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You searched for subject:(female prophets). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Rochester

1. Garrett, Carol Marie. Can these bones live? : Ezekiel 37:1-14 : the fabric of discontent between church and community : a prophetic message.

Degree: D. Min., 2017, University of Rochester

In this dissertation, I will explore how the discontent between church and community have caused residents near and around Portland Avenue to lose hope. The valley of dry bones offers an analogy for this community with data from personal interviews revealing the downward spiral over time. This project will examine the commitment of the church to the local community, leadership, and prophetic preaching. The language used in Ezekiel 37, symbolizes the oracles of deliverance and salvation. It illustrates Ezekiel’s dilemma preaching to a community in exile. Questions to be asked are: (1) What has changed within the urban context from then to now? (2) What are the barriers that prevent the prophetic work of justice and mercy? (3) What is the commitment of the church to the community? And (4) What will be the outcome of prophetic preaching in an urban community? These questions will determine my findings regarding churches performing their prophetic work in a community identified as being hopeless. I, an African American woman and preacher, like Ezekiel was placed in the middle of a valley of the dry bones. A prophetic response is ideal for the process of social change and community survival. When prophesying to a community identified as dry bones, the church must be willing to build relationships with residents in its geographical area and create an environment that residents can reciprocate connections with the church.

Subjects/Keywords: Church; Prophetic preaching; Ezekiel; Fabric; Community; Fatal crescent; Hood; Black feminist; Female prophets; Leadership; Racism.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Garrett, C. M. (2017). Can these bones live? : Ezekiel 37:1-14 : the fabric of discontent between church and community : a prophetic message. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Rochester. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1802/32869

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Garrett, Carol Marie. “Can these bones live? : Ezekiel 37:1-14 : the fabric of discontent between church and community : a prophetic message.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Rochester. Accessed October 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1802/32869.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Garrett, Carol Marie. “Can these bones live? : Ezekiel 37:1-14 : the fabric of discontent between church and community : a prophetic message.” 2017. Web. 19 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Garrett CM. Can these bones live? : Ezekiel 37:1-14 : the fabric of discontent between church and community : a prophetic message. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Rochester; 2017. [cited 2019 Oct 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1802/32869.

Council of Science Editors:

Garrett CM. Can these bones live? : Ezekiel 37:1-14 : the fabric of discontent between church and community : a prophetic message. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Rochester; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1802/32869


University of Waikato

2. Murphy, Ngahuia Aroha Grace. Te ahi tawhito, te ahi tipua, te ahi nā Mahuika: Re-igniting native women’s ceremony .

Degree: 2019, University of Waikato

This research examines the multiple ways in which Māori, and Hawai’ian and Native American women, are re-activating feminine ceremonial forms and recovering sacred relationships with customary feminine deities. Attention is focused on the creation of personal ritual practices that respond to contemporary decolonising and ecological contexts. A mana wahine theoretical and methodological framework motivated by emancipatory agendas that seek to facilitate transformation is used. Key to mana wahine projects is the creation of space for Native women to define themselves and their own stories and knowledges. This is important because Native women’s voices, knowledge and ritual histories continue to be marginalised. Furthermore, debased colonial renditions of femininity, which have been reproduced, perpetuate patriarchal and colonial politics that engender discord in Native communities today. The study used a suite of complimentary methods to engage 45 Native women and men. Interviews and kōrero (discussion), ceremony, mana wahine wānanga (women’s sacred learning space), Native sacred site visits, solicited journals, collaboration in ritual theatre productions, and analysis of mana wahine artworks as discursive texts were employed to gather stories of spiritual continuation that are unique and largely unchartered in academia. The empirical material is organised around four themes in four different chapters. The first of these empirical chapters re-interprets colonial ethnographic material alongside karakia (incantations), mōteatea (songs), cosmological and tribal stories, to reveal bold examples of Māori female ritual leadership. The second empirical chapter comprises an analysis of key colonial processes that have attempted to erase Native women’s ritual ontologies and the strident expressions of Native women’s resistance to colonial imperatives. The third empirical chapter investigates the multiple channels through which Native women are restoring their ceremonial lives. The fourth chapter investigates rerenga atua (menstruation) rituals that celebrate the Native feminine body as a cosmological site of communion with feminine deities. The rich weave of Native women’s stories of ceremony, old and new, threads into decolonising Indigenous scholarship around the world that also seeks to recover the sacred feminine as a key site of Native sovereignty. These discussions reveal a self-renewing Native belief system based on vibrant and evolving rituals that respond directly to current socio-political, spiritual and ecological realities. Advisors/Committee Members: Longhurst, Robyn (advisor), Pihama, Leonie (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Native women's ceremony; atua wahine; mana wahine; te awa atua; Māori menstruation ceremonies; tohunga ruanuku; Native feminine cosmologies; decolonisation; Native resistance; traditional Māori feminine war rites; Native women's spiritualities; feminine world renewal rites; Kaupapa Māori; Indigenous healing; Native sovereignty; muru taua; Goddess; Priestess; Māori Female prophets; colonisation; clearing intergenerational trauma

