Ngākau Māori –the Māori heart. It reaffirms manaakitanga is inherently tied to mana and contributes to the development of Mana-enhancing social work practice theory. For its’ integrity in social work practice to be assured, manaakitanga as a relational construct of a Māori worldview cannot be seen in isolation from the context in which it is founded. This research also identified several constraints that suppress manaakitanga, the addressing of which will encourage the expression of manaakitanga in Te Mahi Whakamana - Mana-enhancing social work practice. Finally, I conclude with the beginnings of a tentative exploration of Mana Tangata as the contextualised expression for a social worker who is competent to practice social work with Māori. Advisors/Committee Members: Eketone, Anaru (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: indigenous; indigenous social work; social work; Maori social work; Māori social work; social work practice development; manaakitanga; mana-enhancing; New Zealand; social work competency; kaupapa Maori; kaupapa Māori; indigenous social work practice theory; tikanga Māori; mātauranga; Māori; mātauranga Māori; indigenous peoples; bicultralism; te mahi whakamana; mana; tikanga; cultural competency; culturally responsive; culturally relevant; cultural competence; cultural relevance; relational; Treaty of Waitangi; world-view; kaupapa Maori theory; indigenous theory; Tiriti o Waitangi; indigenous engagement skills; Aotearoa

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

King, L. F. (n.d.). Indigenous social work practice development: The contribution of manaakitanga to Mana-enhancing social work practice theory . (Masters Thesis). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/8589

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

King, Lisa-Marie Francisca. “Indigenous social work practice development: The contribution of manaakitanga to Mana-enhancing social work practice theory .” Masters Thesis, University of Otago. Accessed December 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10523/8589.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

King, Lisa-Marie Francisca. “Indigenous social work practice development: The contribution of manaakitanga to Mana-enhancing social work practice theory .” Web. 15 Dec 2019.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

King LF. Indigenous social work practice development: The contribution of manaakitanga to Mana-enhancing social work practice theory . [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Otago; [cited 2019 Dec 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/8589.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

King LF. Indigenous social work practice development: The contribution of manaakitanga to Mana-enhancing social work practice theory . [Masters Thesis]. University of Otago; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/8589

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

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