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You searched for subject:(ignitions). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Southern California

1. Thomason, Andrew Charles. Modeling burn probability: a Maxent approach to estimating California's wildfire potential.

Degree: MS, Geographic Information Science and Technology, 2015, University of Southern California

Increased wildfire activity throughout California over the past decade demands greater research on wildfire management approaches. Understanding natural, as well as human landscape characteristics that explain spatial patterns of wildfire potential can be used to complement traditional wildfire management approaches, such as fire suppression, by identifying high risk areas. In this study, California’s wildfire potential was statistically modeled using wildfire observations from a 30‐year period (1984 to 2013) and a wide variety of environmental variables. Locations of burned wildland habitat encountered between 1984 and 2013 were related to ignition sources, climate conditions, topography, and vegetation to estimate the probability of wildfire for regions of California exclusive of past wildfire occurrences. Twenty‐nine variables were considered in building the wildfire probability model to determine which factors best indicate environmental susceptibility to wildfires. Two additional models, historic (1984–1988) and recent (2009–2013), were created to assess changes of wildfire probability across California over time. ❧ Results of the long‐term wildfire probability model display a heterogeneous distribution of wildfire probability across the state. Comparison between recent and historic wildfire probability values demonstrates fluctuations in wildfire potential near coastal and forested areas. Wildfire probability maps depicting the likelihood of wildfire in California can aid land as well as disaster management activities and can enhance the safety of firefighters and the public, and minimize wildland and property damages. Advisors/Committee Members: Ruddell, Darren M. (Committee Chair), Kemp, Karen K. (Committee Member), Longcore, Travis R. (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: wildfire; Maxent algorithm; spatial modeling; topography; climate; fuels; ignitions; species distribution modeling; probabilistic modeling

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APA (6th Edition):

Thomason, A. C. (2015). Modeling burn probability: a Maxent approach to estimating California's wildfire potential. (Masters Thesis). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/573852/rec/4124

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Thomason, Andrew Charles. “Modeling burn probability: a Maxent approach to estimating California's wildfire potential.” 2015. Masters Thesis, University of Southern California. Accessed November 18, 2019. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/573852/rec/4124.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Thomason, Andrew Charles. “Modeling burn probability: a Maxent approach to estimating California's wildfire potential.” 2015. Web. 18 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Thomason AC. Modeling burn probability: a Maxent approach to estimating California's wildfire potential. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Southern California; 2015. [cited 2019 Nov 18]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/573852/rec/4124.

Council of Science Editors:

Thomason AC. Modeling burn probability: a Maxent approach to estimating California's wildfire potential. [Masters Thesis]. University of Southern California; 2015. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/573852/rec/4124


University of Saskatchewan

2. Ezinwa, John Uzodinma. Modeling full-scale fire test behaviour of polyurethane foams using cone calorimeter data.

Degree: 2009, University of Saskatchewan

Flexible polyurethane foam (PUF) is a very versatile material ever created. The material is used for various applications and consumer end-use products such as upholstered furniture and mattresses. The increased use of these polymeric materials causes fire safety concerns. This has led to the development of various regulations and flammability test standards aimed at addressing the hazards associated with polyurethane foam fires. Several fire protection engineering correlations and thermal models have also been developed for the simulation of fire growth behaviour of polyurethane foams. Thus, the overall objective of this research project is to investigate the laboratory test behaviour of this material and then use finer modeling techniques to predict the heat release rate of the specimens, based on information obtained from cone calorimeter tests. Full-scale fire tests of 10 cm thick polyurethane foams of different sizes were conducted using center and edge-ignition locations. Flame spread and heat release rates were compared. For specimens of the same size, center-ignition tests produced flame areas and peak heat release rates which were respectively 10 and 20% larger compared to edge-ignition tests. Average flame spread rates for horizontal and vertical spread were determined, and results showed excellent agreement with literature. Cone calorimeter tests of the specimens were performed using steel edge frame and open durarock board. Results indicate that different test arrangements and heat sources have significant effects on the fire behaviour of the specimens. Predictions using the integral convolution model and other fire protection engineering correlations were compared with the full-scale tests results. Results show that the model was more efficient in predicting the heat release rates for edge-ignition tests than the center-ignition tests. The model also was more successful in predicting the heat release rates during the early part of the growth phase than during the later stages of the fire. The predicted and measured peak heat release rates and total heat release were within 10-15% of one another. Flame spread and t-squared fire models also gave satisfactory predictions of the full-scale fire behaviour of the specimens. Advisors/Committee Members: Torvi, David A., Pugsley, Todd, Bugg, James D., Bergstrom, Donald J..

