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You searched for subject:(food shopping behaviors). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Brigham Young University

1. Darko, Janice. Factors Influencing Shopping, Cooking, and Eating Behaviors Among Low-Income Families During a One-Month Period of Time.

Degree: MS, 2010, Brigham Young University

Objective: To evaluate changes in shopping behaviors among low-income families over a one-month period of time in Utah County, Utah. Design: Two researchers conducted thirteen 90-minute focus groups. Setting: Two community organizations serving low-income populations and a university campus. Participants: Seventy-two low-income adults who were the primary household food shoppers and who had at least one child less than 18 years in their household. Main Outcome Measures: Shopping behavior changes during one month period of time. Analysis: Focus groups were recorded and transcribed, and then coded independently by two researchers with any differences reconciled. Paired t-tests were used to test differences of food expenditures by food group between the beginning and end-of-the-month shopping behaviors. Results: Shopping habits among low-income families changed throughout the month and were impacted by use of food assistance programs, food prices, and shopping logistics. Participants reported purchasing more varied foods at the beginning of the month versus more starch-based and canned foods at the end-of-the-month. To overcome economic barriers, participants used numerous strategies including weekly or monthly menu planning, price matching, and bulk buying. Conclusions and Implications: Low-income families make strategic decisions based on economic circumstances and other factors, including participation in food assistance programs, or the timing of the month, in order to stretch food expenditures. Our results suggest limited economics throughout the month may hinder families' ability to consume a varied, nutrient-rich diet, which may impact future health status.

Subjects/Keywords: low-income families; shopping behaviors; food assistance programs; food prices; food expenditures; Food Science; Nutrition

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APA (6th Edition):

Darko, J. (2010). Factors Influencing Shopping, Cooking, and Eating Behaviors Among Low-Income Families During a One-Month Period of Time. (Masters Thesis). Brigham Young University. Retrieved from https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3517&context=etd

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Darko, Janice. “Factors Influencing Shopping, Cooking, and Eating Behaviors Among Low-Income Families During a One-Month Period of Time.” 2010. Masters Thesis, Brigham Young University. Accessed January 19, 2020. https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3517&context=etd.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Darko, Janice. “Factors Influencing Shopping, Cooking, and Eating Behaviors Among Low-Income Families During a One-Month Period of Time.” 2010. Web. 19 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Darko J. Factors Influencing Shopping, Cooking, and Eating Behaviors Among Low-Income Families During a One-Month Period of Time. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Brigham Young University; 2010. [cited 2020 Jan 19]. Available from: https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3517&context=etd.

Council of Science Editors:

Darko J. Factors Influencing Shopping, Cooking, and Eating Behaviors Among Low-Income Families During a One-Month Period of Time. [Masters Thesis]. Brigham Young University; 2010. Available from: https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3517&context=etd


University of South Carolina

2. Sohi, Inderbir Singh. Exploration of Differences in Food Environment Perceptions and Shopping Behaviors among Residents of Low Food Access Versus High Food Access Areas.

Degree: M.S.P.H., Epidemiology and Biostatistics, 2012, University of South Carolina

Introduction: The rise in obesity rates has increased research into unhealthful dietary behaviors. Limited access to food outlets, such as grocery stores and supermarkets, is a major problem for many low income populations. Purpose: We explored potential differences in healthy food availability perceptions and food shopping behaviors between residents living in the areas designated as having low food access versus those with high food access. Methods: Data came from a cross-sectional telephone survey of 968 residents living in eight counties of South Carolina. The survey asked about residents' healthy food availability perceptions and food shopping behaviors. Data from an eight-county food environment field census were used to replicate the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) healthier food retail tract measure and USDA ERS (United States Department of Agriculture Economic Research Services) food desert measure. Ordinary Least Squares regression, which estimated adjusted means and logistic regression, which estimated odds ratios, were used to analyze the data. Results: Residents of non-healthier retail tracts, according to the CDC's designation, were significantly more likely to rate their food environment and food shopping access as poor, to travel further distances to their primarily utilized food store (10.5 vs. 6.4 miles), and to accumulate more total shopping miles per week (31.2 vs. 15.9 miles) than residents living in healthier food retail tracts. Residents of food deserts as designated by the USDA ERS food access measure, had a lower odds of shopping at a supercenter (OR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.16 - 0.95) than residents of non-food deserts. Conclusion: Residents of low food access areas had different food shopping behaviors and perceptions of healthy food availability as compared to residents of high food access areas, depending on the food access measure. The results are novel because no previous research has looked at these food access measures in conjunction with any subjective measures. These findings should motivate communities and policy advocates to use the results to better approach widespread healthy food access issues in the US. Advisors/Committee Members: Angela Liese.

Subjects/Keywords: Epidemiology; Medicine and Health Sciences; Public Health; food access; food availability; food environment perceptions; food shopping behaviors; healthy food access; low food access

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sohi, I. S. (2012). Exploration of Differences in Food Environment Perceptions and Shopping Behaviors among Residents of Low Food Access Versus High Food Access Areas. (Masters Thesis). University of South Carolina. Retrieved from https://scholarcommons.sc.edu/etd/1178

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sohi, Inderbir Singh. “Exploration of Differences in Food Environment Perceptions and Shopping Behaviors among Residents of Low Food Access Versus High Food Access Areas.” 2012. Masters Thesis, University of South Carolina. Accessed January 19, 2020. https://scholarcommons.sc.edu/etd/1178.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sohi, Inderbir Singh. “Exploration of Differences in Food Environment Perceptions and Shopping Behaviors among Residents of Low Food Access Versus High Food Access Areas.” 2012. Web. 19 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Sohi IS. Exploration of Differences in Food Environment Perceptions and Shopping Behaviors among Residents of Low Food Access Versus High Food Access Areas. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of South Carolina; 2012. [cited 2020 Jan 19]. Available from: https://scholarcommons.sc.edu/etd/1178.

Council of Science Editors:

Sohi IS. Exploration of Differences in Food Environment Perceptions and Shopping Behaviors among Residents of Low Food Access Versus High Food Access Areas. [Masters Thesis]. University of South Carolina; 2012. Available from: https://scholarcommons.sc.edu/etd/1178

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