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You searched for subject:(letter sound correspondences). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Penn State University

1. Benedek-Wood, Elizabeth Ashley. EFFECTS OF ADAPTED INSTRUCTION ON THE ACQUISITION OF LETTER-SOUND CORRESPONDENCES BY YOUNG CHILDREN WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS AND COMPLEX COMMUNICATION NEEDS .

Degree: 2010, Penn State University

Reading is one of the most critical skills taught in schools (Heller, Fredrick, Tumlin, & Brineman, 2002). Individuals who acquire literacy skills are more likely to experience success in school, and to obtain and maintain employment (Adams, 1990; Light & McNaughton, 2009b; Slavin, Karweit, & Madden, 1989). It is therefore an educational priority to address reading instruction for individuals with complex communication needs (i.e., individuals with limited speech), many of whom do not acquire basic literacy skills (Light & McNaughton, 2009b; Koppenhaver & Yoder, 1992). Considering that as many as 50% of individuals with autism do not develop functional speech (Lord & Paul, 1997; Mesibov, Adams, & Klinger, 1997), this is a population of individuals who are at-risk for experiencing reading challenges (Nation, Clarke, Wright, & Williams, 2006). The primary goal of this study was to investigate the impact of adapted instruction on teaching letter-sound correspondences to young learners with autism spectrum disorders and complex communication needs. A multiple-probe multiple baseline research design across participants was used to evaluate the effects of instruction on the acquisition of letter-sound correspondences by three young children with autism spectrum disorders and complex communication needs. All three children (ages 3 to 5) reached criterion for identifying the letter-sound correspondences targeted during instruction. All three children also provided evidence of maintenance and generalization of letter-sound correspondence skills. Results, social validity, educational implications, and future research directions are discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr David Mc Naughton, Dissertation Advisor/Co-Advisor, David Brent Mcnaughton, Committee Chair/Co-Chair, Richard M Kubina Jr., Committee Member, Linda H. Mason, Committee Member, David Lee, Committee Member, Janice Catherine Light, Committee Member.

Subjects/Keywords: complex communication needs; letter-sound correspondences; autism

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Benedek-Wood, E. A. (2010). EFFECTS OF ADAPTED INSTRUCTION ON THE ACQUISITION OF LETTER-SOUND CORRESPONDENCES BY YOUNG CHILDREN WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS AND COMPLEX COMMUNICATION NEEDS . (Thesis). Penn State University. Retrieved from https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/11286

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Benedek-Wood, Elizabeth Ashley. “EFFECTS OF ADAPTED INSTRUCTION ON THE ACQUISITION OF LETTER-SOUND CORRESPONDENCES BY YOUNG CHILDREN WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS AND COMPLEX COMMUNICATION NEEDS .” 2010. Thesis, Penn State University. Accessed October 24, 2020. https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/11286.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Benedek-Wood, Elizabeth Ashley. “EFFECTS OF ADAPTED INSTRUCTION ON THE ACQUISITION OF LETTER-SOUND CORRESPONDENCES BY YOUNG CHILDREN WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS AND COMPLEX COMMUNICATION NEEDS .” 2010. Web. 24 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Benedek-Wood EA. EFFECTS OF ADAPTED INSTRUCTION ON THE ACQUISITION OF LETTER-SOUND CORRESPONDENCES BY YOUNG CHILDREN WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS AND COMPLEX COMMUNICATION NEEDS . [Internet] [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2010. [cited 2020 Oct 24]. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/11286.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Benedek-Wood EA. EFFECTS OF ADAPTED INSTRUCTION ON THE ACQUISITION OF LETTER-SOUND CORRESPONDENCES BY YOUNG CHILDREN WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS AND COMPLEX COMMUNICATION NEEDS . [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2010. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/11286

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Penn State University

2. Yorke, April M. The Effects of Explicit Instruction in Letter-sound Correspondences with Children with Complex Communication Needs in Pairs with Peers.

Degree: 2017, Penn State University

This study investigated the effects of explicit instruction on the acquisition of letter-sound correspondences for children with complex communication needs (CCN) in small groups with peers with intellectual or developmental disabilities. The independent variable was the explicit instruction intervention. Each session consisted of an introduction to the target letter using letter-sound books, practice locating the target letter among four letter-sound cards (i.e., the target letter and three foils), and discrimination practice (beginning with the second targeted letter-sound). Results of the study provide mixed evidence regarding the overall effectiveness of the small group intervention. Of the six initial participants (three children with CCN and intellectual developmental disabilities and three peers who were children with intellectual developmental disabilities), four made progress in learning of letter-sound correspondences. The study was designed as a multiple-baseline across letter-sets design with three replications of the treatment effect for each participant with CCN. Due to time constraints, only three of the six initial participants completed letter-set one and continued to letter-set two. Consequently, experimental control was compromised. On average, participants in the current study required more total instructional time to learn letter-sound correspondences in pairs than in similar studies using similar explicit instruction methods to teach individual children (Benedek Wood, 2010; Caron, 2016). However, as the intervention was provided in pairs, the number of trials provided to each participant was divided between participants. For participants who made progress that can be attributed to the intervention, the current study required a lower average number of trials per letter-sound correspondence than in similar studies (Benedek Wood, 2010; Caron, 2016). Most participants who made progress in the current study required a substantial time investment to acquire the first letter-sound correspondence (i.e., averaging approximately 220 minutes of instruction, ranging from 100 – 320 minutes), but rapidly acquired subsequent letter-sounds—requiring approximately the same amount of time and a substantially lower number of trials than participants in Benedek Wood (2010). This research contributes significantly to the field in that it is the first to identify best practice procedures for small groups and integrate those into literacy intervention for children with CCN. Advisors/Committee Members: Janice C. Light, Dissertation Advisor/Co-Advisor, Janice C. Light, Committee Chair/Co-Chair, Kathryn D.R. Drager, Committee Member, Carol A. Miller, Committee Member, David B. McNaughton, Outside Member.

