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You searched for subject:(inner Melbourne). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Melbourne

1. Homewood, Penelope Jane. The Authorship of Space: The role of key individuals in the transformation of inner Melbourne from the late 1960’s to the mid-1980s and lessons learnt for today.

Degree: 2019, University of Melbourne

The purpose of this thesis is to provide new insights into how Melbourne was transformed between the late 1960s and the mid-1980s and understand how the lessons learnt from this work, along with a contemporary perspective on the urban condition, can assist the future planning and design of a more sustainable Melbourne. Archival research and interviews with politicians, academics and activists involved in Melbourne’s transformation over the research period under consideration, illustrate the important role urban design thinking and community-led activism had on driving the radical social, political and economic agenda that reshaped the city and led to inner Melbourne’s renowned liveability. Through outlining the cultural, socio-economic and political conditions over the study period, the thesis brings to light the planning theory and ideology of the time to provide a theoretical context for Melbourne’s evolution. When cities grow and change, it is not a linear or logical narrative but rather a dynamic story of overlays, interfaces and integration of place, people and politics. It is a story more complex than eclecticism, far removed from a set of procedures or rules. Melbourne’s transformation reflects the work of city planners who built on what was intrinsic to inner Melbourne, while being informed by highly active community activists, local residents, academics, students, politicians and professional bodies. The research outlines that urban change between the late 1960s and mid-1980s emerged with radical social change and there was a close interrelationship of ideology, geography, planning, culture and politics. A large consortium of people decided they were going to change the course of the city, and they did. Melbourne’s liveability is under threat of continuing decline as the city grows. There remains a tension between the rate of growth and the development models to accommodate this growth. The appropriate role and degree of government and community intervention in planning, and the role of the development market driving urban change, are in contention. Government is pushed by the development industry to make planning processes more efficient, faster and more streamlined. This pressure is compounded by the state government’s reliance on income generated from growth. While it is acknowledged that in this urban age, cities are increasingly important to drive economic development and create wealth, growth for growth’s sake will not sustain a great city. As championed by the city planners, politicians, academics and activists involved in Melbourne’s transformation over the research period, Melbourne’s growth must be in the best interests of all its citizens, driven by planning policies and strategies that enable those interests to be realised. The ‘radicals’ at the time of transformation sought a socially just society where urban planning was based on humanistic and ecological principles, informed by the daily experience of people who lived in the place. These ideals empowered a new breed of politicians at…

Subjects/Keywords: inner Melbourne; urban transformation; urbanism; urban renewal; urban activism; urban design; urban radicals; urban growth; urban history; Ruth and Maurie Crow; Gough Whitlam; John Cain; Evan Walker; David Yencken; planning of Melbourne; City of Melbourne; Ron Jones; Rob Adams; Lecki Ord; future Melbourne

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Homewood, P. J. (2019). The Authorship of Space: The role of key individuals in the transformation of inner Melbourne from the late 1960’s to the mid-1980s and lessons learnt for today. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Melbourne. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11343/235590

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Homewood, Penelope Jane. “The Authorship of Space: The role of key individuals in the transformation of inner Melbourne from the late 1960’s to the mid-1980s and lessons learnt for today.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Melbourne. Accessed October 20, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/11343/235590.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Homewood, Penelope Jane. “The Authorship of Space: The role of key individuals in the transformation of inner Melbourne from the late 1960’s to the mid-1980s and lessons learnt for today.” 2019. Web. 20 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Homewood PJ. The Authorship of Space: The role of key individuals in the transformation of inner Melbourne from the late 1960’s to the mid-1980s and lessons learnt for today. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Melbourne; 2019. [cited 2020 Oct 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11343/235590.

Council of Science Editors:

Homewood PJ. The Authorship of Space: The role of key individuals in the transformation of inner Melbourne from the late 1960’s to the mid-1980s and lessons learnt for today. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Melbourne; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11343/235590


