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You searched for subject:(knowledge omissions). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Southern California

1. Canillas, Eko Natividad. The use of cognitive task analysis for identifying the critical information omitted when experts describe surgical procedures.

Degree: EdD, Education, 2010, University of Southern California

Evidence in research suggests experts omit 70% of procedural steps when describing a surgical procedure. Additionally, prior knowledge of a procedure may have an affect on the percentage of information omitted when describing a procedure. To examine this, the current study used CTA methods to conduct semi-structured interviews with six subject matter experts describing a central venous catheter (CVC) placement procedure. Quantitative methods were used to analyze data regarding the amount of information omitted when describing a CVC and the amount of information omitted as it relates to prior knowledge of the procedure. Study findings did not confirm experts omit 70% of procedural steps, but approximately 30% of action steps and 35% of decision steps were omitted when describing a CVC. Failure to confirm prior estimates of omissions in existing research may be due to study limitations including (a) “rolling-up” steps of CTA items to achieve better organization in the gold standard for data analysis (b) issues with crediting SMEs and (c) challenges to SME participation. Moreover, participants omitted a lower percentage of action and decisions steps when describing a CVC, yet possessed more prior knowledge of the procedure. This was compared to data of a similar study using an open cricothyrotomy (CRIC) procedure where participants had less prior knowledge of the CRIC, but more knowledge omissions. This outcome may stem from the type of prior knowledge examined in this study and heightened awareness resulting from institutional responses targeting the CVC. Future research in the field of CTA is discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Clark, Richard E. (Committee Chair), Yates, Kenneth A. (Committee Member), Sullivan, Maura E. (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: knowledge omissions; CTA methods; cognitive task analysis methods; surgical subject matter experts

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Canillas, E. N. (2010). The use of cognitive task analysis for identifying the critical information omitted when experts describe surgical procedures. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/309759/rec/7370

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Canillas, Eko Natividad. “The use of cognitive task analysis for identifying the critical information omitted when experts describe surgical procedures.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/309759/rec/7370.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Canillas, Eko Natividad. “The use of cognitive task analysis for identifying the critical information omitted when experts describe surgical procedures.” 2010. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Canillas EN. The use of cognitive task analysis for identifying the critical information omitted when experts describe surgical procedures. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2010. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/309759/rec/7370.

Council of Science Editors:

Canillas EN. The use of cognitive task analysis for identifying the critical information omitted when experts describe surgical procedures. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2010. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/309759/rec/7370

2. Olayinka, Raymond Afolarin. A Knowledge Management Framework for Reducing the Cost of Poor Quality on Construction Projects.

Degree: 2015, University of Wolverhampton

Knowledge management (KM) implementation strategies on construction projects can reap benefits such as improved performance and continuous improvement yet many projects are characterised by inefficiencies, repetition of mistakes and lack of lessons learnt. Poor skills, design changes, errors and omissions contribute to the internal failure cost element of the Cost of Poor Quality (COPQ) while the resultant effect of client dissatisfaction contributes to the external failure cost. COPQ is prevalent regardless of project type and has been found to be over 10% of total project cost in certain cases. While the need to reduce COPQ is definite, it is uncertain what impact KM has in its reduction. The aims of the research therefore are twofold (i) to investigate the impact of KM in reducing COPQ on construction projects (ii) to develop a KM framework for reducing COPQ on construction projects. A mixed method approach was adopted for the research with an exploratory sequential research design utilising both qualitative and quantitative inquiries to address the research aims. Semi-structured interviews and questionnaire survey were selected as the method for qualitative and quantitative data collection respectively. The interviews were conducted with 25 industry experts involved in KM strategies for large construction organisations across UK to obtain data, based on their experiences and expertise on projects, which were then analysed using content analysis. The output from the analysis yielded variables and working hypotheses which were tested through the questionnaire survey. Further data were obtained from 114 survey respondents who have iii been mostly involved in KM initiatives for large construction organisations across UK. The data was analysed using descriptive statistics. From the interpretation of the entire qualitative and quantitative data, it was found that KM can be complex and difficult to manage within organisations and on projects. Although KM was perceived to have positive impact in reducing COPQ, organisations did not, and could not quantify COPQ neither could they measure the extent of the impact of KM on COPQ. Causal links were found between COPQ elements i.e. errors and omissions, design changes and poor skills, contrary to the theoretical suggestion of being mutually exclusive. It was found that KM currently has not been optimised to reduce COPQ due to a number of barriers. Optimising KM to reduce COPQ therefore involves overcoming the barriers as follows: develop performance metrics to assess the impact of KM on COPQ on projects; appoint knowledge champions to facilitate KM activities to reduce COPQ; adopt a positive organisational culture towards KM; allocate adequate time and budget for KM activities on projects; select procurement strategies that support and facilitate KM. A KM framework for reducing COPQ on construction projects was developed as an output of the research and evaluated by industry practitioners. It can be concluded that the optimisation of KM can significantly reduce COPQ. A key…

