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You searched for subject:(international student orientation). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Northeastern University

1. Dixon, Beth Anne. Improving the social, linguistic, and academic success of Chinese international students.

Degree: EdD, School of Education, 2014, Northeastern University

Students from China experience greater levels of difficulty in the transition to American higher education compared to domestic students and other international students. They struggle with language issues, as well as social and academic acculturation challenges. A pathway program, developed in 2009 by a consortium of American colleges and universities, aimed to provide a transitional path to higher education in the U.S. for Chinese students. Students begin their program in China for fall and spring terms, and those who successfully complete those terms arrive in the United States for a Summer Bridge program aimed at acclimating students to life at an American university. This qualitative program evaluation examined faculty, staff and student experience in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the Summer Bridge program in the transition process of Chinese students to American higher education. The study fills a gap in the literature on the benefits of extended orientation programs for Chinese international students. Historical documentation; course syllabi; student satisfaction survey data; and interviews with faculty, staff, and students who were involved in the program, were used to inform the results. The Summer Bridge program was successful in making students more confident when they enrolled in the fall. Students were more comfortable with the social setting as well as the academic setting. One limitation of the program was the lack of cultural diversity. Students were less inclined to practice their English speaking skills among fellow Chinese students. This study confirms that an extended orientation program for Chinese students improved their transition to American higher education.

Subjects/Keywords: Chinese international students; higher education; international student orientation; program evaluation; transition theory; university bridge programs; Chinese students; Chinese; Education (Higher); College student orientation; Foreign study; Chinese students; Social aspects; English language; Study and teaching; Foreign speakers; Cross-cultural counseling

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APA (6th Edition):

Dixon, B. A. (2014). Improving the social, linguistic, and academic success of Chinese international students. (Masters Thesis). Northeastern University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20018684

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dixon, Beth Anne. “Improving the social, linguistic, and academic success of Chinese international students.” 2014. Masters Thesis, Northeastern University. Accessed September 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20018684.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dixon, Beth Anne. “Improving the social, linguistic, and academic success of Chinese international students.” 2014. Web. 20 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Dixon BA. Improving the social, linguistic, and academic success of Chinese international students. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Northeastern University; 2014. [cited 2019 Sep 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20018684.

Council of Science Editors:

Dixon BA. Improving the social, linguistic, and academic success of Chinese international students. [Masters Thesis]. Northeastern University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20018684


University of Alberta

2. Szabo, Michelle E. Predeparture orientation for study abroad: perceived importance of components.

Degree: Master of Education in Adult and Higher Education, Department of Educational Policy Studies, 1996, University of Alberta

Subjects/Keywords: University of Alberta International Centre Education Abroad Program.; Cross-cultural orientation – Alberta.; Student exchange programs – Alberta.

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APA (6th Edition):

Szabo, M. E. (1996). Predeparture orientation for study abroad: perceived importance of components. (Masters Thesis). University of Alberta. Retrieved from https://era.library.ualberta.ca/files/4f16c468b

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Szabo, Michelle E. “Predeparture orientation for study abroad: perceived importance of components.” 1996. Masters Thesis, University of Alberta. Accessed September 20, 2019. https://era.library.ualberta.ca/files/4f16c468b.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Szabo, Michelle E. “Predeparture orientation for study abroad: perceived importance of components.” 1996. Web. 20 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Szabo ME. Predeparture orientation for study abroad: perceived importance of components. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Alberta; 1996. [cited 2019 Sep 20]. Available from: https://era.library.ualberta.ca/files/4f16c468b.

Council of Science Editors:

Szabo ME. Predeparture orientation for study abroad: perceived importance of components. [Masters Thesis]. University of Alberta; 1996. Available from: https://era.library.ualberta.ca/files/4f16c468b

3. Grabke, Sheldon Vaughn Richard. Institutional Strategies and Factors that Contribute to the Engagement of Recent Immigrant Adult Students in Ontario Post-Secondary Education.

