Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

Dates: Last 2 Years

You searched for subject:(emergency clinical research). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Canterbury

1. Maddocks W. Skill fade in military medical training : a literature review of supraglottic airway use in the prehospital environment.

Degree: 2020, University of Canterbury

Background: Skill fade is a potential issue in any military medical training environment. Within the current New Zealand Defence Force (NZDF) medic training programme, emergency skills are taught and practised in a simulated environment but are rarely used in real-life situations. As there is infrequent exposure to emergency situations during training, there is a potential for skill fade to occur with some emergency techniques. One such technique is the use of supraglottic airway devices (SADs) as used in the prehospital emergency environment from both a military and civilian context. However, an optimum training interval has not been clearly defined for this skill within a military medic context. Purpose: This literature review explores the issue of skill fade, in particular with prehospital emergency airway management using SADs. This review can guide the framework for an evaluative study, which could be conducted in a military medic training context to help determine the extent of skill fade and how it could be mitigated through manipulation of training intervals. Material and methods: Literature was reviewed from military and civilian prehospital contexts to identify key extant studies in the use of SADs. The review has been placed in a wider context of skill fade within emergency care training in general as well as recognising the unique military contexts in which prehospital emergency care is provided. Discussion: Several studies identified that the rate of skill fade within emergency care is consistent across several medical disciplines, with skill fade occurring from around eight weeks and peak decline at six months. Different instructional methods do not seem to reduce skill fade when used in isolation, suggesting a mixed method approach is needed with regular retesting to ensure competency in the use of SADs. The review did not identify any research that specifically explored the issue of skill fade within NZDF medic training; however, the information provided would assist further research in this area.

Subjects/Keywords: Field of Research::11 - Medical and Health Sciences::1103 - Clinical Sciences::110305 - Emergency Medicine

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

W, M. (2020). Skill fade in military medical training : a literature review of supraglottic airway use in the prehospital environment. (Thesis). University of Canterbury. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10092/100778

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

W, Maddocks. “Skill fade in military medical training : a literature review of supraglottic airway use in the prehospital environment.” 2020. Thesis, University of Canterbury. Accessed October 29, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10092/100778.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

W, Maddocks. “Skill fade in military medical training : a literature review of supraglottic airway use in the prehospital environment.” 2020. Web. 29 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

W M. Skill fade in military medical training : a literature review of supraglottic airway use in the prehospital environment. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Canterbury; 2020. [cited 2020 Oct 29]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10092/100778.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

W M. Skill fade in military medical training : a literature review of supraglottic airway use in the prehospital environment. [Thesis]. University of Canterbury; 2020. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10092/100778

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Edwards, RN, Rowan. Preparing Healthcare Staff for Cardiac Arrest Codes in the Outpatient Clinical Setting: Code Drill Training Improves Patient Outcomes.

Degree: MSN, 2019, University of San Francisco

Preparing Healthcare Staff for Cardiac Arrest Codes in the Outpatient Clinical Setting: Code Drill Training Improves Patient Outcomes The acuity of care provided in outpatient clinical settings across the United States continues to rise. It is estimated that more than 350,000 cardiac arrests occur outside of a hospital each year (AHA, 2019). For the purpose of this clinical nurse leader (CNL)-lead quality improvement project, the relevant focus is directed towards improving the knowledge, physical skills and perceptions of healthcare staff within an urgent care center (UCC) regarding the application of advanced rescue skills. It is important to note that the estimated 8,000 UCC’s nationwide often bridge the gap between the shortage of primary care providers (PCP’s) while simultaneously offering afterhours urgent/emergent care services (Stoimenoff & Newman, 2017). Many economic and demographic factors affect the diversity of the patient population seen at a UCC for primary care or non-life-threatening conditions and acute injury related treatments. Sudden cardiac arrest however, knows no boundary and requires UCC staff to be proficient in advanced rescue measures that rapidly stabilize patients which increase survival rates until they can be transported emergently to a hospital. Rogers and Rund further define proficiency skills as cross-training, knowledge of cardiac rhythm strips, pacing/cardioverting and defibrillating, intravenous/intraosseous access, and appropriate medication administration such as vasopressors and antiarrhythmics for all UCC staff based on scope of practice and training (2019). The use of mock code (in situ) training, or “Code Drill” simulation, evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of the facility staff when dealing with emergent healthcare crisis such as a cardiac arrest or other cardiovascular events. Utilizing the TeamSTEPPS [see appendix A, Figures 1 & 2] approach during Code Drill simulation we will integrate and involve all staff members to advocate for the patient by implementing advanced rescue measures. These measures build greater situational team awareness, enhanced interdisciplinary communication, leadership and mutual support which work to alleviate fears, uncertainties and role confusion during a code. When these issues are addressed, the functionality of the team increases and patient outcomes improve. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Susan Mortell, DNP, RN, CNL, Dr. Elena Capella, Ed.D., MSN/MPA, RN, CNL, CPHQ, LNCC, Robin Jackson, MSN, RN, CNL.

