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You searched for subject:(lipid turnover). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of North Texas

1. James, Christopher Neal. Influence of a Human Lipodystrophy Gene Homologue on Neutral Lipid Accumulation in Arabidopsis Leaves.

Degree: 2016, University of North Texas

CGI-58 is the defective gene in the human neutral lipid storage disease called Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome. This disorder causes intracellular lipid droplets to accumulate in nonadipose tissues, such as skin and blood cells. Here, disruption of the homologous CGI-58 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in the accumulation of neutral lipid droplets in mature leaves. Mass spectroscopy of isolated lipid droplets from cgi-58 loss-of-function mutants showed they contain triacylglycerols with common leaf specific fatty acids. Leaves of mature cgi-58 plants exhibited a marked increase in absolute triacylglycerol levels, more than 10-fold higher than in wild-type plants. Lipid levels in the oil-storing seeds of cgi-58 loss-of-function plants were unchanged, and unlike mutations in beta-oxidation, the cgi-58 seeds germinated and grew normally, requiring no rescue with sucrose. We conclude that the participation of CGI-58 in neutral lipid homeostasis of nonfat-storing tissues is similar, although not identical, between plant and animal species. This unique insight may have implications for designing a new generation of technologies that enhance the neutral lipid content and composition of corp plants. Advisors/Committee Members: Chapman, Kent D, Shah, Jyoti, Root, Douglas D.

Subjects/Keywords: Plant Lipid Metabolism; compartmentation; biofuels; lipid accumulation; lipid turnover; plant biomass

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

James, C. N. (2016). Influence of a Human Lipodystrophy Gene Homologue on Neutral Lipid Accumulation in Arabidopsis Leaves. (Thesis). University of North Texas. Retrieved from https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc862842/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

James, Christopher Neal. “Influence of a Human Lipodystrophy Gene Homologue on Neutral Lipid Accumulation in Arabidopsis Leaves.” 2016. Thesis, University of North Texas. Accessed October 20, 2019. https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc862842/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

James, Christopher Neal. “Influence of a Human Lipodystrophy Gene Homologue on Neutral Lipid Accumulation in Arabidopsis Leaves.” 2016. Web. 20 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

James CN. Influence of a Human Lipodystrophy Gene Homologue on Neutral Lipid Accumulation in Arabidopsis Leaves. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 2016. [cited 2019 Oct 20]. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc862842/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

James CN. Influence of a Human Lipodystrophy Gene Homologue on Neutral Lipid Accumulation in Arabidopsis Leaves. [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 2016. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc862842/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Maktabi, Mohammad H. The Role of Reversible Palmitoylation in Regulating Diverse Biological Processes.

Degree: PhD, Biology & Biomedical Sciences (Molecular Cell Biology), 2015, Washington University in St. Louis

It is well established that covalent lipid-modification of proteins can play an important role in the spatial and temporal organization of many intracellular signaling proteins. In particular, protein palmitoylation, the thioester linkage of a palmitate moiety to a cysteine residue, plays a critical role in promoting membrane binding. It also serves as a versatile sorting signal for membrane trafficking and precise microdomain partitioning. Classical studies using metabolic labeling have revealed that palmitoylation is dynamic, in which many substrates undergo palmitate cycling, and that turnover is regulated by extracellular signals. As such, the kinetics of palmitoylation cycling is dependent on the interplay between the palmitoyl transferases and thioesterases for efficient and precise localization and activity. Here, I present evidence for the regulation of GPCR signaling via protein depalmitoylation as well as the identification of a novel thioesterase that could potentially mediate this effect. Advisors/Committee Members: Kendall J Blumer, Thomas Baranski, Ron Bose, Michael Bruchas, Phyllis Hanson, Hanson Huettner.

Subjects/Keywords: depalmitoylation; lipid-modification; palmitate turnover; palmitoylation; palmitoyl transferases; thioesterase

…Blumer, Chair It is well established that covalent lipid-modification of proteins can play an… …substrates undergo palmitate cycling, and that turnover is regulated by extracellular signals. As… …were able to present compelling evidence for the in vivo role of palmitate turnover on GPCR… …lipid modification Proteins can be modified by a variety of lipid groups including myristic… …palmitoylation represent the most common types of lipid modification. A unique feature of… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Maktabi, M. H. (2015). The Role of Reversible Palmitoylation in Regulating Diverse Biological Processes. (Doctoral Dissertation). Washington University in St. Louis. Retrieved from https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/art_sci_etds/665

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Maktabi, Mohammad H. “The Role of Reversible Palmitoylation in Regulating Diverse Biological Processes.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Washington University in St. Louis. Accessed October 20, 2019. https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/art_sci_etds/665.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Maktabi, Mohammad H. “The Role of Reversible Palmitoylation in Regulating Diverse Biological Processes.” 2015. Web. 20 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Maktabi MH. The Role of Reversible Palmitoylation in Regulating Diverse Biological Processes. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Washington University in St. Louis; 2015. [cited 2019 Oct 20]. Available from: https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/art_sci_etds/665.

Council of Science Editors:

Maktabi MH. The Role of Reversible Palmitoylation in Regulating Diverse Biological Processes. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Washington University in St. Louis; 2015. Available from: https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/art_sci_etds/665

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