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You searched for subject:(effective contact rate). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Maryland

1. Rapatski, Brandy Lynn. The Non-Linear Transmission Dynamics of HIV/AIDS.

Degree: Applied Mathematics and Scientific Computation, 2004, University of Maryland

How infectious a person is when infected with HIV depends upon what stage of the disease the person is in. We use three stages which we call primary, asymptomatic and symptomatic. It is important to have a systematic method for computing all three infectivities so that the measurements are comparable. Using robust modeling we provide high-resolution estimates of semen infectivity by HIV disease stage. We find that the infectivity of the symptomatic stage is far higher, hence more potent, than the values that prior studies have used when modeling HIV transmission dynamics. The stage infectivity rates for semen are 0.024, 0.002, 0.299 for primary, asymptomatic and symptomatic (late-stage) respectively. Implications of our infectivity estimates and modeling for understanding heterosexual epidemics such as the Sub-Saharan African one are explored. Most models are compartment models that are based on the number of new infections per unit time. We create a new risk-based model that focuses on a susceptible person's risk of becoming infected if he has a single contact with an infected individual. Advisors/Committee Members: Yorke, James A (advisor), Suppe, Frederick (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Mathematics; Human immunodeficiency virus; infectiousness; transmission dynamics; mathematical modeling; effective contact rate

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rapatski, B. L. (2004). The Non-Linear Transmission Dynamics of HIV/AIDS. (Thesis). University of Maryland. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1903/1983

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rapatski, Brandy Lynn. “The Non-Linear Transmission Dynamics of HIV/AIDS.” 2004. Thesis, University of Maryland. Accessed January 18, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1903/1983.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rapatski, Brandy Lynn. “The Non-Linear Transmission Dynamics of HIV/AIDS.” 2004. Web. 18 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Rapatski BL. The Non-Linear Transmission Dynamics of HIV/AIDS. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Maryland; 2004. [cited 2021 Jan 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1903/1983.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Rapatski BL. The Non-Linear Transmission Dynamics of HIV/AIDS. [Thesis]. University of Maryland; 2004. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1903/1983

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Texas A&M University

2. De La Garza, Guadalupe Ray, III. Effective contact of cattle and feral swine facilitating potential foot-and-mouth disease virus transmission in southern Texas, USA rangeland.

Degree: MS, Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences, 2009, Texas A&M University

For the second study, a web-based survey was developed and distributed to all members of four major health education organizations. A total of 1,925 HEs’ completed the survey and 1,607 responses were utilized in the final analysis. This study indicated that participants had deficient knowledge and unfavorable attitudes toward the CDCproposed genomic competencies. In the third study, a theoretical model was developed to predict HEs’ likelihood to incorporate genomic competencies into their practice. Using techniques from Structural Equation Modeling (SEM), the model was tested with the same data of the second study. Findings supported the proposed theoretical model. While genomic knowledge, attitudes, and self-efficacy were significantly associated with HEs’ likelihood to incorporate genomic competencies into their practice, attitudes was the strongest predictor of likelihood. In summary, these studies indicated that participating HEs had deficient genomic knowledge, unfavorable attitudes toward a set of CDC-proposed genomic competencies, and low likelihood to adopt genomic competencies into health promotion. Relevant training should be developed and advocated. As the SEM analysis results indicated the survey findings supported the proposed theoretical model, which can be utilized to steer future training for HEs. statistics, 2) unadjusted inferential statistics, 3) stratified analysis, and 4) multivariable models. My investigation produced results in accord with generally accepted notions in addition to significant findings that interestingly counter current preconceptions. Intraspecies contact was more common than inter-species, with indirect contact occurring more frequently than direct. Direct contact between species occurred extremely rarely. The most important factors that influenced the rate of contact for both species were water, winter, and cultivated fields. Information regarding probability of infectious agent survival and transfer will be used in the future to advance current epidemiological models, including geographicautomata (Ward et al. 2007: In Press) and cellular automata models (Doran and Laffan 2005) to better understand and manage integrated domestic cattle and free-ranging wildlife populations. Such modeling provides essential and necessary knowledge for developing prevention, detection, response, and recovery strategies – employed in advance, during, and after a disease outbreak, respectively. Advisors/Committee Members: Cooper, Susan M. (advisor), Scott, H. Morgan (advisor), Cathey, James C. (committee member), Lopez, Roel R. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: effective contact rate; FMDv; epidemiology; wildlife disease management; feral swine; sus scrofa; direct indirect contact; inter-species; intra-species; modeling

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

De La Garza, Guadalupe Ray, I. (2009). Effective contact of cattle and feral swine facilitating potential foot-and-mouth disease virus transmission in southern Texas, USA rangeland. (Masters Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1387

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

De La Garza, Guadalupe Ray, III. “Effective contact of cattle and feral swine facilitating potential foot-and-mouth disease virus transmission in southern Texas, USA rangeland.” 2009. Masters Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed January 18, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1387.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

De La Garza, Guadalupe Ray, III. “Effective contact of cattle and feral swine facilitating potential foot-and-mouth disease virus transmission in southern Texas, USA rangeland.” 2009. Web. 18 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

De La Garza, Guadalupe Ray I. Effective contact of cattle and feral swine facilitating potential foot-and-mouth disease virus transmission in southern Texas, USA rangeland. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2009. [cited 2021 Jan 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1387.

Council of Science Editors:

De La Garza, Guadalupe Ray I. Effective contact of cattle and feral swine facilitating potential foot-and-mouth disease virus transmission in southern Texas, USA rangeland. [Masters Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1387

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