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You searched for subject:(lipid layer thickness). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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The Ohio State University

1. Weisenberger, Kimberly R. Tear Lipid Layer Thickness and Symptoms in Patients with Dry Eye Disease following the use of Emollient versus Non-Emollient Artificial Tears.

Degree: MS, Vision Science, 2020, The Ohio State University

Purpose: Dry eye disease is a common ocular disorder which is often managed by the use of over-the-counter (OTC) artificial tears. Many different artificial tear formulations, both emollient and non-emollient, are readily available to the public. Understanding how individual artificial tear formulations affect both the tear film and symptoms in dry eye sufferers is critical in appropriate clinical prescribing of these eye drops. This study sought to evaluate the effects of a new nano-droplet emollient artificial tear and a non-emollient artificial tear on both the tear film and symptoms of ocular dryness over time. The purpose of this study was two-fold: first, to measure the tear film lipid layer thickness (LLT) and symptoms in dry eye patients after single-dose instillation of an emollient and non-emollient eye drop, and second, to evaluate the tear LLT, tear break-up time, and symptoms of dry eye patients after four times daily-use (QID) of the emollient eye drop for one month.Methods: For Part 1, LLT and symptoms of ocular dryness were measured in a cross-over comparison after instillation of Systane Complete®, an emollient (nanoemulsion) artificial tear, and Systane Ultra®, a non-emollient artificial tear. Non-invasive keratograph break-up time (NIKBUT), LLT, and symptoms were assessed at each visit prior to drop instillation. Symptoms were assessed using a unique visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI). Following drop instillation, LLT was measured using a stroboscobic video color microscope (SVCM), a video-imaging device which captures data using interferometric principles. Tear LLT and VAS survey symptoms were measured at 15 minutes, 1 hour, 2 hours, 4 hours, and 6 hours after drop instillation. For Part 2, subjects used the emollient eye drop QID for one month. Symptoms of ocular dryness, LLT, and NIKBUT were then again evaluated. Subjects were stratified into groups of lower (<50nm) and higher LLT (≥50nm) based on baseline measurements obtained at the emollient eye drop test visit. Paired T-tests were used to determine if significant changes in LLT and symptoms occurred with instillation of either artificial tear, or at the one month follow-up.Results: 20 subjects completed the study (mean age = 45.6±7.9, 15 female). Part 1 found a significant increase in average LLT 15 minutes after emollient eye drop instillation in the overall and inferior third of the tear film for subjects with baseline LLT values <50nm. Average LLT values did not increase at any time point following use of the non-emollient eye drop. Symptoms improved up to 6 hours following instillation of both drops. Symptoms of all subjects revealed statistically significant improvement in average dryness (8.6±16.7mm) up to 6 hours, and eye fatigue (8.4±14.0mm) up to 4 hours after instillation of the emollient eye drop. Symptoms of all subjects also revealed statistically significant improvement in average dryness (9.8±19.9mm) and light sensitivity (10.3±20.5mm) up to 6 hours, and ocular discomfort (8.6±18.0mm) up to… Advisors/Committee Members: Fogt, Nicklaus (Advisor), Fogt, Jennifer (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Therapy; Dry eye disease; dry eye therapy; eye drops; artificial tears; lipid layer thickness

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Weisenberger, K. R. (2020). Tear Lipid Layer Thickness and Symptoms in Patients with Dry Eye Disease following the use of Emollient versus Non-Emollient Artificial Tears. (Masters Thesis). The Ohio State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu158694773242849

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Weisenberger, Kimberly R. “Tear Lipid Layer Thickness and Symptoms in Patients with Dry Eye Disease following the use of Emollient versus Non-Emollient Artificial Tears.” 2020. Masters Thesis, The Ohio State University. Accessed May 07, 2021. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu158694773242849.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Weisenberger, Kimberly R. “Tear Lipid Layer Thickness and Symptoms in Patients with Dry Eye Disease following the use of Emollient versus Non-Emollient Artificial Tears.” 2020. Web. 07 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Weisenberger KR. Tear Lipid Layer Thickness and Symptoms in Patients with Dry Eye Disease following the use of Emollient versus Non-Emollient Artificial Tears. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. The Ohio State University; 2020. [cited 2021 May 07]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu158694773242849.

