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You searched for subject:(health promoting behaviours). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Manitoba

1. Miller, Cindy. A balancing act: understanding the role of mother guilt and self-compassion in health-promoting behaviours in mothers with young children.

Degree: Kinesiology and Recreation Management, 2017, University of Manitoba

The maternal ethics of care dictates that being a ‘good mother’ entails mothers sacrificing their own needs to meet the needs of their family leaving some mothers feeling guilty about taking time to engage in health-promoting behaviours like physical activity, eating healthy and getting enough sleep. Self-compassion may play a role in how women negotiate guilty feelings when taking time or thinking about taking time, to engage in healthy behaviours. In this online, observational study, 143 mothers, with at least one child under five years, completed measures of health-prmoting behaviours as well as self-compassion and state guilt. Mediation analysis showed that mother guilt mediated the relationship between self-compassion and getting enough sleep and engagement in overall health-promoting behaviours but no mediating relationship was found between self-compassion and engagement in physical activity and healthy eating. Self-compassion therefore may offer mothers a positive way to deal with guilty feelings about looking after oneself. Advisors/Committee Members: Strachan, Shaelyn (Kinesiology and Recreation Management) (supervisor), Johnson, Amanda (Kinesiology and Recreation Management) Renaud, Robert (Educational Administration, Foundations & Psychology) (examiningcommittee).

Subjects/Keywords: self-compassion; mother guilt; health behaviours; health-promoting behaviours; ethics of care

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Miller, C. (2017). A balancing act: understanding the role of mother guilt and self-compassion in health-promoting behaviours in mothers with young children. (Masters Thesis). University of Manitoba. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1993/32443

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Miller, Cindy. “A balancing act: understanding the role of mother guilt and self-compassion in health-promoting behaviours in mothers with young children.” 2017. Masters Thesis, University of Manitoba. Accessed January 27, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1993/32443.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Miller, Cindy. “A balancing act: understanding the role of mother guilt and self-compassion in health-promoting behaviours in mothers with young children.” 2017. Web. 27 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Miller C. A balancing act: understanding the role of mother guilt and self-compassion in health-promoting behaviours in mothers with young children. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Manitoba; 2017. [cited 2020 Jan 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1993/32443.

Council of Science Editors:

Miller C. A balancing act: understanding the role of mother guilt and self-compassion in health-promoting behaviours in mothers with young children. [Masters Thesis]. University of Manitoba; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1993/32443


Queensland University of Technology

2. Smith, Sheree Margaret Stewart. A critical analysis of the relationship between health promoting behaviours, an individual's health risk, asthma severity and control, and patient centred asthma education in the emergency department.

Degree: 2006, Queensland University of Technology

Asthma affects over 2.2 million people in Australia. Asthma morbidity is increasing while mortality is decreasing. People with asthma experience shortness of breath as their airways narrow and become inflamed. After an episode of acute asthma many patients experience a relapse requiring further emergency department care. Numerous studies have been undertaken to identify the determinants of asthma morbidity and these studies have primarily used asthma oriented and co-morbidity scales such as anxiety and depression indices. Other studies in this area have indicated psychosocial factors such as coping, asthma attitudes and beliefs that may be linked to people with asthma who are non-compliant or adherent to treatment. Currently, there is no research available that has examined the link between general health promoting behaviours, an individual’s risk behaviour assessment and a brief asthma education encounter that is patient-centred. This study provides a description of the health promoting and risk taking behaviours of people who attend the emergency department with acute asthma. Secondly, it examines the effectiveness of patient-centred education compared with standard education. One hundred and forty-six people with acute asthma who attended the emergency departments of the Princess Alexandra and Mater Adult Public Hospitals were enrolled in this study. Participants self-reported health promoting and risk taking behaviours by completing the questionnaire that contained the Health Promoting Lifestyle Profile (HPLPII) and the Health Risk Appraisal (HRA) instruments. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) was also incorporated into the questionnaire to ascertain levels of anxiety and depression in this acute asthma group of people. The asthma education curriculum had the same topics for both the standard education and the patient-centred groups. However, the patient-centred group were able to prioritise the order of the topics according to their identified need. Secondly, the patient-centred group were asked two questions to ascertain the most important issue and asthma issue for them at that point in time. Both groups of participants were educated using the Asthma Foundation Leaflet “Asthma - Basic Facts” during the individual education session. There were 56% females and 44% males with a mean age (+SD) of 34 (13.8) years with 70.3% reported year 12 or above education and 49% of participants earned less that $20,000. Nearly half of the participants were admitted to a hospital ward following emergency department assessment and care. A large proportion of the participants had either moderate or severe asthma. The health behaviour findings from this study suggest people with acute asthma follow preventive health recommendations and safety guidelines more so than the wider community. However, they did not self-initiate home based health actions such as breast self-examination. At the time of attendance to the emergency department with acute asthma there were no statistical difference between the patient-centred…

Subjects/Keywords: asthma; emergency department; health promoting behaviours; risk-taking behaviours; asthma control; asthma severity; patient-centred education

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Smith, S. M. S. (2006). A critical analysis of the relationship between health promoting behaviours, an individual's health risk, asthma severity and control, and patient centred asthma education in the emergency department. (Thesis). Queensland University of Technology. Retrieved from http://eprints.qut.edu.au/16921/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Smith, Sheree Margaret Stewart. “A critical analysis of the relationship between health promoting behaviours, an individual's health risk, asthma severity and control, and patient centred asthma education in the emergency department.” 2006. Thesis, Queensland University of Technology. Accessed January 27, 2020. http://eprints.qut.edu.au/16921/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Smith, Sheree Margaret Stewart. “A critical analysis of the relationship between health promoting behaviours, an individual's health risk, asthma severity and control, and patient centred asthma education in the emergency department.” 2006. Web. 27 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Smith SMS. A critical analysis of the relationship between health promoting behaviours, an individual's health risk, asthma severity and control, and patient centred asthma education in the emergency department. [Internet] [Thesis]. Queensland University of Technology; 2006. [cited 2020 Jan 27]. Available from: http://eprints.qut.edu.au/16921/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Smith SMS. A critical analysis of the relationship between health promoting behaviours, an individual's health risk, asthma severity and control, and patient centred asthma education in the emergency department. [Thesis]. Queensland University of Technology; 2006. Available from: http://eprints.qut.edu.au/16921/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.