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You searched for subject:(female reporter). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Georgia

1. Roessner, Lori Amber. Sidelined by gender: examining the representation of the female sideline reporter.

Degree: MA, Journalism and Mass Communication, 2006, University of Georgia

Tune into college football on any given autumn Saturday, and you are like to observe young, beautiful female sideline reporters. In this study, feminist critical theory and textual analysis are utilized to examine the representation of the female sideline reporter in the 2005-2006 NCAA Division I-A college football bowl season. To date, little research has been conducted on the representation and role of female sideline reporters. Analysis showed that female sideline reporters were under-represented, objectified and commodified in four select games of the 2005-2006 NCAA Division I-A college football bowl season. The study revealed that representations of female sideline reporters reproduce masculine hegemony. This study adds to the knowledge of masculine hegemony in sports casting which was more stated than corroborated. This study lays the groundwork for future examination of representations of women in journalism through the lenses of feminist critical theory and textual analysis. Advisors/Committee Members: Leara Rhodes.

Subjects/Keywords: Female Sideline Reporter

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Roessner, L. A. (2006). Sidelined by gender: examining the representation of the female sideline reporter. (Masters Thesis). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/roessner_lori_a_200612_ma

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Roessner, Lori Amber. “Sidelined by gender: examining the representation of the female sideline reporter.” 2006. Masters Thesis, University of Georgia. Accessed October 18, 2019. http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/roessner_lori_a_200612_ma.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Roessner, Lori Amber. “Sidelined by gender: examining the representation of the female sideline reporter.” 2006. Web. 18 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Roessner LA. Sidelined by gender: examining the representation of the female sideline reporter. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Georgia; 2006. [cited 2019 Oct 18]. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/roessner_lori_a_200612_ma.

Council of Science Editors:

Roessner LA. Sidelined by gender: examining the representation of the female sideline reporter. [Masters Thesis]. University of Georgia; 2006. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/roessner_lori_a_200612_ma


University of Southern California

2. Navarro, Heather Leeann. Two-faced: the image of the female political journalist in American film.

Degree: MA, Journalism, 2014, University of Southern California

While the image of the female journalist in popular culture has been explored, female journalists specifically in the political sphere have not. This body of work aims to define the traits, quirks, and ethics of the female political journalist in American film. The existing documentation shows that the female journalist certainly starts out tough, even abrasive, smart, resilient, and proud to be called a “newspaperman.” Inevitably, though, by the end of the film she melts like butter—all too willing to give up the excitement of a fulfilling career to be a housewife—to bring slippers and a sandwich to a man. This work will show how similar and how different this image is to the one digging around in the political world. This work aims to define the female political journalist in American film from the 1940s to current day. ❧ The image of the female political journalist in film is one of someone who imparts knowledge to the general public while embodying stereotypes. If the public believes in the image of the female political journalist based on films alone, the female political journalist is a walking cliché—a smart but lonely spinster. A harpy. An intelligent woman who encompasses masculine traits because to be smart is to be in power—and to be in power is masculine. ❧ A male political journalist is often seen as intelligent, and is respected, according to He Wrote, She Wrote: Journalist Gender, Political Office, and Campaign News. In the films explored, the image of the male political journalist is often portrayed as intelligent and respected, falling in line with this description. If the average person were to view only these images, he or she would believe that regardless of how intelligent and strong a female political journalist is, she will ultimately yield to a stronger and smarter man. Advisors/Committee Members: Saltzman, Joseph (Committee Chair), Hollihan, Thomas (Committee Member), Leonard, John (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: film; American film; politics; female reporter; female journalist; female; journalism; gender; gender gap; broadcast journalism; image of the female journalist; image of the journalist; Joe Saltzman; Howard Good; girl reporter; sob sisters; sob sister; spinster; journalism ethics; sex; Frank Capra; Washington story; The ides of March; Thank you for smoking; Woman of the year; State of play; Madison Avenue; The senator was indiscreet; Nothing but the truth; Lions for lambs; Katharine Hepburn; Ida Horowicz; Tess Harding; Alice Kingsley; Heather Holloway; Della Frye; Rachel Armstrong; Poppy McNaughton; Peggy Shannon; Janine Roth; movies; girl journalist; woman journalist; women in movies; women in film; IJPC; Judy Muller; Seema Mehta; Robin Abcarian; Abby Sewell; gender relations; women in journalism; American media; female journalists in film

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Navarro, H. L. (2014). Two-faced: the image of the female political journalist in American film. (Masters Thesis). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/382795/rec/7631

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Navarro, Heather Leeann. “Two-faced: the image of the female political journalist in American film.” 2014. Masters Thesis, University of Southern California. Accessed October 18, 2019. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/382795/rec/7631.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Navarro, Heather Leeann. “Two-faced: the image of the female political journalist in American film.” 2014. Web. 18 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Navarro HL. Two-faced: the image of the female political journalist in American film. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Southern California; 2014. [cited 2019 Oct 18]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/382795/rec/7631.

Council of Science Editors:

Navarro HL. Two-faced: the image of the female political journalist in American film. [Masters Thesis]. University of Southern California; 2014. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/382795/rec/7631

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