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You searched for subject:(generational issues). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of North Texas

1. Mayeda, Karen A. Generational and Transgenerational Issues of the Japanese American Internment : A Phenomenological Study.

Degree: 1995, University of North Texas

This study utilized a qualitative/phenomenological research methodology to examine the generational and transgenerational issues of five identified Japanese American families. To be included in this study, families were identified to contain at least one member who was interned during World War II or who had parents, grandparents, or great-grandparents who were interned. Semistructured interviews, including Adlerian lifestyle assessments, were conducted with the 28 research informants who represented the second, third, and fourth generations of their families. Advisors/Committee Members: Wilborn, Bobbie L., Williams, Joyce E., Landreth, Garry L., Williams, Norma.

Subjects/Keywords: Japanese American internment; generational issues; transgenerational issues; Japanese Americans  – Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945.; Japanese Americans  – Psychology.; Intergenerational relations.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mayeda, K. A. (1995). Generational and Transgenerational Issues of the Japanese American Internment : A Phenomenological Study. (Thesis). University of North Texas. Retrieved from https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc278845/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mayeda, Karen A. “Generational and Transgenerational Issues of the Japanese American Internment : A Phenomenological Study.” 1995. Thesis, University of North Texas. Accessed February 27, 2021. https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc278845/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mayeda, Karen A. “Generational and Transgenerational Issues of the Japanese American Internment : A Phenomenological Study.” 1995. Web. 27 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Mayeda KA. Generational and Transgenerational Issues of the Japanese American Internment : A Phenomenological Study. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 1995. [cited 2021 Feb 27]. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc278845/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Mayeda KA. Generational and Transgenerational Issues of the Japanese American Internment : A Phenomenological Study. [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 1995. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc278845/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Queensland University of Technology

2. Connell, Shirley Elizabeth. Young Australian women with breast cancer : perspectives of their illness experiences.

Degree: 2005, Queensland University of Technology

Young women with breast cancer have been found to experience their disease more negatively and more intensely than their older counterparts. However 'young' is not uniformly defined within the literature. Studies have reported on a wide range of ages considered to be 'young', such as samples simply divided by menopausal status or other researcher-defined parameters. For the purpose of this study, young women with breast cancer were defined as those diagnosed at 40 years of age or younger. The overarching aim of the study was to explore the problems faced by this group of young women using qualitative methodology, guided by constructionist epistemology, and grounded in symbolic interactionism and social constructionism. The study was conducted longitudinally, with data collected three times over a 12-18 month period using one-to-one in-depth semi-structured interviews. Baseline data were collected in the first phase of the study (n=35). A sub-group of participants (n=13) were chosen to be followed twice more approximately six months apart, which made up the next two phases. Themes derived from the literature guided the first phase of the study, data collection and analysis. Data analysis was performed after each data collection phase, with findings informing the next phase/s of the study. Thematic and content analysis were utilized in regards to the analysis of the first phase of the study, providing a framework identifying the most pressing concerns, such as those centred around children and partners, emotional aspects and negative physical consequences of treatment. Interrelationships between these themes were apparent. Findings suggest that the emotional support needs of this group of young women remains a challenge. Basic analytical principles of data reduction, data display and drawing conclusions guided the following phases of the analysis. NUD*IST (N6) software was utilized to help undertake in-depth analysis of all follow-up data. The literature concentrates on infertility as a concern for young women with breast cancer, however the study found that fertility per se was a concern for this group of women. Issues of maintained and regained fertility were reported, i.e., concerns surrounding suitable, safe and reliable contraception, pregnancy and breastfeeding after breast cancer. Over time, perceptions of fertility changed. Decisions related to unplanned pregnancies and breastfeeding were particularly onerous. The study also provided other insights into the participants' lives. Body image is suggested to be of greater concern for younger women with breast cancer than their older counterparts. Perceptions of breast symbolism, societal and personal, were explored, as were perceptions of the external portrayal of their bodies. In addition, the participants reported how their experience of breast cancer differed from that of older women with breast cancer, e.g., to be and dress more sexually. Theories and notions of social constructionism and the social construction of the body helped explain the participants'…

Subjects/Keywords: Breast cancer; Young women; Children; Partners; Support; Reproduction issues; Fertility/infertility after breast cancer; Contraception after breast cancer; Pregnancy after breast cancer; Breastfeeding after breast cancer; Breast symbolism; Generational differences; Body image; Social norms; Social expectations; Cultural trends; Qualitative; Longitudinal

