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You searched for subject:(kokutai). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Cornell University

1. DuBois, Jeffrey. Interpreting Nationality In Postwar Japan: “Disrespectful” Representation Of The Emperor.

Degree: PhD, East Asian Literature, 2013, Cornell University

This dissertation aims to understand the articulation of nationality in postwar Japan by looking at literary texts that theorize the nature of the emperor and "emperor system" (tennōsei) as a phenomenon specific to the postwar itself. I analyze texts that comment on the nature of "disrespect" toward the emperor, and in some cases perform that very disrespect, which I argue is ultimately the deconstruction of the emperor system itself. The texts under consideration were written at two points in time: the immediate postwar (around 1946) and the time marked by protests of the renewed U.S.-Japan Security Treaty in 1960. I consider these points in time as "discursive spaces" that the texts capture by bringing together a constellation of images and forces, and that allow for productive cross-reading of the texts. Chapter One introduces some of the theoretical premises for the project, and emphasizes my focus on the discursive representation of the emperor as opposed to the tendency of scholarship to focus on the individual emperor as historical and political agent. Chapter Two traces the invention of the postwar emperor system to narratives deployed to project the image of a human and sympathetic emperor who at once broke with the past and represented absolute continuity with it. C hapter Three turns to Nakano Shigeharu's postwar writings on the emperor that show the contradictions inherent in the "emperor system" itself as well as the role of media and society in reproducing it discursively. The narrator of his text, Goshaku no Saku, believes that the only means to liberate the emperor from the emperor system is to take the notion of the "human" emperor to its logical conclusion: "elevate" the emperor to the status of citizen. Chapter Four argues that Sakaguchi Ango's postwar writing on the emperor leads to very similar conclusions, but frames it as "descent" to humanity. Chapter Five considers the context of 1960 in which the postwar narrative of the peaceful emperor became challenged by remilitarization a nd the renewed Security Treaty; the image of the emperor was mobilized not to unify opposing views, but rend them apart. I argue that Fukazawa Shichirō's Fūryū Mutan depicts this very disunity. However, reaction to the text as event shifted the debate from literary representation of the emperor to the ways that the terrorism circumvents free speech. In Chapter Six, I argue that Mishima capitalizes on this shift and creates a moral equivalence between terrorism and political revolt by defining a notion of militaristic glory as the protection of Japanese culture. In the process, he designs a theory of emperor system that reproduces a foreign fantasy. Chapter Seven argues for the relevance of asking today the same questions raised by the authors. ii Advisors/Committee Members: Sakai, Naoki (chair), Sakai, Naoki (chair), de Bary, Brett (committee member), Hirano, Katsuya (committee member), de Bary, Brett (committee member), Hirano, Katsuya (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: nationality; kokutai; emperor system

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APA (6th Edition):

DuBois, J. (2013). Interpreting Nationality In Postwar Japan: “Disrespectful” Representation Of The Emperor. (Doctoral Dissertation). Cornell University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1813/34260

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

DuBois, Jeffrey. “Interpreting Nationality In Postwar Japan: “Disrespectful” Representation Of The Emperor.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Cornell University. Accessed January 17, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1813/34260.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

DuBois, Jeffrey. “Interpreting Nationality In Postwar Japan: “Disrespectful” Representation Of The Emperor.” 2013. Web. 17 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

DuBois J. Interpreting Nationality In Postwar Japan: “Disrespectful” Representation Of The Emperor. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Cornell University; 2013. [cited 2021 Jan 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/34260.

Council of Science Editors:

DuBois J. Interpreting Nationality In Postwar Japan: “Disrespectful” Representation Of The Emperor. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Cornell University; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/34260


University of Tasmania

2. Eaves-Young, VL. The diary of Tamura Yoshikazu : writing under the gaze of the kokutai during the Japanese Imperial Army New Guinea campaign.

Degree: 2011, University of Tasmania

The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the influence of the social context of imperial Japan on the diary of Tamura Yoshikazu, a member of the Japanese Imperial Army stationed in New Guinea from January 1943 until his presumed death at the end of the same year. As one of the few remaining original diaries from the New Guinea theatre of the Pacific War, this material offers a unique opportunity to analyse the processes by which an ordinary foot soldier of Imperial Japan interpreted the extreme tropical war zone circumstances to which he was despatched. The thesis begins with a discussion of the discursive environment in which Tamura’s diary was produced, referred to throughout the document as “kokutai discourse” in acknowledgement of the influence of the notion of kokutai – literally “body of the nation” but generally translated as “national polity” – on the socio‐political and cultural environment of pre‐war Japan. A major tension that drives the narrative of the diary is the conflict between Tamura’s desire as a subject of Imperial Japan to follow kokutai teachings and lay down his life in the name of the Emperor and the contradictory desire to express a personal sense of self. In resolving this tension, Tamura often referenced the seasonal markers and the familiar natural imagery of the homeland, Japan, as a means of remaining grounded in the alien surrounds of the tropics. Memories of more favourable experiences as a soldier enabled Tamura to fantasise about a noble and glorious death.