Subjects/Keywords: convolution model; heat release rate prediction; cone calorimeter; flame spread rate; center and edge-ignitions; furniture calorimeter

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ezinwa, J. U. (2009). Modeling full-scale fire test behaviour of polyurethane foams using cone calorimeter data. (Thesis). University of Saskatchewan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-05302009-093227

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ezinwa, John Uzodinma. “Modeling full-scale fire test behaviour of polyurethane foams using cone calorimeter data.” 2009. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan. Accessed November 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-05302009-093227.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ezinwa, John Uzodinma. “Modeling full-scale fire test behaviour of polyurethane foams using cone calorimeter data.” 2009. Web. 18 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Ezinwa JU. Modeling full-scale fire test behaviour of polyurethane foams using cone calorimeter data. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2009. [cited 2019 Nov 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-05302009-093227.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Ezinwa JU. Modeling full-scale fire test behaviour of polyurethane foams using cone calorimeter data. [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-05302009-093227

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Sheehan, Timothy J. Modeling Wildfire and Ignitions for Climate Change and Alternative Land Management Scenarios in the Willamette Valley, Oregon.

Degree: 2011, University of Oregon

I developed software to incorporate the FlamMap fire model into an agent-based model, Envision, to enable the exploration of relationships between wildfire, land use, climate change, and vegetation dynamics in the Willamette Valley. A dynamic-link library plug-in utilizing row-ordered compressed array lookup tables converts parameters between polygon-based Envision data and grid-based FlamMap data. Modeled fires are determined through Monte-Carlo draws against a set of possible fires by linking historic fire data to future climate projections. I used classification and regression tree (CART) and logistic regression to relate ignitions to human and land use factors in the Willamette Valley above the valley floor from 2000-2009. Both methods showed decreasing distance to major and minor roads as key factors that increase ignition probability for human ignitions but not for lightning ignitions. The resulting statistical model is implemented in the FlamMap plug-in to provide a dynamic ignition probability map over time.

Subjects/Keywords: Ecology; Natural resources  – Management; Computer science; Health and environmental sciences; Applied science; Biological sciences; Ignitions; Lightning; Willamette Valley; Willamette River Valley (Or.)

IGNITIONS IN THE WILLAMETTE VALLEY, OREGON, USA… …62 Wildfire Ignitions Study… …50 6. All-ignitions classification and regression tree… …Fire suppression and human-caused ignitions can both lead to undesirable ecological changes… …fire model into the coupled systems model, and an analysis of the distribution of ignitions… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sheehan, T. J. (2011). Modeling Wildfire and Ignitions for Climate Change and Alternative Land Management Scenarios in the Willamette Valley, Oregon. (Thesis). University of Oregon. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1794/12184

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sheehan, Timothy J. “Modeling Wildfire and Ignitions for Climate Change and Alternative Land Management Scenarios in the Willamette Valley, Oregon.” 2011. Thesis, University of Oregon. Accessed November 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1794/12184.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sheehan, Timothy J. “Modeling Wildfire and Ignitions for Climate Change and Alternative Land Management Scenarios in the Willamette Valley, Oregon.” 2011. Web. 18 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Sheehan TJ. Modeling Wildfire and Ignitions for Climate Change and Alternative Land Management Scenarios in the Willamette Valley, Oregon. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Oregon; 2011. [cited 2019 Nov 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1794/12184.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Sheehan TJ. Modeling Wildfire and Ignitions for Climate Change and Alternative Land Management Scenarios in the Willamette Valley, Oregon. [Thesis]. University of Oregon; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1794/12184

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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