Degree: PhD, Education, 2014, York University

The purpose of this study is to provide a unique investigation that yields vital data on barriers experienced by recent immigrant adult students (RIAS), the policies, practices and supports in PSE and their impact on RIAS engagement, and factors that contribute to the engagement of RIAS in Ontario PSE. This examination contributes to and furthers the student engagement in PSE literature by providing an original view into RIAS engagement in PSE. This dissertation involves qualitative and quantitative research methods including 18 key informant interviews, six focus groups, one interview and 434 survey responses as well as historical data, policies, procedures and artifacts at colleges and universities in Ontario. These different methodological attributes bring triangulation of sources and methods into the study. All of the data is analyzed using the student engagement conceptual framework. This study finds that PSE in Ontario seems to know little of the number, type, experiences and engagement of RIAS on campus. This research argues how and why the traditional model of engagement does not apply well to RIAS. Key findings include that RIAS are performing well academically in PSE despite the numerous barriers that they face and their lack of engagement. RIAS strong motivation to complete PSE and their inherent optimism is such that many persist to completion. One fundamental factor contributing to the lack of engagement for RIAS is their minimal social involvement in PSE. Using the findings, this dissertation provides numerous recommendations for changes to institutional policies and procedures to further RIAS engagement. Both academic and social engagement of RIAS in PSE significantly predict the hallmarks of a liberal education. This is a noteworthy reason for PSE to make an investment in the engagement of RIAS in Ontario PSE. This study therefore has implications for theory and practice in PSE in Ontario. Through developing creative ways to remove barriers and augment supports for RIAS in PSE, RIAS may begin to be more engaged in PSE. This noble endeavour can help RIAS more fully develop into engaged citizens and truly assist them in their settlement experience in Ontario. Advisors/Committee Members: Axelrod, Paul D. (advisor), Theory of participation (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Higher education; Education policy; Adult education; Traditional student; Immigrant; Immigrant education; Engagement; Student engagement; Recent immigrant; Adult student; Immigrant adult student; Immigrant student engagement; Recent immigrant adult student engagement; Ontario; Post-secondary education; Higher education; Ontario post-secondary education; PSE; Education policy; Ontario education policy; Ontario post-secondary education policy; English as a second language; liberal education; Barrier; Access; Persistence; Completion; Retention; Student retention; College; University; Ontario college; Ontario university; Qualitative research; Quantitative research; Engagement literature; Adult engagement literature; Student experience; Adult student experience; Immigrant student experience; Adult immigrant student experience; Recent immigrant adult student experience; Engagement model; Student engagement model; Immigrant student engagement model; Continuing education; Educational test; Educational measurement; Higher education administration; Education administration; Philosophy of education; Philosophy of liberal education; Public policy; Sociology of education; Education leadership; Education; Academic engagement; Social engagement; Citizen; Citizenship; Settlement; Immigrant settlement; Academic involvement; Social involvement; Labor market; Immigrant labor market; Immigrant labor market participation; International student; Student outcome; Post-secondary student outcome; Faculty; Faculty involvement; Student support service; Institutional departure; Diverse student; Non-traditional student; Non-traditional student engagement; Survey; Focus group; Learning; Student learning; Financial aid; Admission; Club; Student club; Orientation; Advanced standing; Age; Culture; Lack of time; Lack of money; Stress; Student stress; Canadian educational system; English support; Key informant

…272 Defining an International Student… …Student Services… …139 RIAS Outputs in PSE: Academic, Social and Student Service Involvement… …152 Student Residence, On-Campus Housing and On-Campus Jobs… …153 RIAS Outcomes in PSE: Student Learning, Retention, Student Experience and the Hallmarks… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Grabke, S. V. R. (2014). Institutional Strategies and Factors that Contribute to the Engagement of Recent Immigrant Adult Students in Ontario Post-Secondary Education. (Doctoral Dissertation). York University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10315/27554

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Grabke, Sheldon Vaughn Richard. “Institutional Strategies and Factors that Contribute to the Engagement of Recent Immigrant Adult Students in Ontario Post-Secondary Education.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, York University. Accessed September 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10315/27554.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Grabke, Sheldon Vaughn Richard. “Institutional Strategies and Factors that Contribute to the Engagement of Recent Immigrant Adult Students in Ontario Post-Secondary Education.” 2014. Web. 20 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Grabke SVR. Institutional Strategies and Factors that Contribute to the Engagement of Recent Immigrant Adult Students in Ontario Post-Secondary Education. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. York University; 2014. [cited 2019 Sep 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/27554.

Council of Science Editors:

Grabke SVR. Institutional Strategies and Factors that Contribute to the Engagement of Recent Immigrant Adult Students in Ontario Post-Secondary Education. [Doctoral Dissertation]. York University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/27554

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