Subjects/Keywords: Construction Projects; Cost of Poor Quality; Design Changes; Errors and Omissions; Knowledge Integration; Knowledge Management; Poor Skills; Quality Costs; Quality Management

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Olayinka, R. A. (2015). A Knowledge Management Framework for Reducing the Cost of Poor Quality on Construction Projects. (Thesis). University of Wolverhampton. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2436/619040

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Olayinka, Raymond Afolarin. “A Knowledge Management Framework for Reducing the Cost of Poor Quality on Construction Projects.” 2015. Thesis, University of Wolverhampton. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2436/619040.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Olayinka, Raymond Afolarin. “A Knowledge Management Framework for Reducing the Cost of Poor Quality on Construction Projects.” 2015. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Olayinka RA. A Knowledge Management Framework for Reducing the Cost of Poor Quality on Construction Projects. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Wolverhampton; 2015. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/619040.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Olayinka RA. A Knowledge Management Framework for Reducing the Cost of Poor Quality on Construction Projects. [Thesis]. University of Wolverhampton; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/619040

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Southern California

3. Tolano-Leveque, Maryann. Using cognitive task analysis to determine the percentage of critical information that experts omit when describing a surgical procedure.

Degree: EdD, Education (Counseling Psychology), 2010, University of Southern California

This study used cognitive task analysis (CTA) knowledge elicitation strategies to find the percentage and type of information that experts omit when describing how to perform a surgical procedure. CTA is a method by which a trained analyst can extract and capture information that has been automated and is non-conscious to an expert. This information includes critical decision points and judgments involved in the expert’s performance of the procedure. Based on the current research literature, the hypothesis for this study was that surgical experts would omit approximately 70% of the critical decision steps necessary to perform the Open Cricothyrotomy and Central Venous Catheter surgical procedures. More specifically, this study sought to determine if there is a difference in knowledge omissions based on the experts’ prior knowledge of the procedures.; This descriptive study took a mixed-methods approach. Qualitative methods were used to conduct semi-structured interviews while quantitative methods were used. to analyze the data by using frequency counts to determine how much information was omitted when compared with the final, expert-approved, “gold standard.” The “gold standard” is an aggregate of the information elicited from six medical faculty at the University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine. Results showed that experts for the Open Cricothyrotomy surgical procedure omitted 76.92% of the decision steps, while experts for the Central Venous Catheter procedure omitted 34.52% of the decision steps. Limitations of the study and implications for future research and task complexity are discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Clark, Richard E. (Committee Chair), Yates, Kenneth A. (Committee Member), Sullivan, Maura E. (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: cognitive task analysis; CTA; psychology; surgical training; education; open cricothyrotomy; central venous line placement; surgery; teaching; University of Southern California; USC; Keck School of Medicine; decision steps; Maryann Tolano-Leveque; Dr. Richard Clark; knowledge omissions; gold standard; subject matter experts

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Tolano-Leveque, M. (2010). Using cognitive task analysis to determine the percentage of critical information that experts omit when describing a surgical procedure. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/351724/rec/7747

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tolano-Leveque, Maryann. “Using cognitive task analysis to determine the percentage of critical information that experts omit when describing a surgical procedure.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/351724/rec/7747.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tolano-Leveque, Maryann. “Using cognitive task analysis to determine the percentage of critical information that experts omit when describing a surgical procedure.” 2010. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Tolano-Leveque M. Using cognitive task analysis to determine the percentage of critical information that experts omit when describing a surgical procedure. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2010. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/351724/rec/7747.

Council of Science Editors:

Tolano-Leveque M. Using cognitive task analysis to determine the percentage of critical information that experts omit when describing a surgical procedure. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2010. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/351724/rec/7747

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