Subjects/Keywords: complex communication needs; augmentative and alternative communication; autism spectrum disorder; reading; ALL curriculum; explicit instruction; letter-sound correspondences; literacy; intellectual disability; developmental delay; cortical visual impairment

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Yorke, A. M. (2017). The Effects of Explicit Instruction in Letter-sound Correspondences with Children with Complex Communication Needs in Pairs with Peers. (Thesis). Penn State University. Retrieved from https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/13676amg294

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Yorke, April M. “The Effects of Explicit Instruction in Letter-sound Correspondences with Children with Complex Communication Needs in Pairs with Peers.” 2017. Thesis, Penn State University. Accessed October 24, 2020. https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/13676amg294.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Yorke, April M. “The Effects of Explicit Instruction in Letter-sound Correspondences with Children with Complex Communication Needs in Pairs with Peers.” 2017. Web. 24 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Yorke AM. The Effects of Explicit Instruction in Letter-sound Correspondences with Children with Complex Communication Needs in Pairs with Peers. [Internet] [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2017. [cited 2020 Oct 24]. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/13676amg294.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Yorke AM. The Effects of Explicit Instruction in Letter-sound Correspondences with Children with Complex Communication Needs in Pairs with Peers. [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2017. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/13676amg294

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


The Ohio State University

3. Luu, Cuong (Ken) Thoi. Effects of Joint-Control Training on Producing Letter-Sound Bi-directionality in Children with Autism.

Degree: PhD, ED Physical Activities and Educational Services, 2009, The Ohio State University

The current investigation employed a multiple-baseline design to evaluate the effects of joint-control training as a method of phonics instruction. Three children with autism participated in this study, two males (ages 6 and 9) and a female (age 8). The participants were exposed to two types of instruction (i.e., tact training and joint-control training). In tact training, participants were presented with a sound card randomly until all four sound cards (Set 1) were presented 10 times in a given session (i.e., a total of 40 trials). In each trial, the experimenter presented a sound card to the participant and asked, “What sound?” If the participant emitted the correct sound, the experimenter delivered praise and a reinforcer. If the participant emitted the incorrect sound, the experimenter provided up to three additional prompts (i.e., “The sound is ____. What sound?”) before moving on to the subsequent trial. In joint-control training, participants were randomly presented a letter sound prior to being presented with a corresponding sound card randomly until all four sound cards (Set 2) were presented 10 times in a given session. The experimenter presented a letter sound and immediately after the participant imitated the sound, the experimenter presented the sound card to the participant and asked “What sound?” If the participant emitted the correct sound, the experimenter delivered praise and a reinforcer. Three additional prompts were provided if the participant did not imitate the sound after the experimenter presented a letter sound and/or if the participant did not emit the correct sound after the experimenter presented a sound card and asked “What sound?” A probe session was conducted immediately after each tact and joint-control training session. Probe sessions were identical to the training sessions except that no additional prompts were given. Results showed that both tact training and joint-control training were effective in producing letter-sound bi-directionality, indicating that both methods may be used for phonics instruction for children with autism. Furthermore, teachers who completed the social validity questionnaires reported that the goals, procedures, and outcomes were acceptable and important. Advisors/Committee Members: Konrad, Moira (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Education; Joint-control; Tact; children with autism; phonics instruction; reading instruction; bi-directionality; letter-sound correspondences

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Luu, C. (. T. (2009). Effects of Joint-Control Training on Producing Letter-Sound Bi-directionality in Children with Autism. (Doctoral Dissertation). The Ohio State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1249920604

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Luu, Cuong (Ken) Thoi. “Effects of Joint-Control Training on Producing Letter-Sound Bi-directionality in Children with Autism.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, The Ohio State University. Accessed October 24, 2020. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1249920604.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Luu, Cuong (Ken) Thoi. “Effects of Joint-Control Training on Producing Letter-Sound Bi-directionality in Children with Autism.” 2009. Web. 24 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Luu C(T. Effects of Joint-Control Training on Producing Letter-Sound Bi-directionality in Children with Autism. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. The Ohio State University; 2009. [cited 2020 Oct 24]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1249920604.

Council of Science Editors:

Luu C(T. Effects of Joint-Control Training on Producing Letter-Sound Bi-directionality in Children with Autism. [Doctoral Dissertation]. The Ohio State University; 2009. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1249920604

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