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Murphy, N. A. G. (2019). Te ahi tawhito, te ahi tipua, te ahi nā Mahuika: Re-igniting native women’s ceremony . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Waikato. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/12668

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Murphy, Ngahuia Aroha Grace. “Te ahi tawhito, te ahi tipua, te ahi nā Mahuika: Re-igniting native women’s ceremony .” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Waikato. Accessed October 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10289/12668.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Murphy, Ngahuia Aroha Grace. “Te ahi tawhito, te ahi tipua, te ahi nā Mahuika: Re-igniting native women’s ceremony .” 2019. Web. 19 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Murphy NAG. Te ahi tawhito, te ahi tipua, te ahi nā Mahuika: Re-igniting native women’s ceremony . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Waikato; 2019. [cited 2019 Oct 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10289/12668.

Council of Science Editors:

Murphy NAG. Te ahi tawhito, te ahi tipua, te ahi nā Mahuika: Re-igniting native women’s ceremony . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Waikato; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10289/12668


Vanderbilt University

3. Christian, Mark Alan. Levites and the Plenary Reception of Revelation.

Degree: PhD, Religion, 2011, Vanderbilt University

This project offers comprehensive theory to explain the origin of certain Pentateuchal passages that though few in number contrast sharply with the dominant traditions regarding the divine revelation at Mt. Sinai/Horeb. In the exegetical analyses of the germane passages, literary-historical and redactional models have been brought to bear and situated within the current international Pentateuchal debate. The research has both confirmed problems with wide-ranging redactional models and affirmed their necessity in explaining complex interweaving of contrasting viewpoints. Traditional notions of Pentateuchal authorship have left unsolved literary and literary-historical problems, especially with respect to the developmental stages apparent in the book of Deuteronomy, a text of critical importance for this study. This dissertation has explored the connections between the prophetically linked tradition of the Plenary Reception of Revelation (PRR; Israelites received direct, unmediated revelation from God as a community) and non-elite levitical priest-prophets based outside of urban centers. The research has shown that they supported this tradition and negotiated with elite priestly supporters of the dominant tradition (the Israelite community did not receive direct but rather mediated divine revelation) in behalf of its survival among the received tradition. In addition to literary analyses, the application of social (including archaeological), political, and legal theories have revealed a close working relationship between these Levites and lay leaders. Through their involvement in the making of Israelite literature, Levites saw to the inclusion of marginalized, âpopularâ traditions in the Hebrew Bible, which otherwise comprises a repository of traditions that affirms âofficialâ perspectives. I have found the following âpopularâ traditions advocated by the Levites to be closely interconnected: the PRR, positive and perhaps repeated experiences of direct encounter with the divine, an expansive notion of Israelite sanctification, and a pronounced openness to alien integration. My research has provided a window through which both the scholars and general readers of the Hebrew Bible can better view the contributions of local, non-elite priests and their lay constituents to the culture and religion of ancient Israel. Advisors/Committee Members: Douglas A. Knight (chair), Jack M. Sasson (committee member), Annalisa Azzoni (committee member), Robert Drews (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: H; P; priestly code; torot; torah; theocratic; theocracy; redaction; redactional; priest; prophet; prophecy; priestly; elohist; Israel; Israelite priesthood; Israelite cult; priest-prophet; lay priests; quasi-priest; Verschriftung; Bearbeitung; Isaiah; Nehemiah; Leviticus; Holiness Code; Foucault; openness to the other; alien; theology; sociopolitical; political; theophany; Sinai; Horeb; Kings; sovereign; mountain of god; Yhwh; Elohim; Yahweh; Jhwh; Jesus; kumr; kmr; PRR; Phoenicia; Mesopotamia; Egypt; Persia; Persian period; Achaemenid; Achaemenid period; Neo-Babylonian; translate; translator; priestly power that empowers; reading tobit backwards and forwards; in search of halakhah; revisiting levitical authorship; hexateuch; pentateuch; enneateuch; decalogue; ten commandments; Aaron; aaronide; Zadok; zadokite; Moses; Mosegestalt; Josiah; Hezekiah; David; purity; impurity; sacerdotal; sacral; law; legal; instruction; residential cities; urban; rural; elite; Bethel; Jerusalem; Ezra; Isaiah; Deutero-Isaiah; Third Isaiah; Chronicles; Chronicler; corpus propheticum; ideology; HexRed; PentRed; School of Hexateuch redaction; School of HexRed; Deuteronomy; Deuteronomistic History; preexile; preexilic; exile; exilic; postexilic; Hellenistic; LXX; septuagint; targum; rabbi; rabbinic; priestly authorship; mosaic office; mosaic institution; covenant code; Deuteronomic code; law code; post-P; post-dtr; dtrD; Moab covenant; Horeb covenant; Sinai covenant; exodus; hebrew; greek; aramaic; tradent; iron age; bronze age; tribe; tribal; Assyrian; Akkadian; Sumerian; ancient near east; near eastern; Elephantine; kemarim; oral law; orality; Hosea; Judges; Ezekiel; Ezek 44; Exod 19; Isa 56; Jeremiah; Baruch; religious functionaries; cultic personnel; priestly personnel; foreign; contaminate; Auseinandersetzung; elders; female prophets; female prophecy; prophetess; priestess; village; Judah; yehud; judahite; northern Israel; administrative cities; northern kingdom; southern kingdom; Zion; psalms; psalter; Joshua; law of the king; D; liturgy; liturgical; enoch; fear; fear of the Lord; popular religion; official religion; middle-tier; middle-tier priests; Herrschaftswissen; levitism; Gattung; levitizing; levitisierung; Le jeu de persuasion; rhetoric; rhetorical persuasion; clergy; Samaritan Pentateuch; Zadokite-Levites; Aaronide-Levites; Book of Numbers; mediate; mediator; mediation; intermediary; Yahwistic; covenant renewal; diaspora; Offenbarung; benei yisrael; Landnahmeerzählung; Landnahme; Cultic competence; prophetic Competence; kingship; monarchy; Israelite monarchy; power network; high priest; socioreligious; centralization of the cult; mid-level priest; mid-level priests; second-level functionaries; second-level priest; residential cities; administrative cities; condensation of revelatory events; torah; torot

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Christian, M. A. (2011). Levites and the Plenary Reception of Revelation. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-12012011-135559/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Christian, Mark Alan. “Levites and the Plenary Reception of Revelation.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed October 19, 2019. http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-12012011-135559/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Christian, Mark Alan. “Levites and the Plenary Reception of Revelation.” 2011. Web. 19 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Christian MA. Levites and the Plenary Reception of Revelation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2011. [cited 2019 Oct 19]. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-12012011-135559/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Christian MA. Levites and the Plenary Reception of Revelation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2011. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-12012011-135559/ ;

.