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You searched for subject:(gait intent recognition). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Vanderbilt University

1. Sup IV, Frank Charles. A Powered Self-Contained Knee and Ankle Prosthesis for Near Normal Gait in Transfemoral Amputees.

Degree: PhD, Mechanical Engineering, 2009, Vanderbilt University

The human leg serves as the primary mechanism to provide locomotion and general mobility, both of which require significant power generation at the joints. Today, commercial lower limb prostheses are generally passive devices capable of only dissipating or storing energy. Amputees must adapt their gait and mobility patterns to compensate for this lack of power. The hypothesis of this work postulates that restoring power to the knee and ankle joints can positively affect gait and increase the ease of mobility in above knee amputees. Described herein is the development of an electrically powered knee and ankle prosthesis intended to restore normal locomotive function to above knee amputees. Initial work focused on a tethered prototype with off-board power and computation to investigate electrical power requirements of such a device. Findings indicated that a device could be fabricated with an acceptable operating weight and range, though limited. Based on this work, a self-contained electrically powered knee and ankle prosthesis was developed. The design specifications, mechanical and electrical designs, control architecture for the self-contained version are described. Experimental results testing the device on an above knee amputee demonstrate the devices merit in restoring biomechanically normal gait patterns, assistive sit to stand transitions and powered slope ascent. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Nilanjan Sarkar (committee member), Dr. George E. Cook (committee member), Dr. Robert J. Webster III (committee member), Dr. Eric J. Barth (committee member), Dr. Michael Goldfarb (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Intent Recognition; Impedance Control; Amputee Gait; Powered Prosthesis

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sup IV, F. C. (2009). A Powered Self-Contained Knee and Ankle Prosthesis for Near Normal Gait in Transfemoral Amputees. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1803/13427

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sup IV, Frank Charles. “A Powered Self-Contained Knee and Ankle Prosthesis for Near Normal Gait in Transfemoral Amputees.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed January 23, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1803/13427.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sup IV, Frank Charles. “A Powered Self-Contained Knee and Ankle Prosthesis for Near Normal Gait in Transfemoral Amputees.” 2009. Web. 23 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Sup IV FC. A Powered Self-Contained Knee and Ankle Prosthesis for Near Normal Gait in Transfemoral Amputees. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2009. [cited 2021 Jan 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/13427.

Council of Science Editors:

Sup IV FC. A Powered Self-Contained Knee and Ankle Prosthesis for Near Normal Gait in Transfemoral Amputees. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/13427


Vanderbilt University

2. Varol, Huseyin Atakan. Progress towards the intelligent control of a powered transfemoral prosthesis.

Degree: MS, Electrical Engineering, 2007, Vanderbilt University

In this thesis, firstly a real-time gait intent recognition approach for use in controlling a fully powered transfemoral prosthesis is described. Rather than utilize an “echo control” as proposed by others, which requires instrumentation of the sound-side leg, the proposed approach infers user intent based on the characteristic shape of the force and moment vector of interaction between the user and prosthesis. The real-time intent recognition approach utilizes a K-nearest neighbor algorithm with majority voting and threshold biasing schemes to increase its robustness. The ability of the approach to recognize in real time a person’s intent to stand or walk at one of three different speeds is demonstrated on measured biomechanics data. Secondly, an active passive torque decomposition procedure for use in controlling a fully powered transfemoral prosthesis is described. The active and passive parts of the joint torques are extracted by solving a constrained least squares optimization problem. The proposed approach generates the torque reference of joints by combining the active part, which is a function of the force and moment vector of the interaction between user and prosthesis and the passive part, which has a nonlinear spring-dashpot behavior. The ability of the approach to reconstruct the required joint torques is again demonstrated in simulation on measured biomechanics data. Finally, the calibration procedure of the three axis socket load cell of the prosthesis' mechanical sensory interface is also presented in the thesis. Advisors/Committee Members: George E. Cook (committee member), Michael Goldfarb (Committee Chair), D. Mitch Wilkes (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: decomposition based control; powered transfemoral prosthesis; gait intent recognition; nearest neighbor algorithms; Artificial legs  – Design and construction; Intelligent control systems

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Varol, H. A. (2007). Progress towards the intelligent control of a powered transfemoral prosthesis. (Thesis). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1803/13605

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Varol, Huseyin Atakan. “Progress towards the intelligent control of a powered transfemoral prosthesis.” 2007. Thesis, Vanderbilt University. Accessed January 23, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1803/13605.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Varol, Huseyin Atakan. “Progress towards the intelligent control of a powered transfemoral prosthesis.” 2007. Web. 23 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Varol HA. Progress towards the intelligent control of a powered transfemoral prosthesis. [Internet] [Thesis]. Vanderbilt University; 2007. [cited 2021 Jan 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/13605.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Varol HA. Progress towards the intelligent control of a powered transfemoral prosthesis. [Thesis]. Vanderbilt University; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/13605

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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