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You searched for subject:(intravascular volume status). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Michigan

1. Belmont, Barry. Multimodal Non-Invasive Hemodynamic Monitoring.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2016, University of Michigan

Many medical conditions require health care providers to make rapid and accu- rate assessments of a patients hemodynamics to diagnose and guide treatment. Of the parameters that encompass hemodynamic evaluation (such as heart rate and blood pressure), one remains woefully measured: intravascular volume status. A measure of how much blood a subject has with which to perfuse oxygen, deliver nutrients, and remove wastes, volume status lays the foundation of many types of fluid based treatments for the acutely and critically ill in emergency rooms and in- tensive cares units to the chronically ill of cardiovascular and dialysis centers. Yet for all its physiological importance, many current assessments of volume status and responsiveness have a predictive power around the level of a coin flip. This work seeks to remedy this dire situation by improving a technique already utilized at the bedside (ultrasound measurement of inferior vena cava collapsibility) and introducing another that could be used through all echelons of care (impedimetric intravascular volume evaluation). Specifically, three major accomplishments were achieved: (1) an open-source software toolbox was developed to help clinicians and researchers rigorously evaluate vessel strain, stress, and wall shear; (2) a novel bioimpedance technique was demonstrated in several patient populations; and (3) a wearable electronic device was created to continuously measure a subject’s vol- ume status. Such a multimodal approach to hemodynamic monitoring serves the needs of both physicians and their patients across many clinical environments and ought to improve outcomes. Advisors/Committee Members: Shih, Albert J (committee member), Okwudire, Chinedum Emmanuel (committee member), Bull, Joseph L (committee member), Ward, Kevin Ralph (committee member), Weitzel(iii), William F (committee member), Xu, Zhen (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: hemodynamics; intravascular volume status; bioimpedance; ultrasound; wearable electronics; Biomedical Engineering; Engineering

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Belmont, B. (2016). Multimodal Non-Invasive Hemodynamic Monitoring. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/120849

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Belmont, Barry. “Multimodal Non-Invasive Hemodynamic Monitoring.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed September 24, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/120849.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Belmont, Barry. “Multimodal Non-Invasive Hemodynamic Monitoring.” 2016. Web. 24 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Belmont B. Multimodal Non-Invasive Hemodynamic Monitoring. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2016. [cited 2019 Sep 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/120849.

Council of Science Editors:

Belmont B. Multimodal Non-Invasive Hemodynamic Monitoring. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/120849


Edith Cowan University

2. Steinwandel, Ulrich. Ultrasound measurements on the inferior vena cava by renal nursing staff for assessment and management of intravascular volume status in haemodialysis patients.

Degree: 2018, Edith Cowan University

Title: Ultrasound measurements on the inferior vena cava (IVC-US) by renal nursing staff for assessment and management of intravascular volume status in haemodialysis patients. Aims: The primary aim of this thesis was to provide evidence that renal nurses could safely and efficiently perform IVC-US on haemodialysis patients to obtain objective assessment of intravascular volume status and potentially reduce adverse events and morbidity. The secondary aims for this study were: (1) conduct a systematic literature review to identify evidence if renal nurses have previously used this method for intravascular volume assessment; (2) teach a renal nurse through a staged educational programme, guided by a medically trained ultrasonographer, a sonologist, to gain competency in ultrasound image acquisition and interpretation of the scans; (3) measure the prevalence of any form of intradialytic hypotension in a satellite haemodialysis clinic over a three-month period and (4) attain concurrent IVC-US and bioimpedance spectroscopy measurements on 30 patients during their haemodialysis treatment and to compare these findings with their intravascular volume status using the traditional clinical nursing assessment method. Materials and Methods: To achieve this primary aim, this thesis was separated into multiple phases. First, a systematic literature review of medical and nursing databases was performed to summarise the use of IVC-US in haemodialysis patients by renal nurses. The second phase involved a retrospective data analysis, where the prevalence rate of nurse-documented fluid related intradialytic hypotensive events was measured and a Generalised Estimating Equation (GEE) model was used to predict the likelihood of any form of intradialytic hypotension or postdialytic overhydration. In the next phase a four-step educational programme was developed in collaboration with an expert sonologist, guiding the renal nurse through the process of skill acquisition and accurate fluid assessment based on nurse-performed IVC-US scans. Following this phase, and after receiving theoretical training and performing 100 proctored scans, the renal nurse then performed 60 IVC-US scans independently, which were subsequently assessed by two sonologists, resulting in a cross-sectional interrater study, confirming competency. The final phase of the thesis consisted of a simulative pilot study, where 30 haemodialysis patients were assessed during three intradialytic moments of a single session on their intravascular volume status with IVC-US. Results: The systematic literature review revealed that there is a paucity of knowledge regarding renal nurses and IVC-US. The 3-month data analysis has shown that intradialytic hypotension (IDH) was still the most common adverse intradialytic event with 13.1% of all treatments affected. The renal nurse mastered the educational programme and was deemed competent by the experts. Finally, the simulative pilot study revealed that if IVC-US had been performed and indicated intravascular hypovolemia, patients had a…

Subjects/Keywords: haemodialysis; renal nurses; intradialytic hypotension; ultrasound inferior vena cava; nursing competency; interrater reliability; intravascular volume status; point of care ultrasound; symptomatic hypotension; asymptomatic hypotension; overhydration; fluid overload; satellite dialysis; clinical skills; fluid assessment; hydration status; nurse education; nursing skills; prevention; Analytical, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Techniques and Equipment; Nephrology; Nursing

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Steinwandel, U. (2018). Ultrasound measurements on the inferior vena cava by renal nursing staff for assessment and management of intravascular volume status in haemodialysis patients. (Thesis). Edith Cowan University. Retrieved from https://ro.ecu.edu.au/theses/2152

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Steinwandel, Ulrich. “Ultrasound measurements on the inferior vena cava by renal nursing staff for assessment and management of intravascular volume status in haemodialysis patients.” 2018. Thesis, Edith Cowan University. Accessed September 24, 2019. https://ro.ecu.edu.au/theses/2152.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Steinwandel, Ulrich. “Ultrasound measurements on the inferior vena cava by renal nursing staff for assessment and management of intravascular volume status in haemodialysis patients.” 2018. Web. 24 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Steinwandel U. Ultrasound measurements on the inferior vena cava by renal nursing staff for assessment and management of intravascular volume status in haemodialysis patients. [Internet] [Thesis]. Edith Cowan University; 2018. [cited 2019 Sep 24]. Available from: https://ro.ecu.edu.au/theses/2152.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Steinwandel U. Ultrasound measurements on the inferior vena cava by renal nursing staff for assessment and management of intravascular volume status in haemodialysis patients. [Thesis]. Edith Cowan University; 2018. Available from: https://ro.ecu.edu.au/theses/2152

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.