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You searched for subject:(human wholeness). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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AUT University

1. Lambert, Althea Louise. Belonging and becoming: voices of harmonious being. Young women Steiner students explore their Lifeworlds through Goethean conversation .

Degree: 2012, AUT University

There are two central strands to this study, the voice of Steiner (or 'Waldorf') education and the voice of young women - voices rarely heard in the mainstream educational arena. Together they are the voice of 'harmonious being', a phrase which I have used to describe the phenomenon of the Steiner education experience which aims for harmonisation of the whole human being. Who the young person becomes is central to this experience yet there is little in-depth research exploring the Steiner student's voice. By addressing this gap and inviting young women Steiner students to explore this phenomenon through conversation this study achieves three significant visions. First, it raises the social voice of young women and challenges the negative stereotype of 'adolescent girl' proffered by the media. Second, it illuminates the living experience of an educational initiative that fosters connectedness and humankind's spiritual wisdom. Third, it demonstrates the value of simply talking and 'listening with spirit' to stay present in conversation and 'experience the other' through empowered and heart-centred relationships. As a consequence of doing this research, a fourth vision has emerged showing the value of love as methodology. Over one school year (9 months) I met regularly with twelve young women secondary students (14-18 years of age) from a New Zealand Steiner school to explore the phenomenon of harmonious being through conversations about their lives. Our conversations advance an intuitive methodology of love, connectedness and wholeness, which is encapsulated in a new methodological mix combining Goethean phenomenology with Carol Gilligan's relational psychology. Together they invoke the recognition of our innate connectedness. Goethe's is an artistic science of withness and wholeness ('one voice resonates with all voices') focusing on the epiphany experience of the archetypal phenomenon. Gilligan's voice-centred relational psychology has provided a humanistic feminist lens through which women and men come together as 'human' as heard in the layers of conversations with these young women. In this study, epiphany moments were unfolded in detail in six conversations series through a four stage process of Goethean layered listening. The themes of 'Belonging and Becoming' that emerged were explored through the collective voices of the twelve young women. The young women in this study offer insightful and rare views of their lifeworlds; voices rich with wisdom constructing 'adolescence' as a time of creative development. These young women show a remarkable interest in the world and a keen awareness of their social, cultural and physical environments locally, nationally and internationally. As evocative social agents they recreate the conventional 'moody adolescent' to a meaningful picture of what matters to a young woman as she authors her own life. What Gilligan calls 'the voice of resistance' is alive and well in these young women. Their experiences of 'harmonious being' transcribe a fluid lemniscate path of… Advisors/Committee Members: Clark, Beverley (advisor), Davies, Sharyn Graham (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Steiner education; Goethean conversation; Young women; Relational psychology; Adolescence; Voice; Harmonious being; Belonging; Love connectedness wholeness; Natural human science

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APA (6th Edition):

Lambert, A. L. (2012). Belonging and becoming: voices of harmonious being. Young women Steiner students explore their Lifeworlds through Goethean conversation . (Thesis). AUT University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10292/3558

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lambert, Althea Louise. “Belonging and becoming: voices of harmonious being. Young women Steiner students explore their Lifeworlds through Goethean conversation .” 2012. Thesis, AUT University. Accessed August 15, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10292/3558.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lambert, Althea Louise. “Belonging and becoming: voices of harmonious being. Young women Steiner students explore their Lifeworlds through Goethean conversation .” 2012. Web. 15 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Lambert AL. Belonging and becoming: voices of harmonious being. Young women Steiner students explore their Lifeworlds through Goethean conversation . [Internet] [Thesis]. AUT University; 2012. [cited 2020 Aug 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10292/3558.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Lambert AL. Belonging and becoming: voices of harmonious being. Young women Steiner students explore their Lifeworlds through Goethean conversation . [Thesis]. AUT University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10292/3558

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Louisville

2. Cowell, Mason. A symbol for transcendence : the human figure in the visual arts as a symbol of psychological wholeness as related to the archetype of divine androgyny and the reconciliation of the anima-animus.

Degree: MA, 1999, University of Louisville

From a Jungian perspective, this thesis investigates the ideal of androgynous transcendence by identifying the Jungian anima-animus archetype within three specific artworks produced by three differing traditions. As a result, this thesis contributes to the discipline of art history by providing a nontraditional approach to the interpretation of visual art. Although 'New Art History' is receptive to a Jungian approach in the analysis of visual art, this relatively recent and major new direction within art history does not readily embrace a Jungian understanding of the visual arts. A Jungian perspective towards the interpretation of visual art presents fascinating insights concerning Jung's understanding of the universal Transcendent Function in art. Jung's scholarship teaches that 'archetypes' are patterns of ideas within the 'collective unconsciousness' that are inherent in the psyche and thus common to all peoples and all cultures. Therefore, varying themes found within art are understood as originating from this universally common source of the collective unconscious. Cross-cultural symbols for transcendence, found in art, are often manifestations of universal archetypes such as the coalesced anima and animus. Although Jung was by no means the first to grasp the transcendental power of the idea of these amalgamated male-female opposites, he was the first to connect this idea with the study of psychology. Each of the following three artistic traditions that I have chosen for discussion and comparison offer an image which reflects this archetypally integrated anima-animus and the idea of divine androgyny. These principal world cultures, African, Eastern and Western, are each represented by one of these three artifacts. This thesis investigates the following artworks and their corresponding and confirming philosophies and mythologies: (I) The African tribal sculpture called Seated Couple reflects the archetypal ideal of the reconciliation of the anima-animus within an indigenous culture. (2) Representative of an Eastern culture, the Hindu erotic sculpture called Lovers also reflects this same ideal of the harmonized anima-animus. (3) William Blake's mixed-media illustration titled Satan Watching the Endearments of Adam and Eve represents a Western tradition, and is, like the other two artworks, representative of this same ideal of the unified anima and animus. This thesis identifies, reflected within the visual arts, the idea of the reconciliation of male-female opposites through the identification of the Jungian universal archetype of the coalesced anima-animus also often seen reflected under the guise of divine androgyny. Since art history has not readily applied a Jungian viewpoint towards the interpretation of the visual arts, it is my hope that this thesis will encourage more serious thought in this area among specialists as well as non-specialists. Advisors/Committee Members: Kloner, Jay Martin, 1938-.