Subjects/Keywords: kokutai; self; death; war diary; Pacific war; Emperor; Imperial Japanese army; nature

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Eaves-Young, V. (2011). The diary of Tamura Yoshikazu : writing under the gaze of the kokutai during the Japanese Imperial Army New Guinea campaign. (Thesis). University of Tasmania. Retrieved from https://eprints.utas.edu.au/12435/1/front.pdf ; https://eprints.utas.edu.au/12435/2/whole.pdf

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Eaves-Young, VL. “The diary of Tamura Yoshikazu : writing under the gaze of the kokutai during the Japanese Imperial Army New Guinea campaign.” 2011. Thesis, University of Tasmania. Accessed January 17, 2021. https://eprints.utas.edu.au/12435/1/front.pdf ; https://eprints.utas.edu.au/12435/2/whole.pdf.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Eaves-Young, VL. “The diary of Tamura Yoshikazu : writing under the gaze of the kokutai during the Japanese Imperial Army New Guinea campaign.” 2011. Web. 17 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Eaves-Young V. The diary of Tamura Yoshikazu : writing under the gaze of the kokutai during the Japanese Imperial Army New Guinea campaign. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Tasmania; 2011. [cited 2021 Jan 17]. Available from: https://eprints.utas.edu.au/12435/1/front.pdf ; https://eprints.utas.edu.au/12435/2/whole.pdf.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Eaves-Young V. The diary of Tamura Yoshikazu : writing under the gaze of the kokutai during the Japanese Imperial Army New Guinea campaign. [Thesis]. University of Tasmania; 2011. Available from: https://eprints.utas.edu.au/12435/1/front.pdf ; https://eprints.utas.edu.au/12435/2/whole.pdf

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Vrabel, Shane. Preserving Imperial Sovereignty in the Changing Political Order of Prewar Japan.

Degree: 2013, Buffalo State College

During the nineteenth century, several Western powers began to establish a presence in East Asia through the use of gunboat diplomacy. In 1853, United States Commodore Matthew C. Perry arrived on Japanese shores intent on forcing the ruling Tokugawa Shogunate to end its policy of sakoku (seclusion) and interact with the West through trade. Angered over the policies of the Tokugawa Shogunate, the han (domains) of Chōshū and Satsuma decided to launch the Boshin Civil War by instigating rebellion against the shogun. The military forces of Chōshū and Satsuma eventually captured the imperial capital of Kyoto and the young Prince Mutsuhito in 1867. The following year, Prince Mutsuhito ascended to the imperial throne and took the posthumous title of Emperor Meiji, and announced that imperial rule had returned to the country. The leadership of Chōshū and Satsuma decided to learn from the West and adopted several components of Western civilization in order to strengthen the country by fundamentally transforming its economics, politics, and society. During the 1880s, that leadership was crippled in a debate over constitutionalism, and the role with which the Emperor was to have in the new political order. Those leaders who favored imperial over popular sovereignty eventually prevailed in the debate resulting in the creation of a political structure that preserved imperial sovereignty. In 1890, the Empire of Japan was officially recognized throughout the West when it adopted its own constitution. While great progress had been achieved during the reign of Emperor Meiji, the high-water mark for the development of party politics occurred during the reign of Emperor Taishō. Unlike his predecessor’s, the early reign of Emperor Shōwa was marked with acts of political terrorism and international upheavals which threatened to uproot the Meiji political structure. As a result of this, mainstream politicians turned to the Imperial Japanese military and radical bureaucrats to enact reforms that would preserve the political system in the face of such turbulence.

Subjects/Keywords: Emperor Meiji; Ito Hirobumi; Meiji Constitution; Kokutai; Japanese Imperialism; Ultranationalism; Asian History; History; Political History

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Vrabel, S. (2013). Preserving Imperial Sovereignty in the Changing Political Order of Prewar Japan. (Thesis). Buffalo State College. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.buffalostate.edu/history_theses/22

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Vrabel, Shane. “Preserving Imperial Sovereignty in the Changing Political Order of Prewar Japan.” 2013. Thesis, Buffalo State College. Accessed January 17, 2021. https://digitalcommons.buffalostate.edu/history_theses/22.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Vrabel, Shane. “Preserving Imperial Sovereignty in the Changing Political Order of Prewar Japan.” 2013. Web. 17 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Vrabel S. Preserving Imperial Sovereignty in the Changing Political Order of Prewar Japan. [Internet] [Thesis]. Buffalo State College; 2013. [cited 2021 Jan 17]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.buffalostate.edu/history_theses/22.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Vrabel S. Preserving Imperial Sovereignty in the Changing Political Order of Prewar Japan. [Thesis]. Buffalo State College; 2013. Available from: https://digitalcommons.buffalostate.edu/history_theses/22

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.