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You searched for subject:(groundwater containment). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Clemson University

1. Gebrai, Yoel. Modeling and Designing a Hydraulic Source Zone Isolation System.

Degree: MS, Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, 2018, Clemson University

Pump and Treat technology remains one of the most common approaches for groundwater remediation at contaminated sites. Despite its prevalence, the effectiveness of the Pump and Treat approach is limited by the chemical properties of the contaminant, heterogeneity, and cost (Mackay and Cherry, 1989; NRC, 1994). Pump and Treat systems are often in operation for long periods of time, at which point their environmental footprint, in addition to cost, needs to be considered. Greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generation to power pumps and the disruption of ecosystems over time are undesirable environmental effects that can be a cause of concern at sites that employ Pump and Treat (Ellis and Hadley, 2009; USEPA, 2009). A potentially more sustainable alternative to Pump and Treat remediation is source zone isolation. Source zone isolation can be achieved by surrounding a contaminant source with a material of contrasting permeability. The construction of an impermeable barrier, such as a sheet pile or slurry wall, is one technique that can be used to contain a contaminant source. However impermeable barriers must typically be excavated to a confining layer or bedrock and require nearly perfect construction to be effective. Impermeable barriers may also create a scenario where groundwater mounding takes place. A permeable hydraulic barrier, such as a French drain (Davis and Stansfield,1984) or constant head trench (Ankeny and Forbes, 1997), can provide a cheaper and more robust means for source zone isolation than an impermeable barrier. Clean, upstream groundwater would preferentially flow into, through, and exit the permeable barrier without contacting the source zone and contributing to an existing plume. This study utilizes groundwater flow and contaminant transport modeling to assess the influence of various permeable hydraulic barrier design parameters such as thickness, effective hydraulic conductivity, depth, and the inclusion of wells on source zone isolation. Additionally, different hydrogeologic scenarios for a prospective site are explored to see how they impact the performance of a permeable hydraulic barrier. Sensitivity analyses were performed on different design parameters in the presence of preexisting plumes generated from a continuous source in a homogeneous aquifer conceptual model and in a heterogeneous one as well. The simulation results for a homogeneous aquifer conceptual model suggests that permeable hydraulic barrier designs should fully penetrate an aquifer in order to achieve optimal results. Increases in the effective hydraulic conductivity and trench thickness are shown to increase hydraulic isolation. Simulation results of a sensitivity analysis performed on a heterogeneous aquifer conceptual model indicate that the presence of heterogeneity may enhance the performance of a hydraulic barrier. Designs such as a gravel trench, a gravel trench with pipe, and a gravel trench with pipe and source zone pumping were simulated for aquifer models of a prospective site where… Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Ronald Falta, Committee Chair, Dr. David Freedman, Dr. Lawrence Murdoch.

Subjects/Keywords: groundwater modeling; hydraulic barrier; hydraulic isolation; source zone containment

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gebrai, Y. (2018). Modeling and Designing a Hydraulic Source Zone Isolation System. (Masters Thesis). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2944

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gebrai, Yoel. “Modeling and Designing a Hydraulic Source Zone Isolation System.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Clemson University. Accessed February 16, 2020. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2944.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gebrai, Yoel. “Modeling and Designing a Hydraulic Source Zone Isolation System.” 2018. Web. 16 Feb 2020.

Vancouver:

Gebrai Y. Modeling and Designing a Hydraulic Source Zone Isolation System. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Clemson University; 2018. [cited 2020 Feb 16]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2944.

Council of Science Editors:

Gebrai Y. Modeling and Designing a Hydraulic Source Zone Isolation System. [Masters Thesis]. Clemson University; 2018. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2944


University of Saskatchewan

2. Bergerman, Martin. Design of free flowing granular drains for groundwater containment applications.

Degree: 2011, University of Saskatchewan

Many geoenvironmental applications make use of granular drainage layers. Design guidelines for these drains recommend a granular soil that provides for filtration of the adjacent base soil. Filtration criteria have been developed through laboratory studies in which fine soils under a concentrated gradient of water are protected from erosion by a filter soil. The primary objective in these studies has been the geotechnical stability of earth-fill structures, while drainage was a secondary consideration. Granular drainage layers have therefore been constructed using fine sand. The subsequent migration of fine soil into these drains has resulted in significant loss in permeability. The main research objective was to develop design criteria for granular drains to be used for long term operation in environmental applications. The secondary objective was to investigate the relationships between grain size distribution of drain materials and clogging by fines. This was done through a laboratory study where changes in permeability were measured in granular soils infiltrated with fines. Lastly, the effect of salinity on fines deposition was also investigated. The hypothesis of the current study is that coarser granular drains minimize the impact of clogging and provides a better alternative to traditional drain designs for long term environmental applications. The laboratory study was performed with three granular drainage soils: a French Drain sand designed using the traditional filter design method, a coarser uniform sand, and a coarser graded sand with approximately 40% gravel sized particles. Three fine soils were used to infiltrate the drainage soils; however, their particle size distributions were not significantly different from one another. The results indicate that the permeability of all three drainage soils could be reduced by approximately one order of magnitude with continuous flow of a high concentration of fines (5 g/L). The permeabilities of the sands were reduced to a lesser extent with a lower concentration of fines. Permeabilities of the graded soils decreased more slowly with a lower concentration of fines, when considering pore volumes of flow. However, the rate of permeability decrease was ultimately influenced by the amount of fines delivered to the sample. A lower concentration of fines did not significantly slow the rate of permeability reduction in the uniform sand. All three sands retained a similar mass of fines (samples were split and fines content measured following each test). Salinity in the pore water did not significantly affect deposition, likely due to the fact that the fines contained a small amount of clay sized particles. When considering that all three drainage soils became clogged with fines during the tests, the coarse soils maintained a relatively high permeability due to the fact that their pre-test permeabilities were high. This information, along with the results from the literature review, has led to the development of recommended new design criteria for… Advisors/Committee Members: Haug, Moir D., Boulfiza, Mohamed, Sharma, Jitendrapal S., Barbour, S. L., Fonstad, Terrance A..

Subjects/Keywords: fines deposition; filter permeability; groundwater containment; granular drain; soil drain; granular filter; soil filter; base soil

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bergerman, M. (2011). Design of free flowing granular drains for groundwater containment applications. (Thesis). University of Saskatchewan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-01102011-192840

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bergerman, Martin. “Design of free flowing granular drains for groundwater containment applications.” 2011. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan. Accessed February 16, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-01102011-192840.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bergerman, Martin. “Design of free flowing granular drains for groundwater containment applications.” 2011. Web. 16 Feb 2020.

Vancouver:

Bergerman M. Design of free flowing granular drains for groundwater containment applications. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2011. [cited 2020 Feb 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-01102011-192840.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Bergerman M. Design of free flowing granular drains for groundwater containment applications. [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-01102011-192840

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.