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You searched for subject:(giant otter). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Georgia Tech

1. Perdue, Bonnie Marie. Sex differences in spatial memory ability: a test of the range size hypothesis in the order carnivora.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2011, Georgia Tech

Sex differences in spatial cognition have been reported for many species ranging from voles to humans. The range size hypothesis predicts that sex differences in spatial ability will only occur in species in which the mating system selects for differential range size. Consistent with this prediction, we observed sex differences in spatial ability in giant pandas, a promiscuous species in which males inhabit larger ranges than females, but did not observe sex differences in Asian small-clawed otters, a related monogamous species in which males and females share home ranges. Furthermore, the sex difference in giant pandas was observed during the period of male range expansion and outside female estrus, thus the potentially confounding influence of decreased female ability was avoided. Finally, all subjects in this study were raised in captivity and never actually inhabited different range sizes. Therefore these findings emphasize the importance of biological rather than experiential factors underlying sex differences in spatial cognition. These results are the first evidence of sex differences in spatial ability in the order Carnivora, and provide support for the range size hypothesis. Advisors/Committee Members: Terry Maple (Committee Chair), Anderson Smith (Committee Member), M. Jackson Marr (Committee Member), Paul Corballis (Committee Member), Rebecca Snyder (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Otter; Giant panda; Range size hypothesis; Evolutionary theory; Spatial memory; Sex differences; Cognitive psychology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Perdue, B. M. (2011). Sex differences in spatial memory ability: a test of the range size hypothesis in the order carnivora. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/39519

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Perdue, Bonnie Marie. “Sex differences in spatial memory ability: a test of the range size hypothesis in the order carnivora.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed September 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/39519.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Perdue, Bonnie Marie. “Sex differences in spatial memory ability: a test of the range size hypothesis in the order carnivora.” 2011. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Perdue BM. Sex differences in spatial memory ability: a test of the range size hypothesis in the order carnivora. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2011. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/39519.

Council of Science Editors:

Perdue BM. Sex differences in spatial memory ability: a test of the range size hypothesis in the order carnivora. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/39519


University of Stirling

2. Recharte, Maribel. Human-otter interactions in the Peruvian Amazon: perceptions and potential for conservation.

Degree: PhD, Biological and Environmental Sciences, 2018, University of Stirling

Human expansion is damaging pristine habitats and causing losses to biodiversity; meanwhile some wildlife species are perceived negatively when they cause damage or loss to humans. My main objective was to obtain a better understanding of the interactions between people and giant otters, a top aquatic predator in Amazonia and an international flagship species for tourism. In Chapter 2, I explore perceptions and attitudes towards wildlife using structured interviews and focus groups to find out how the perceptions of giant otters as damagers of fishing nets compared with that caused by other aquatic species. People from three Peruvian Amazon communities, Pacaya-Samiria National Reserve (PSNR), Pucacuro National Reserve (PNR) and Maijuna-Kichwa Regional Conservation Area (MKRCA) all had different perceptions of otters; in PSNR people were more tolerant to the presence of giant otters. In PNR and MKRCA interviewees had highly negative perceptions of giant otters, even though fishing registers demonstrated that giant otters have few interactions with fishermen during fishing and rarely damage nets in comparison to other aquatic predators. Moreover, fish such as piranha, suckermouth catfish, and wolf fish, among others, broke nets at the same frequency as did aquatic predators. Short and long-term outcomes of ‘single-hit’ conservation education was evaluated for schoolchildren in two communities in Chapter 3. There was no difference between the attitudes of schoolchildren who participated in single-hit session in 2009 and those who did not, however, overall, all participants had significantly more positive attitudes to giant otters after a single hit session in 2014. In Chapter 4, I investigate the relative appeal of giant otters for tourists compared to other species, using questionnaires with tourists in the Peruvian Amazon, to determine their suitability as a flagship species for tourism - a role they are widely assumed to fulfil. While giant otters did not emerge in the top five as important flagship species during the interviews, they do fulfil all the criteria for making an excellent flagship species and remain an attractive candidate for conservation marketing. Building local awareness and a positive relationship between local people and aquatic predators is necessary to ensure their survival. Giant otters are now almost universally present in Amazonia and are potentially easy to focus tourism around – they represent the perfect flagship to promote conservation campaigns and to slow the destruction and degradation of waterways in the Amazon – currently a pressing issue in the region.

Subjects/Keywords: Human-otter interactions; Human-otter perceptions; Peruvian Amazon; Human-wildlife coexistence; giant otter; ecotourism; flagship species; Amazonia; tourist's perceptions; Wildlife conservation; conservation management; environmental education; schoolchildren; Peru; aquatic predators; protected areas; Wildlife conservation; Otter; Peru; Amazonia; Ecotourism; Predatory aquatic animals

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Recharte, M. (2018). Human-otter interactions in the Peruvian Amazon: perceptions and potential for conservation. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Stirling. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1893/28951

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Recharte, Maribel. “Human-otter interactions in the Peruvian Amazon: perceptions and potential for conservation.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Stirling. Accessed September 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1893/28951.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Recharte, Maribel. “Human-otter interactions in the Peruvian Amazon: perceptions and potential for conservation.” 2018. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Recharte M. Human-otter interactions in the Peruvian Amazon: perceptions and potential for conservation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Stirling; 2018. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/28951.

Council of Science Editors:

Recharte M. Human-otter interactions in the Peruvian Amazon: perceptions and potential for conservation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Stirling; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/28951

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