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Connell, S. E. (2005). Young Australian women with breast cancer : perspectives of their illness experiences. (Thesis). Queensland University of Technology. Retrieved from https://eprints.qut.edu.au/16054/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Connell, Shirley Elizabeth. “Young Australian women with breast cancer : perspectives of their illness experiences.” 2005. Thesis, Queensland University of Technology. Accessed February 27, 2021. https://eprints.qut.edu.au/16054/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Connell, Shirley Elizabeth. “Young Australian women with breast cancer : perspectives of their illness experiences.” 2005. Web. 27 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Connell SE. Young Australian women with breast cancer : perspectives of their illness experiences. [Internet] [Thesis]. Queensland University of Technology; 2005. [cited 2021 Feb 27]. Available from: https://eprints.qut.edu.au/16054/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Connell SE. Young Australian women with breast cancer : perspectives of their illness experiences. [Thesis]. Queensland University of Technology; 2005. Available from: https://eprints.qut.edu.au/16054/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Southern California

3. Turner, Michèle Gillenwater. Institutional diversity policy improvement through the lens of Black alumni stakeholder leadership: a gap analysis.

Degree: EdD, Global Executive, 2014, University of Southern California

Resoundingly, the common spirals downward of Black enrollment and completion trends at highly selective institutions are symptoms of obsolete philosophies regarding diversity that have disadvantaged multicultural policy aspirations by and large. Seeking concrete solutions to reverse this momentum, findings and results from this mixed methods inquiry robustly indicate that the cultural lens of Black alumni leaders be considered to best attune diversity policy decision-making. Deliberate inputs specifically from the stakeholder of issue, based upon actual life experiences, cultural knowledge and vested institutional relationships, should be critically integrated throughout the policy making process to strengthen contemporary frameworks. Results confirm that Black alumni in predominately white institutional contexts are highly motivated to seek, lead and collaboratively develop efforts that would correlate to positive outcomes for all students, yet particularly increase access, parity and completion rates of middle-income Black students (that compose the preponderance of underrepresented Black students currently and in the future) whose needs are presently overlooked. This study suggests a “Diversity Policy Leadership Plan (DPLP)” as a solution plan framework for Black alumni leaders to effectively inform improvements through expanded knowledge of cultural perspectives, and closer alignment of organizational cultural settings that are credible, accountable and consequently mitigate Black alumni concerns regarding desired generational progress. By believing their legacies would no longer be threatened within racially conservative systems, Black alumni leaders could instead become empowered protagonists and global exemplars for institutional multicultural diversity policy transformation. Advisors/Committee Members: Robison, Mark Power (Committee Chair), Diamond, Michael A. (Committee Member), Picus, Lawrence O. (Committee Member), Yates, Kenneth A. (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: diversity policy; higher education; predominately White institutions; cultural diversity; ethnic diversity; race; equity; access; inclusion; affirmative action; critical race theory; race realists; cultural stakeholders; institutional leadership; alumni leadership; diversity policy leadership; African American alumni leadership; Black alumni leadership; multicultural diversity policy; African American completion rates in higher education; Black enrollment trends in higher education; African American diversity; global diversity issues; global multicultural diversity; private university environments; highly selective institutions; middle income African Americans; middle income Black students; diversity policy plan frameworks; diversity policy improvement; cultural perspectives; organizational cultural settings; organizational cultural models; African American generational progress; diversity policy transformation; African American cultural models; African American cultural perspectives

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Turner, M. G. (2014). Institutional diversity policy improvement through the lens of Black alumni stakeholder leadership: a gap analysis. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/477674/rec/3521

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Turner, Michèle Gillenwater. “Institutional diversity policy improvement through the lens of Black alumni stakeholder leadership: a gap analysis.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed February 27, 2021. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/477674/rec/3521.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Turner, Michèle Gillenwater. “Institutional diversity policy improvement through the lens of Black alumni stakeholder leadership: a gap analysis.” 2014. Web. 27 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Turner MG. Institutional diversity policy improvement through the lens of Black alumni stakeholder leadership: a gap analysis. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2014. [cited 2021 Feb 27]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/477674/rec/3521.

Council of Science Editors:

Turner MG. Institutional diversity policy improvement through the lens of Black alumni stakeholder leadership: a gap analysis. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2014. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/477674/rec/3521

.