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You searched for subject:(eye gaze cueing). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Pickron, Charisse. Not All Gaze Cues Are the Same: Face Biases Influence Object Attention in Infancy.

Degree: 2015, University of Massachusetts

In their first year, infants’ ability to follow eye gaze to allocate attention shifts from being a response to low-level perceptual cues, to a deeper understanding of social intent. By 4 months infants look longer to uncued versus cued targets following a gaze cuing event, suggesting that infants better encode targets cued by shifts in eye gaze compared to targets not cued by eye gaze. From 6 to 9 months of age infants develop biases in face processing such that they show increased differentiation of faces within highly familiar groups (e.g., own-race) and a decreased differentiation of faces within unfamiliar or infrequently experienced groups (e.g., other-race). Although the development of cued object learning and face biases are both important social processes, they have primarily been studied independently. The current study examined whether early face processing biases for familiar compared to unfamiliar groups influences object encoding within the context of a gaze-cuing paradigm. Five- and 10-month-old infants viewed videos of adults, who varied by race and sex, shift their eye gaze towards one of two objects. The two objects were then presented side-by-side and fixation duration for the cued and uncued object was measured. Results revealed 5-month-old infants look significantly longer to uncued versus cued objects when the cuing face was a female. Additionally, 10-month-old infants displayed significantly longer looking to the uncued relative to the cued object when the cuing face was a female and from the infant’s own-race group. These findings are the first to demonstrate that perceptual narrowing based on sex and race shape infants’ use of social cues for allocating visual attention to objects in their environment. Advisors/Committee Members: Lisa S. Scott, Erik Cheries, Nilanjana Dasgupta.

Subjects/Keywords: eye-gaze cueing; cued-object processing; perceptual narrowing; eye-tracking

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pickron, C. (2015). Not All Gaze Cues Are the Same: Face Biases Influence Object Attention in Infancy. (Thesis). University of Massachusetts. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.umass.edu/masters_theses_2/220

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pickron, Charisse. “Not All Gaze Cues Are the Same: Face Biases Influence Object Attention in Infancy.” 2015. Thesis, University of Massachusetts. Accessed October 16, 2019. https://scholarworks.umass.edu/masters_theses_2/220.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pickron, Charisse. “Not All Gaze Cues Are the Same: Face Biases Influence Object Attention in Infancy.” 2015. Web. 16 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Pickron C. Not All Gaze Cues Are the Same: Face Biases Influence Object Attention in Infancy. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Massachusetts; 2015. [cited 2019 Oct 16]. Available from: https://scholarworks.umass.edu/masters_theses_2/220.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Pickron C. Not All Gaze Cues Are the Same: Face Biases Influence Object Attention in Infancy. [Thesis]. University of Massachusetts; 2015. Available from: https://scholarworks.umass.edu/masters_theses_2/220

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Exeter

2. Gregory, Nicola Jean. The influence of socio-biological cues on saccadic orienting.

Degree: PhD, 2011, University of Exeter

Previous research has suggested that viewing of another’s averted eye gaze causes automatic orienting of attention and eye movements in observers due to the importance of eye gaze for effective social interaction. Other types of visual cues with no social or biological relevance, such as arrows, are claimed not to produce such a direct effect on orienting behaviour. The finding that processing of eye gaze is reduced in individuals with Autistic Spectrum Disorders as well as following damage to the orbitofrontal cortex of the brain, suggests that gaze processing is indeed critical for effective social behaviour and therefore eye gaze may constitute a “special” directional cue. This thesis tested these ideas by examining the influence of socio-biological (eye gaze and finger pointing) and non-social cues (arrows and words) on eye movement responses in both healthy control participants and those with damage to the frontal lobes of the brain. It further investigated the relationship between orienting to gaze and arrow cues and autistic traits in a healthy population. Important differences between the effects of socio-biological and non-social cues were found on saccadic eye movements. Although in the pro-saccade tasks, arrow cues caused a similar facilitation of responses in the cued direction as eye gaze and pointing cues, in the anti-saccade tasks (in which participants have to respond away from the location of a peripheral onset), arrows had a greatly reduced effect on oculomotor programming relative to the biologically relevant cues. Importantly, although the socio-biological cues continued to influence saccadic responses, the facilitation was in the opposite direction to the cues. This finding suggests that the cues were being processed within the same "anti-response" task set (i.e. "go opposite") as the target stimulus. Word cues had almost no effects on saccadic orienting in either pro- or anti-saccade tasks. Schematicised eye gaze cues had a smaller magnitude effect than photographic gaze cues suggesting that ecological validity ("biological-ness") is an important factor in influencing oculomotor responses to social cues. No relationship was found between autistic traits and orienting to gaze or arrow cues in a large sample of males. However, findings from the neurological patients point to a possible double-dissociation between the neural mechanisms subserving processing of socio-biological and non-social cues, with the former reliant on the orbitofrontal cortex, and the latter on lateral frontal cortex. Taken together, these results suggest that biologically relevant cues have privileged access to the oculomotor system. The findings are interpreted in terms of a neurocognitive model of saccadic orienting to socio-biological and non-social cues, and an extension to an existing model of saccade generation is proposed. Finally, limitations of the research, its wider impact and directions for future work are discussed.

Subjects/Keywords: 150.724; saccades : social attention : eye movements : social intelligence : gaze : attention : cueing : frontal lobes : orbitofrontal cortex : autism

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gregory, N. J. (2011). The influence of socio-biological cues on saccadic orienting. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Exeter. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10036/3231

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gregory, Nicola Jean. “The influence of socio-biological cues on saccadic orienting.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Exeter. Accessed October 16, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10036/3231.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gregory, Nicola Jean. “The influence of socio-biological cues on saccadic orienting.” 2011. Web. 16 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Gregory NJ. The influence of socio-biological cues on saccadic orienting. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Exeter; 2011. [cited 2019 Oct 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10036/3231.

Council of Science Editors:

Gregory NJ. The influence of socio-biological cues on saccadic orienting. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Exeter; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10036/3231

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