Council of Science Editors:

Weisenberger KR. Tear Lipid Layer Thickness and Symptoms in Patients with Dry Eye Disease following the use of Emollient versus Non-Emollient Artificial Tears. [Masters Thesis]. The Ohio State University; 2020. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu158694773242849


The Ohio State University

2. Hager, Michele LynnManeca. A Study of Contact Lens Comfort in Patients Wearing Comfilcon A Soft Contact Lenses Compared to Their Habitual Soft Contact Lenses.

Degree: MS, Vision Science, 2009, The Ohio State University

Contact lens discomfort, especially contact lens-related ocular dryness, is a major cause of contact lens wear discontinuation. Many studies have evaluated different contact lens materials for their comfort in both normal patients and sufferers of contact lens-related dry eye. This study seeks to evaluate a new silicone hydrogel soft contact lens material (comfilcon A) in terms of comfort, measurable tear film parameters, and total contact lens-extracted lipid in normal and contact lens-related dry eye contact lens wearers as compared to their habitual contact lenses. Thirty four participants completed this study consisting of two visits—the first with participant wearing their habitual soft contact lenses and the second with the study contact lenses. Interferometric measurements of the pre-lens tear film thinning rate (PLTF thinning rate), the lipid layer thickness (LLT), and the initial pre-lens tear film thickness (PLTF) were recorded, the Contact Lens Dry Eye Questionnaire (CLDEQ) was peformed, and the participants’ lenses were collected for lipid analysis at each visit. The CLDEQ scores at the first study visit of the non-dry eye and dry eye group were shown to be significantly different from one another (p <0.0001). Total extracted lipid amounts showed a significant difference for the non-dry eye group between the first and second study visits (p = 0.01) but not for the dry eye group (p = 0.10). A significant correlation was found between LLT and PLTF thinning rate for the first visit (r = 0.39, p = 0.03), but not for the second visit (r = 0.14, p = 0.43). A significant correlation was found between CLDEQ score and PLTF thinning rate for the dry eye group (rs = -0.55, p = 0.03) but not for the non-dry eye group (rs = 0.11, p = 0.71) at the first visit. A significant correlation was found between CLDEQ score and LLT for the non-dry eye group (rs = -0.53, p = 0.04) but not for the dry eye group (rs = -0.18, p = 0.53) at the first visit. A significant correlation was found between contact lens-extracted lipid quantity and number of days for which the habitual contact lenses were worn (r = 0.37, p = 0.03). One month of wear of comfilcon A silicone hydrogel contact lenses did not significantly improve subjective dryness symptom severity in either normals or contact lens-related dry eye sufferers as compared to their habitual lens materials. Further research is needed to determine a quantifiable tear film parameter or other marker by which to diagnose or grade contact lens-related dry eye and is also needed to find or develop a soft contact lens material that can be comfortably worn by contact lens-related dry eye sufferers. Advisors/Committee Members: Nichols, Jason (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Ophthalmology; dry eye; comfilcon A; interferometry; lipid layer thickness; pre-lens tear film thinning rate; pre-lens tear film thickness; contact lens dry eye questionnaire

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hager, M. L. (2009). A Study of Contact Lens Comfort in Patients Wearing Comfilcon A Soft Contact Lenses Compared to Their Habitual Soft Contact Lenses. (Masters Thesis). The Ohio State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1243711014

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hager, Michele LynnManeca. “A Study of Contact Lens Comfort in Patients Wearing Comfilcon A Soft Contact Lenses Compared to Their Habitual Soft Contact Lenses.” 2009. Masters Thesis, The Ohio State University. Accessed May 07, 2021. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1243711014.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hager, Michele LynnManeca. “A Study of Contact Lens Comfort in Patients Wearing Comfilcon A Soft Contact Lenses Compared to Their Habitual Soft Contact Lenses.” 2009. Web. 07 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Hager ML. A Study of Contact Lens Comfort in Patients Wearing Comfilcon A Soft Contact Lenses Compared to Their Habitual Soft Contact Lenses. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. The Ohio State University; 2009. [cited 2021 May 07]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1243711014.

Council of Science Editors:

Hager ML. A Study of Contact Lens Comfort in Patients Wearing Comfilcon A Soft Contact Lenses Compared to Their Habitual Soft Contact Lenses. [Masters Thesis]. The Ohio State University; 2009. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1243711014

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