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You searched for subject:(fork regression). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Southern California

1. Ding, Lin. Essential and non-essential helicases maintain genome stability in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

Degree: PhD, Molecular Biology, 2014, University of Southern California

A healthy cell needs to accurately duplicate its genome and pass one copy to each of its daughter cells. The DNA double helix is accessed by replication machinery once per cell cycle during S phase and regulated unwinding of this molecule is essential for replication. However, unwinding can make the DNA vulnerable to damage or breakage. Therefore, the process of unwinding must be carefully regulated. ❧ The conserved proteins Mcm2-7 form the MCM complex, which is the replicative helicase responsible for unwinding the DNA duplex during replication. The MCM complex also plays an important role in replication fork establishment. During S phase, replication fork stability is challenged by many natural impediments or environmental stresses, and control of the unwinding is essential to prevent fork collapse and DNA damage. The focus of my thesis is to gain deeper understanding of how helicase activities are regulated to preserve replication fork integrity. ❧ In chapter 2, I investigate a new factor that regulates the essential replicative helicase, MCM complex. Mcb1 is the ortholog of human MCM binding protein in S. pombe, and I found that Mcb1 antagonizes MCM helicase function by disrupting the association of Mcm2 with other MCM proteins. ❧ In chapter 3, I examined another conserved but non-essential helicase, Rad8. I investigated whether Rad8’s fork regression helicase domain is involved in replication fork restart during HU treatment. Using a genetic approach, I demonstrated that the ubiquitin ligase domain instead of helicase domain is required for Rad8 to promote fork recovery. Advisors/Committee Members: Forsburg, Susan L. (Committee Chair), Aparicio, Oscar M. (Committee Member), Finkel, Steven E. (Committee Member), Thompson, Mark E. (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: replication fork; helicases; MCM; S. pombe; ubiquitin ligase; fork regression; fork recovery; homologous recombination

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APA (6th Edition):

Ding, L. (2014). Essential and non-essential helicases maintain genome stability in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/360582/rec/2492

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ding, Lin. “Essential and non-essential helicases maintain genome stability in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed January 22, 2020. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/360582/rec/2492.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ding, Lin. “Essential and non-essential helicases maintain genome stability in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.” 2014. Web. 22 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Ding L. Essential and non-essential helicases maintain genome stability in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2014. [cited 2020 Jan 22]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/360582/rec/2492.

Council of Science Editors:

Ding L. Essential and non-essential helicases maintain genome stability in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2014. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/360582/rec/2492


Montana Tech

2. D'Angelo, Vincent Stephen. Factors Influencing the Distribution of Bull Trout and Westslope Cutthroat Trout West of the Continental Divide in Glacier National Park.

Degree: MS, 2010, Montana Tech

The reported decline of native bull trout Salvelinus confluentus and westslope cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi populations west of the Continental Divide in Glacier National Park (GNP) prompted research to identify critical habitats and investigate factors influencing their distribution and relative abundance. I evaluated the association of six abiotic factors (stream width, elevation, gradient, large woody debris density, pool density, mean August stream temperature) and a biotic factor (the presence of nonnative lake trout, Salvelinus namaycush) with the occurrence and density of bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout in 79 stream reaches in five sub-drainages of the North Fork Flathead River in GNP. Logistic and linear regression models were used to quantify the influence of these independent variables on species occurrence (presence/absence) and density (age-1 or older fish/100m2), and an information theoretic approach (AICc) was used to determine the most plausible combinations of variables in each case. The occurrence of westslope cutthroat trout was negatively associated with the presence of lake trout and positively associated with large woody debris and water temperature. Westslope cutthroat were detected throughout a wide range of water temperatures (8.5-16 °C), stream sizes and elevations, but were most abundant in small, complex streams that were not connected to lakes supporting lake trout. Bull trout occurrence was positively related to stream width and negatively related to channel gradient and water temperature. Bull trout were most abundant in narrow (< 10 m wetted width) streams with relatively cold mean August water temperatures (8-10 °C) and in stream reaches not affected by lake trout. The low densities and limited distribution of bull trout observed in this study reflect the imperiled status of adfluvial populations in GNP, owing to the invasion and establishment of nonnative lake trout from Flathead Lake. These data may be used to monitor critical habitats and populations, inform conservation and recovery programs, and guide suppression efforts to reduce the deleterious impacts of nonnative invasive fishes.

Subjects/Keywords: bull trout; Glacier National Park; multiple regression; nonnative species; North Fork of the Flathead River; westslope cutthroat trout

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APA (6th Edition):

D'Angelo, V. S. (2010). Factors Influencing the Distribution of Bull Trout and Westslope Cutthroat Trout West of the Continental Divide in Glacier National Park. (Masters Thesis). Montana Tech. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/426

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

D'Angelo, Vincent Stephen. “Factors Influencing the Distribution of Bull Trout and Westslope Cutthroat Trout West of the Continental Divide in Glacier National Park.” 2010. Masters Thesis, Montana Tech. Accessed January 22, 2020. https://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/426.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

D'Angelo, Vincent Stephen. “Factors Influencing the Distribution of Bull Trout and Westslope Cutthroat Trout West of the Continental Divide in Glacier National Park.” 2010. Web. 22 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

D'Angelo VS. Factors Influencing the Distribution of Bull Trout and Westslope Cutthroat Trout West of the Continental Divide in Glacier National Park. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Montana Tech; 2010. [cited 2020 Jan 22]. Available from: https://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/426.

Council of Science Editors:

D'Angelo VS. Factors Influencing the Distribution of Bull Trout and Westslope Cutthroat Trout West of the Continental Divide in Glacier National Park. [Masters Thesis]. Montana Tech; 2010. Available from: https://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/426


Utah State University

3. Fok, Yu-Si. Streamflow Forecasting for Blacksmith For River, Utah.

Degree: MS, Civil and Environmental Engineering, 1959, Utah State University

PURPOSE: The method for streamflow forecasting by using Fourier Series and Multiple Regression as a mathematical model have been suggested and proved with high accuracy for the streamflow forecasting on Logan River, Utah by Professor Cleve H. Milligan and Dr. Rex L. Hurst. In this thesis the method is extended to the forecasting for the Blacksmith Fork River, south of the Logan River. Because the climatological data are not available in the Blacksmith Fork watershed, this thesis also provides a technique for using the available data from adjacent watersheds. OBJECTIVES: 1. To forecast the streamflow on Blacksmith Fork River, Cache County, Utah by using Fourier Series and Multiple Regression as a mathematical model. 2. To test the consistency of the snow, temperature, precipitation, and streamflow data by statistical methods. 3. To test the significance of the variables considered in the mathematical model. Advisors/Committee Members: Cleve H. Milligan, Rex L. Hurst, ;.

Subjects/Keywords: Multiple regression; streamflow forecasting; blacksmith fork river; climatological data; Engineering; Physical Sciences and Mathematics

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Fok, Y. (1959). Streamflow Forecasting for Blacksmith For River, Utah. (Masters Thesis). Utah State University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/6775

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fok, Yu-Si. “Streamflow Forecasting for Blacksmith For River, Utah.” 1959. Masters Thesis, Utah State University. Accessed January 22, 2020. https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/6775.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fok, Yu-Si. “Streamflow Forecasting for Blacksmith For River, Utah.” 1959. Web. 22 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Fok Y. Streamflow Forecasting for Blacksmith For River, Utah. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Utah State University; 1959. [cited 2020 Jan 22]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/6775.

Council of Science Editors:

Fok Y. Streamflow Forecasting for Blacksmith For River, Utah. [Masters Thesis]. Utah State University; 1959. Available from: https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/6775

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