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You searched for subject:(electrotyping). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Colorado State University

1. McGee, Mike. Subliminal recognition.

Degree: Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.), Art, 2007, Colorado State University

In the making of Subliminal Recognition I strove to create a work of art that will engage an attentive viewer and facilitate a contemplative experience. The writing in the following pages provides background information regarding the path of exploration that led me to the ideas and processes of its creation. It is designed as a resource to facilitate both an appreciation of this work and an understanding of my intentions as an artist. Advisors/Committee Members: Bates, Haley (advisor), Harrow, Del (committee member), Kneller, Jane (committee member), Tornatzky, Cyane (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: art; electroforming; electroplating; electrotyping; metalsmith; metalsmithing

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APA (6th Edition):

McGee, M. (2007). Subliminal recognition. (Masters Thesis). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/82640

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McGee, Mike. “Subliminal recognition.” 2007. Masters Thesis, Colorado State University. Accessed January 18, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/82640.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McGee, Mike. “Subliminal recognition.” 2007. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

McGee M. Subliminal recognition. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Colorado State University; 2007. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/82640.

Council of Science Editors:

McGee M. Subliminal recognition. [Masters Thesis]. Colorado State University; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/82640


University of South Carolina

2. Makala, Jeffrey Michael. Print On Demand: Stereotyping And Electrotyping In The United States Printing Trades And Publishing Industry, 1812-1860.

Degree: PhD, English Language and Literatures, 2018, University of South Carolina

Print on Demand explores the role and significance of stereotyping and electrotyping in the United States printing trades and publishing industry during the early nineteenth century. Stereotyping—the creation of solid printing plates cast from moveable type—fundamentally changed the ways in which books (and later, periodicals) were printed. The commissioning of plates altered shop practices, distribution methods, and the author/publisher relationship. Because of this new embodiment of capital and texts in the form of printing plates, a secondhand market for stereotyped works prolonged and complicated the production and distribution of material texts. The primary focus of this study is the ways in which the printing trades and nascent publishing industry in the early nineteenth-century United States managed this transition. It examines the relationships between typefounders and the printer/publishers who employed them to cast plates, and the decisions made by publishers deciding which books to invest in plates to maximize the production and distribution of certain types of printed works. It looks at the evangelical origins of mass media in the United States through the work of the American Bible Society, whose founding coincided perfectly with the introduction of stereotyping. It also looks at the ways in which a newfound material understanding of the role of texts pervades nineteenth-century American culture, from the physicality and ubiquity of plates to the popular uses of the term stereotyping itself as a metaphor for the expansiveness and limitations of rapid technological change. Advisors/Committee Members: David S. Shields.

Subjects/Keywords: English Language and Literature; Print On Demand; Stereotyping; Electrotyping; United States; Printing Trades; Publishing Industry; 1812; 1860

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Makala, J. M. (2018). Print On Demand: Stereotyping And Electrotyping In The United States Printing Trades And Publishing Industry, 1812-1860. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of South Carolina. Retrieved from https://scholarcommons.sc.edu/etd/4604

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Makala, Jeffrey Michael. “Print On Demand: Stereotyping And Electrotyping In The United States Printing Trades And Publishing Industry, 1812-1860.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of South Carolina. Accessed January 18, 2020. https://scholarcommons.sc.edu/etd/4604.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Makala, Jeffrey Michael. “Print On Demand: Stereotyping And Electrotyping In The United States Printing Trades And Publishing Industry, 1812-1860.” 2018. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Makala JM. Print On Demand: Stereotyping And Electrotyping In The United States Printing Trades And Publishing Industry, 1812-1860. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of South Carolina; 2018. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: https://scholarcommons.sc.edu/etd/4604.

Council of Science Editors:

Makala JM. Print On Demand: Stereotyping And Electrotyping In The United States Printing Trades And Publishing Industry, 1812-1860. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of South Carolina; 2018. Available from: https://scholarcommons.sc.edu/etd/4604

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