Lincoln University

2. Davies, Frances Jane Jr. How elements of the inner city environment can be developed to promote liveability.

Degree: 2015, Lincoln University

New Zealand is one of the most highly urbanised countries in the world with well over 87 per cent of us living in 138 recognised urban centres, yet the number of people residing in inner city areas is proportionally very low. Householders have been exercising their preference for suburban or rural areas by opting for low density suburban environments. It is widely agreed that productivity and sustainability increase when people aggregate in the inner city, however there is a perceived trade-off between the density and liveability of an area. Achieving liveability in the inner city is concerned with reducing the pressures which emerge from higher population densities. Promoting inclusive societies, revitalising underutilised cityscapes, ensuring accessibility and fostering sense of place, are all elements essential to achieving liveable communities. The rebuild following the 2010 and 2011 Canterbury earthquakes provides Christchurch with an opportunity to shape a more environmentally sustainable, economically vibrant and liveable city. This research involves undertaking a case study of current inner city liveability measures and those provided for through the rebuild. A cross-case analysis with two of the world’s most liveable cities, Melbourne and Vancouver, exposes Christchurch’s potential shortcomings and reveals practical measures the city could implement in order to promote liveability.

Subjects/Keywords: liveability; urban planning; density; inner city revitalisation; community; development; Christchurch; Melbourne; Vancouver; 050205 Environmental Management; 120501 Community Planning

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Davies, F. J. J. (2015). How elements of the inner city environment can be developed to promote liveability. (Thesis). Lincoln University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10182/6681

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Davies, Frances Jane Jr. “How elements of the inner city environment can be developed to promote liveability.” 2015. Thesis, Lincoln University. Accessed October 20, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10182/6681.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Davies, Frances Jane Jr. “How elements of the inner city environment can be developed to promote liveability.” 2015. Web. 20 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Davies FJJ. How elements of the inner city environment can be developed to promote liveability. [Internet] [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 2015. [cited 2020 Oct 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/6681.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Davies FJJ. How elements of the inner city environment can be developed to promote liveability. [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/6681

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Melbourne

3. Elliott, Peter Vincent. Intra-metropolitan agglomerations of producer services firms: the case of graphic design firms in metropolitan Melbourne, 1981-2001.

Degree: 2005, University of Melbourne

Graphic Design is one part of the producer services sector of the modern metropolitan region. It is a sector that has experienced considerable development in terms of number of firms through demand created by the expansion of advertising and multi media. To date research has established that producer services, particularly finance related ones, agglomerate in the central city to take advantage of the agglomeration economies available in large metropolitan areas. This thesis argues that one of the key factors for the agglomeration of graphic design is the need for face-to-face communication with clients and other firms. There has been some work undertaken looking at the location of non-finance producer services, such as design, although these have been presented as snapshots at a point in time.This thesis extends this understanding through an analysis of agglomerations of graphic design firms over a twenty year time horizon. Using details of firm location in Melbourne every five years from 1981 to 2001 the thesis uses a geospatial analytical technique to identify agglomerations and explores the change in the size, location and density of agglomerations of firms. This research shows that the initial agglomeration of 1981 was still present by 2001 and had been joined by a number of new agglomerations ringing the Melbourne CBD while at the same time there has also been a dispersal of firms to the middle suburbs. In order to provide some insight in to the agglomeration of graphic design firms this research also examines the geography of two industries allied to graphic design: advertising and printing. This research shows that graphic designers and advertising agencies tend to locate in similar parts of inner Melbourne which may be due to the need for face-to-face contact between fims in these two industries. (For complete abstract open document)

Subjects/Keywords: agglomeration; Central Business District; crimestat; inner city; face-to-face communication; graphic design; hierarchical; clustering; producer services; business services; knowledge industry; spatial analysis; weightless product; metropolitan Melbourne

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Elliott, P. V. (2005). Intra-metropolitan agglomerations of producer services firms: the case of graphic design firms in metropolitan Melbourne, 1981-2001. (Masters Thesis). University of Melbourne. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11343/39025

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Elliott, Peter Vincent. “Intra-metropolitan agglomerations of producer services firms: the case of graphic design firms in metropolitan Melbourne, 1981-2001.” 2005. Masters Thesis, University of Melbourne. Accessed October 20, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/11343/39025.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Elliott, Peter Vincent. “Intra-metropolitan agglomerations of producer services firms: the case of graphic design firms in metropolitan Melbourne, 1981-2001.” 2005. Web. 20 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Elliott PV. Intra-metropolitan agglomerations of producer services firms: the case of graphic design firms in metropolitan Melbourne, 1981-2001. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Melbourne; 2005. [cited 2020 Oct 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11343/39025.

Council of Science Editors:

Elliott PV. Intra-metropolitan agglomerations of producer services firms: the case of graphic design firms in metropolitan Melbourne, 1981-2001. [Masters Thesis]. University of Melbourne; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11343/39025

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