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You searched for subject:(electrolysis pump). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Southern California

1. Li, Po-Ying. Implantable bioMEMS drug delivery systems.

Degree: PhD, Electrical Engineering, 2009, University of Southern California

To date, many drug delivery devices have been proposed, however, so far, none of them can provide all of the functions of (1) implantability, (2) precise flow control, (3) drug refillability, and (4) targeted drug delivery. In addition, for diseased tissues located in small organs (such as the eyeball) or for small animal models (such as mice) used in genetic or human disease research, (5) small device footprint and (6) reliability are required for the new generation drug delivery system. Current drug delivery techniques, such as sustained release implants or microreservoirs, offer a portion of the functions that mentioned above, but none of them can fulfill all of the requirements listed. The main reason is that these devices possess simple structures and usually provide only single function. Therefore, to fulfill all of the requirements, a multi-component device is needed.; In this thesis, we presented two system-level implantable bioMEMS drug delivery devices based on micromachining technology suitable for chronic ocular drug administration and acute drug injection in small animals. Each device contains several individual components and each component provides one of the previous mentioned functions. Combining of all these functions, these system-level devices can achieve the treatment of incurable eye diseases such as glaucoma or realize advanced engineering research such as real-time functional neuroimaging.; Two major components are introduced: (1) an electrolysis actuator and (2) a Parylene electrothermal valve. First, the MEMS electrolysis micropump features low power consumption with large actuation force which is suitable for implantation. Electrolysis pumping provides precise flow control (pL/min to uL/min) with either bolus or continuous delivery mode. The pump is microfabricated so the reduced footprint is suitable for ocular implantation. The structure of the pump is simple, so it is reliable compared to mechanical micropumps.; The first MEMS normally-closed, low power, and on-demand electrothermal valve constructed using Parylene C that enables both low power (mW) and rapid (ms) operation suitable of small animal implantation. It is also microfabricated with small device dimension. The valve can be reliably activated using constant current, linear current ramping and variable current ramping.; Each of these components was integrated into two system-level drug delivery devices: (1) an intraocular drug delivery device for the treatment of eye disease and (2) a microbolus infusion pump for real-time functional neuroimaging. First, the intraocular drug delivery device is capable of being refilled and enables targeted intraocular drug delivery. The refillable design permits long-term drug therapy and avoids repetitive surgeries. A flexible Parylene transscleral cannula allows targeted delivery to tissues in both the anterior and posterior segments of the eye. Both the ex vivo and in vivo testing were performed demonstrating the feasibility of this device for ocular drug delivery.; Finally, a disposable… Advisors/Committee Members: Meng, Ellis (Committee Chair), Kim, Eun Sok (Committee Member), Weiland, James D. (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: bellows; drug delivery device; electrolysis pump; neuroimaging; Parylene

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Li, P. (2009). Implantable bioMEMS drug delivery systems. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/562157/rec/3383

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Li, Po-Ying. “Implantable bioMEMS drug delivery systems.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed August 24, 2019. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/562157/rec/3383.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Li, Po-Ying. “Implantable bioMEMS drug delivery systems.” 2009. Web. 24 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Li P. Implantable bioMEMS drug delivery systems. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2009. [cited 2019 Aug 24]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/562157/rec/3383.

Council of Science Editors:

Li P. Implantable bioMEMS drug delivery systems. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2009. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/562157/rec/3383


Northeastern University

2. Abbott, Daniel F. The rational design of selective electrocatalysts for renewable energy devices.

Degree: PhD, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, 2015, Northeastern University

The rational design of electrocatalysts is paramount to the development of electrochemical devices. In particular, modifications to the structure and electronic properties of a particular catalyst can have a strong influence on the activity and selectivity towards various electrochemical reactions or pathways. In many cases this can lead to a particular reaction pathway being opened or closed, the formation of intermediates being stabilized or inhibited, the adsorption of poisonous species being mitigated, or the removal of poisonous species being promoted. In the this dissertation the design and characterization of catalysts for electrochemical devices (fuel cells, electrolyzers, and hydrogen pumps) will be discussed with regards to tailoring the selectivity in order to promote or inhibit certain electrochemical reactions. The electrochemical reactions of primary interest will include the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR), the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), oxygen evolution reaction (OER), and hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR).

Subjects/Keywords: electrocatalysis; electrolysis; fuel cell; hydrogen pump; methanol oxidation; ruthenium dioxide; Physical Chemistry; Catalysts; Design; Electrocatalysis; Fuel cells; Fuel pumps; Methanol; Hydrogen; Oxygen; Chemical reactions; Oxidation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Abbott, D. F. (2015). The rational design of selective electrocatalysts for renewable energy devices. (Doctoral Dissertation). Northeastern University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20128787

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Abbott, Daniel F. “The rational design of selective electrocatalysts for renewable energy devices.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Northeastern University. Accessed August 24, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20128787.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Abbott, Daniel F. “The rational design of selective electrocatalysts for renewable energy devices.” 2015. Web. 24 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Abbott DF. The rational design of selective electrocatalysts for renewable energy devices. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Northeastern University; 2015. [cited 2019 Aug 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20128787.

Council of Science Editors:

Abbott DF. The rational design of selective electrocatalysts for renewable energy devices. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Northeastern University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20128787

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