Subjects/Keywords: Code Drill Simulation; urgent care cardiac arrest; outpatient cardiac arrest incidence rates; clinical code training for health care staff; Critical Care Nursing; Emergency Medicine; Family Medicine; Health and Medical Administration; Health Information Technology; Internal Medicine; Interprofessional Education; Medicine and Health Sciences; Nursing Administration; Other Medicine and Health Sciences; Other Nursing; Primary Care; Public Health and Community Nursing; Translational Medical Research

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Edwards, RN, R. (2019). Preparing Healthcare Staff for Cardiac Arrest Codes in the Outpatient Clinical Setting: Code Drill Training Improves Patient Outcomes. (Thesis). University of San Francisco. Retrieved from https://repository.usfca.edu/capstone/964

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Edwards, RN, Rowan. “Preparing Healthcare Staff for Cardiac Arrest Codes in the Outpatient Clinical Setting: Code Drill Training Improves Patient Outcomes.” 2019. Thesis, University of San Francisco. Accessed October 29, 2020. https://repository.usfca.edu/capstone/964.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Edwards, RN, Rowan. “Preparing Healthcare Staff for Cardiac Arrest Codes in the Outpatient Clinical Setting: Code Drill Training Improves Patient Outcomes.” 2019. Web. 29 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Edwards, RN R. Preparing Healthcare Staff for Cardiac Arrest Codes in the Outpatient Clinical Setting: Code Drill Training Improves Patient Outcomes. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of San Francisco; 2019. [cited 2020 Oct 29]. Available from: https://repository.usfca.edu/capstone/964.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Edwards, RN R. Preparing Healthcare Staff for Cardiac Arrest Codes in the Outpatient Clinical Setting: Code Drill Training Improves Patient Outcomes. [Thesis]. University of San Francisco; 2019. Available from: https://repository.usfca.edu/capstone/964

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Queensland

3. Ho, Ariel. Examination of troponin testing following implementation of the IMProved Assessment of Chest pain Trial (IMPACT) Protocol, an accelerated chest pain assessment strategy.

Degree: Faculty of Medicine, 2020, University of Queensland

Subjects/Keywords: acute coronary syndrome (ACS); accelerated diagnostic protocol (ADP); chest pain; emergency department (ED); translational research; troponin; 1103 Clinical Sciences; 1117 Public Health and Health Services

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ho, A. (2020). Examination of troponin testing following implementation of the IMProved Assessment of Chest pain Trial (IMPACT) Protocol, an accelerated chest pain assessment strategy. (Thesis). University of Queensland. Retrieved from https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:dedf853/thumbnail_s4287927_final_thesis_t.jpg ; https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:dedf853/s4287927_final_thesis.pdf ; https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:dedf853

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ho, Ariel. “Examination of troponin testing following implementation of the IMProved Assessment of Chest pain Trial (IMPACT) Protocol, an accelerated chest pain assessment strategy.” 2020. Thesis, University of Queensland. Accessed October 29, 2020. https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:dedf853/thumbnail_s4287927_final_thesis_t.jpg ; https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:dedf853/s4287927_final_thesis.pdf ; https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:dedf853.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ho, Ariel. “Examination of troponin testing following implementation of the IMProved Assessment of Chest pain Trial (IMPACT) Protocol, an accelerated chest pain assessment strategy.” 2020. Web. 29 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Ho A. Examination of troponin testing following implementation of the IMProved Assessment of Chest pain Trial (IMPACT) Protocol, an accelerated chest pain assessment strategy. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Queensland; 2020. [cited 2020 Oct 29]. Available from: https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:dedf853/thumbnail_s4287927_final_thesis_t.jpg ; https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:dedf853/s4287927_final_thesis.pdf ; https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:dedf853.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Ho A. Examination of troponin testing following implementation of the IMProved Assessment of Chest pain Trial (IMPACT) Protocol, an accelerated chest pain assessment strategy. [Thesis]. University of Queensland; 2020. Available from: https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:dedf853/thumbnail_s4287927_final_thesis_t.jpg ; https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:dedf853/s4287927_final_thesis.pdf ; https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:dedf853

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.