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You searched for subject:(hydro geochemical). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Missouri – Columbia

1. Wenz, Zachary John. Geochemistry and origins of Mississippi Valley type mineralizing fluids of the Ozark Plateau.

Degree: 2011, University of Missouri – Columbia

The compositions of fluid inclusions hosted in ore and gangue minerals from Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) Pb-Zn-Ba deposits of the Ozark Plateau region were measured to develop a regional hydro-geochemical conceptual model for ore emplacement. This model may explain the diverse compositions of fluids involved in mineral precipitation, the ore precipitation mechanism, and the temporal change in composition of fluids invading the ore districts. The conceptual model additionally provides evidence for what factors may have controlled deposit size, stratigraphic location, and Zn/Pb ratio. Available evidence indicates that sulfide mineral precipitation in the Ozark Plateau MVT districts most likely occurred primarily as a result of the introduction of sulfide into a Pb- and Zn-rich ore fluid. The lack of continuity in high Pb concentrations in fluid inclusions in sulfide and nonsulfide minerals from across the mineral parageneses suggests that the ore fluids either entered the districts intermittently or had variable metal contents over time. Reaction path and binary mixing models were developed to investigate possible evolutionary histories that could produce a fluid with a composition similar to the average composition of Ozark MVT ore fluids. The reaction path models considered reaction between evaporatively concentrated seawater and granite. These models demonstrated no modern or ancient evaporatively concentrated seawater reacting with granite can fully produce observed Ozark MVT fluid compositions. Binary mixing models considered mixing between evaporatively concentrated seawater and a halite dissolution brine. To produce the average composition of Ozark MVT ore fluids through mixing, the halite dissolution brine must have had a salinity close to that of Ozark MVT fluids, have been Na- dominant, and had low Cl/Br ratios. Advisors/Committee Members: Appold, Martin Stephan (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: fluid inclusions; hydro-geochemical conceptual model; Ozark Plateau; Mississippi Valley type deposits

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wenz, Z. J. (2011). Geochemistry and origins of Mississippi Valley type mineralizing fluids of the Ozark Plateau. (Thesis). University of Missouri – Columbia. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10355/14239

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wenz, Zachary John. “Geochemistry and origins of Mississippi Valley type mineralizing fluids of the Ozark Plateau.” 2011. Thesis, University of Missouri – Columbia. Accessed December 15, 2017. http://hdl.handle.net/10355/14239.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wenz, Zachary John. “Geochemistry and origins of Mississippi Valley type mineralizing fluids of the Ozark Plateau.” 2011. Web. 15 Dec 2017.

Vancouver:

Wenz ZJ. Geochemistry and origins of Mississippi Valley type mineralizing fluids of the Ozark Plateau. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Missouri – Columbia; 2011. [cited 2017 Dec 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/14239.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Wenz ZJ. Geochemistry and origins of Mississippi Valley type mineralizing fluids of the Ozark Plateau. [Thesis]. University of Missouri – Columbia; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/14239

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Colorado School of Mines

2. Atchley, Adam. Simulating geochemical reactive transport in physically and chemically heterogeneous aquifers: implications for CO2 risk assessment and uncertainty.

Degree: 2007, Colorado School of Mines

Simulating hydro-geochemical processes is crucial to understand a wide range of earth processes including carbon capture utilization and storage (CCUS), and risk assessment. However, simulating heterogeneous fully-coupled non-linear reactive transport at scales applicable to CCUS scenarios is computationally expensive. A streamline approach that simplifies a three-dimensional transport problem to a one dimensional transport problem in residence time is used to model non-linear kinetic geochemical reactions and transport over large domains. The efficiency achieved by the streamline approach allows for the simulation of ensembles of non-linear kinetic hydro-geochemical transport realizations on an 8-core Linux machine. CO2 leakage from a hypothetical CCUS operation into groundwater is used to showcase the streamline approach for simulating complex hydro-geochemical transport within an ensemble of 100 heterogeneous flow field realizations. The 2nd chapter of this dissertation uses the streamline approach to demonstrate that physical heterogeneity determines spreading and residence time, which then largely governs ensemble results. The distribution of solute residence times that resulted from physical heterogeneity, governs the amount of time advected solute has to undergo kinetically controlled geochemical reactions, which then determines the ensemble solute concentrations. The 3rd chapter illustrates the application of the streamline approach to estimating human health risk that considers both subsurface uncertainty and population variability. The contributions that hydrological and geochemical processes have on human health risk estimates are assessed. Chapter three shows that both hydrological and geochemical conditions plays a key role in determining concentrations of lead (Pb) and that simulating non-linear kinetics provides more protective risk estimates compared assuming chemical equilibrium. The 4th and final chapter investigates to the role of spatially heterogeneous reactive surface areas. An interesting dynamic between physical and geochemical heterogeneity is discussed. As a reactive solute approaches geochemical equilibrium the spatial distribution of reactivity can act to lower or higher effective ensemble reactions rates. Beyond the point that a reactive solute achieves geochemical equilibrium, physical heterogeneity is the sole factor controlling effective ensemble reactions rates. Advisors/Committee Members: Maxwell, Reed M. (advisor), Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K. (committee member), McCray, John E. (committee member), Benson, David A. (committee member), Skold, Magnus (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: transport; streamlines; numerical simulation; hydro-geochemical; Multiphase flow  – Computer simulation; Water chemistry; Hydrologic models; Carbon dioxide mitigation; Groundwater  – Simulation methods

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Atchley, A. (2007). Simulating geochemical reactive transport in physically and chemically heterogeneous aquifers: implications for CO2 risk assessment and uncertainty. (Thesis). Colorado School of Mines. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11124/79402

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Atchley, Adam. “Simulating geochemical reactive transport in physically and chemically heterogeneous aquifers: implications for CO2 risk assessment and uncertainty.” 2007. Thesis, Colorado School of Mines. Accessed December 15, 2017. http://hdl.handle.net/11124/79402.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Atchley, Adam. “Simulating geochemical reactive transport in physically and chemically heterogeneous aquifers: implications for CO2 risk assessment and uncertainty.” 2007. Web. 15 Dec 2017.

Vancouver:

Atchley A. Simulating geochemical reactive transport in physically and chemically heterogeneous aquifers: implications for CO2 risk assessment and uncertainty. [Internet] [Thesis]. Colorado School of Mines; 2007. [cited 2017 Dec 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11124/79402.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Atchley A. Simulating geochemical reactive transport in physically and chemically heterogeneous aquifers: implications for CO2 risk assessment and uncertainty. [Thesis]. Colorado School of Mines; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11124/79402

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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