Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:(endpoint rate). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Georgia

1. Jackson, Chester W. Spatio-temporal analysis of barrier island shoreline change.

Degree: 2014, University of Georgia

Deficiencies exist in the study of shoreline dynamics of Georgia’s barrier islands and the processes that influence change. Previously unexamined shoreline localities that were difficult to assess using existing techniques and software programs provide a basis for the development of new tools and methods for analyzing change. AMBUR (Analyzing Moving Boundaries Using R) was developed to analyze shoreline change along barrier islands with complex shapes and highly curved coastlines. Built using the R programming environment, AMBUR provides a suite of functions for quantifying the rate and magnitude of shoreline movement and performs additional statistical, graphical, and geospatial analyses. The reliability of transect-based analyses is improved using new techniques for curved shorelines too problematic for the traditional perpendicular-transect method. Application of AMBUR to Georgia’s barrier islands provides a robust dataset for island-wide shoreline change and assists with classifying the modern behavior of the coast. Historical shorelines from 1855 to 2004 were analyzed and partitioned into oceanfront, backbarrier, and inlet-facing zones. Throughout the 1855 to 2004 era, 41 % of Georgia’s oceanfront shoreline eroded at a mean rate of -1.66 m/yr EPR (± 0.06 m/yr) and the remaining shoreline accreted at 2.25 m/yr EPR (± 0.06 m/yr). The backbarrier eroded along 65 % of the shore at a mean rate of -0.35 m/yr EPR (± 0.07 m/yr) throughout the period. More than half of the islands exhibit a net seaward shift in area and regressive behavior, whereas Wolf and St. Catherines Islands are thinning and shortening and are transgressive, erosional hotspots. Reversals of longshore transport currents, primarily due to inlet dynamics and seasonal shifts in climate regimes, promote periods of accretion and erosion along the northern and southern ends of some islands. Stable, migrating, and ephemeral inlet processes at the local level exert the greatest influence over oceanfront shorelines. Backbarrier shorelines are primarily influenced by tidal creek migration, proximity to inlets and confluences of other streams. Human activities are influencing shoreline erosion and accretion rates through uses of hard/soft stabilization and dredging activities.

Subjects/Keywords: shoreline change; oceanfront; backbarrier; inlet; coastal mapping; Holocene; Pleistocene; AMBUR; transect; baseline; erosion; accretion; t-sheets; aerial photography; endpoint rate; morphodynamics; anthropogenic; hard stabilization; storms; rivers; tidal

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jackson, C. W. (2014). Spatio-temporal analysis of barrier island shoreline change. (Thesis). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10724/26360

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jackson, Chester W. “Spatio-temporal analysis of barrier island shoreline change.” 2014. Thesis, University of Georgia. Accessed January 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10724/26360.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jackson, Chester W. “Spatio-temporal analysis of barrier island shoreline change.” 2014. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Jackson CW. Spatio-temporal analysis of barrier island shoreline change. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Georgia; 2014. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10724/26360.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Jackson CW. Spatio-temporal analysis of barrier island shoreline change. [Thesis]. University of Georgia; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10724/26360

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Poulopoulou, Stavroula. Adaptive designs in phase II clinical trials.

Degree: 2013, Athens University Economics and Business (AUEB); Οικονομικό Πανεπιστήμιο Αθηνών

Clinical trials play a very important role in the development process of new therapies. Recently there has been a rapid increase in the research and creation of new modern molecular agents, which makes necessary the development of more flexible and adaptive designs for the implementation of clinical trials. The objective of adaptive designs is to ensure direct and dynamic control of the effectiveness and the safety of a new treatment by allowing the adjustment of the elements of the study (i.e. sample size), during the study, in such a way that we will not sacrifice elements which arc associated with the credibility of the study (i.e statistical power) and also issues which concern ethical characteristics of the clinical trials. Under this light, the objective of this thesis is the investigation and the development of new flexible and adaptive clinical trial designs. Even though in the last years there is a huge progress in the comprehension of the pathophysiology for a great number of diseases and in the same a large number of new promising therapies have been developed, the 85% of these therapies fail at the early phases of clinical trials (Arrowsmith, 2011). One of the most important factors that could lead to an unsuccessful phase III clinical trial, is an inappropriate phase II study that provides inaccurate information about whether the therapy should proceed in a further phase III study or not (Gan et al., 2012). This is the reason why we have chosen to focus on the development of new adaptive designs for phase II clinical trials. Initially, we developed a new two-stage sample size re-estimation process, for phase II clinical trials, which enables as to adjust the required sample size based on the information given in the first stage and at the same time to maintain type I and II errors stable. While afterwards we addressed the issue that very often investigators face at the primary phases of clinical trials, which is the ambiguity in whether we have made the right choice of the targeted response level pA, which represents the level of response we believe the new therapy will have. For this reason we developed a new two-stage phase II adaptive design which allows as to adjust the response level target pA during the study, based on the data of the first stage. Based on the definition of the classical hypothesis of phase II clinical trials (H₀ : p ≤ p₀ vs HA : p ≥ pA), where p₀ is the response rate of the classical treatment and pa the target response level of the new therapy) we presented the misinterpretation problem that arises by the fact that the rejection of the null hypothesis (H₀ : p ≤ p₀) is not equivalent to the acceptance of the alternative hypothesis (HA : p ≥ pA) and vice versa which causes great confusion between statisticians and clinical investigators. In order to overcome this problem we developed a new phase II design in which we test two hypotheses sequentially (H₀₁: p ≤ p₀ vs HA₁ : p ≥ p0 and H₀₂ : p ≥ pA vs HA₂ : p < pA). The second null hypothesis (H₀₂) is tested only in the case that the…

Subjects/Keywords: Κλινικές μελέτες φάσης II; Σχεδιασμοί πολλαπλών σταδίων; Προσαρμόσιμοι σχεδιασμοί; Επανεκτίμηση μεγέθους δείγματος; Τροποποίηση ποσοστού ανταπόκρισης στόχου; Ποσοστό ανταπόκρισης ως καταληκτικό σημείο; Χρόνος μέχρι το γεγονός ως καταληκτικό σημείο; Clinical trials phase II; Multi stage designs; Adaptive designs; Re-estimation sample size; Modification of targeted response level; Response rate endpoint; Time-to-event endpoint

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Poulopoulou, S. (2013). Adaptive designs in phase II clinical trials. (Thesis). Athens University Economics and Business (AUEB); Οικονομικό Πανεπιστήμιο Αθηνών. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10442/hedi/30030

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Poulopoulou, Stavroula. “Adaptive designs in phase II clinical trials.” 2013. Thesis, Athens University Economics and Business (AUEB); Οικονομικό Πανεπιστήμιο Αθηνών. Accessed January 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10442/hedi/30030.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Poulopoulou, Stavroula. “Adaptive designs in phase II clinical trials.” 2013. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Poulopoulou S. Adaptive designs in phase II clinical trials. [Internet] [Thesis]. Athens University Economics and Business (AUEB); Οικονομικό Πανεπιστήμιο Αθηνών; 2013. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10442/hedi/30030.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Poulopoulou S. Adaptive designs in phase II clinical trials. [Thesis]. Athens University Economics and Business (AUEB); Οικονομικό Πανεπιστήμιο Αθηνών; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10442/hedi/30030

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.