Subjects/Keywords: Symbol; Transcendence; Human; Figure; Visual; Arts; Psychological; Wholeness; Related; Archetype; Divine; Androgyny; Reconciliation; Anima; Animus

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APA (6th Edition):

Cowell, M. (1999). A symbol for transcendence : the human figure in the visual arts as a symbol of psychological wholeness as related to the archetype of divine androgyny and the reconciliation of the anima-animus. (Masters Thesis). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/281 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/281

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cowell, Mason. “A symbol for transcendence : the human figure in the visual arts as a symbol of psychological wholeness as related to the archetype of divine androgyny and the reconciliation of the anima-animus.” 1999. Masters Thesis, University of Louisville. Accessed August 15, 2020. 10.18297/etd/281 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/281.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cowell, Mason. “A symbol for transcendence : the human figure in the visual arts as a symbol of psychological wholeness as related to the archetype of divine androgyny and the reconciliation of the anima-animus.” 1999. Web. 15 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Cowell M. A symbol for transcendence : the human figure in the visual arts as a symbol of psychological wholeness as related to the archetype of divine androgyny and the reconciliation of the anima-animus. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Louisville; 1999. [cited 2020 Aug 15]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/281 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/281.

Council of Science Editors:

Cowell M. A symbol for transcendence : the human figure in the visual arts as a symbol of psychological wholeness as related to the archetype of divine androgyny and the reconciliation of the anima-animus. [Masters Thesis]. University of Louisville; 1999. Available from: 10.18297/etd/281 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/281


University of Toronto

3. Neves, Ana Cristina Trindade. A Holistic Approach to the Ontario Curriculum: Moving to a More Coherent Curriculum.

Degree: 2009, University of Toronto

This study is an interpretive form of qualitative research that is founded in educational connoisseurship and criticism, which uses the author’s personal experiences as a holistic educator in a public school to connect theory and practice. Key research questions include: How do I, as a teacher, work with the Ontario curriculum to make it more holistic? What strategies have I developed in order to teach a more holistic curriculum? What kinds of difficulties interfere with my practice as I attempt to implement my holistic philosophy of education? This dissertation seeks to articulate a methodology for developing holistic curriculum that is in conformity with Ontario Ministry guidelines and is also responsive to the multifaceted needs of the whole student. The research findings will serve to inform teachers who wish to engage in holistic education in public schools and adopt a curriculum that is transformative while still being adaptable within mainstream education.

MAST

Advisors/Committee Members: Miller, John P., Cohen, Rina, Curriculum, Teaching and Learning.

Subjects/Keywords: holistic education; holistic learning; holistic teacher; holistic curriculum; curriculum development; Ontario curriculum; transformative curriculum; holistic philosophy of education; developing mindfulness; meditation in schools; visualization as a learning tool; yoga in schools; journal writing; Gulu walk; An Inconvenient Truth; Uganda Rising; anti-bullying education; human wholeness; Whole Child School; personal development; professional development; personal practical knowledge in teachers; educational connoisseurship and criticism; empowering students; Math trail; pedagogical approaches; autobiography; parents as partners in education; EQAO testing; student-led conferences; self awareness; balance in education; limited vision of Ontario curriculum; tensions between Holistic education and the Ontario curriculum; critical literacy ideology; ommission on the Whole Child; spirituality in education; anecdotal reporting to parents; social consciousness; Roots of Empathy; Who is Nobody; spiritual growth; ecological awareness; wholeness of human experience; creativity and intuition in education; 0727; 0524; 0280; 0998

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Neves, A. C. T. (2009). A Holistic Approach to the Ontario Curriculum: Moving to a More Coherent Curriculum. (Masters Thesis). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18107

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Neves, Ana Cristina Trindade. “A Holistic Approach to the Ontario Curriculum: Moving to a More Coherent Curriculum.” 2009. Masters Thesis, University of Toronto. Accessed August 15, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18107.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Neves, Ana Cristina Trindade. “A Holistic Approach to the Ontario Curriculum: Moving to a More Coherent Curriculum.” 2009. Web. 15 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Neves ACT. A Holistic Approach to the Ontario Curriculum: Moving to a More Coherent Curriculum. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Toronto; 2009. [cited 2020 Aug 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18107.

Council of Science Editors:

Neves ACT. A Holistic Approach to the Ontario Curriculum: Moving to a More Coherent Curriculum. [Masters Thesis]. University of Toronto; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18107

.