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You searched for subject:(eel industry). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Deakin University

1. Larkin, Brendan. Weaning and growth of Anguilla australis glass eels and elvers.

Degree: School of Ecology and Environment, 2000, Deakin University

Anguilla australis glass eels proved to be resilient and present strong aquaculture potential. General husbandry techniques, anaesthesia and prophylactic treatments were established for glass eels between 0.1 g and 2.0 g and elvers between 2.0 g and 8.0 g, caught in rivers and estuaries along the South East Coast of Victoria. The protozoan parasites Ichthyobodo and Trichodina were found to be present on arrival to the hatchery developed during different rearing treatments, and were successfully eradicated. A. australis glass eels accepted artificial food, but it was recommended first be fed a preweaning diet of minced fish flesh. A weaning regime from minced fish flesh to commercially available eel grower mash, over 15 days was established. Growth rate proved to be highly variable, both between and within groups. The highest growth rate of 2.71%/day was found when the natural diet of minced fish and Artemia was fed. The maximum growth rate when reared on an artificial diet of 1.63%/day was observed at 25°C. Growth was affected by the presence or absence of a preweaning diet, weaning diet, weaning period, temperature, but not by size or density. Once weaned, glass eels were found to perform better on commercially available grower mash than on the minced fish flesh, which was used to aid in weaning them to artificial diets. Of the water quality parameters measured stocking density was found to affect pH, Total Ammonia Nitrogen, Total Phosphorus, and Dissolved Oxygen, through not to an extent which affected growth.

Subjects/Keywords: Eel industry - Victoria; Anguillidae - Victoria; Aquaculture - Victoria

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Larkin, B. (2000). Weaning and growth of Anguilla australis glass eels and elvers. (Thesis). Deakin University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30023505

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Larkin, Brendan. “Weaning and growth of Anguilla australis glass eels and elvers.” 2000. Thesis, Deakin University. Accessed November 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30023505.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Larkin, Brendan. “Weaning and growth of Anguilla australis glass eels and elvers.” 2000. Web. 26 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Larkin B. Weaning and growth of Anguilla australis glass eels and elvers. [Internet] [Thesis]. Deakin University; 2000. [cited 2020 Nov 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30023505.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Larkin B. Weaning and growth of Anguilla australis glass eels and elvers. [Thesis]. Deakin University; 2000. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30023505

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Deakin University

2. Larkin, Brendan. The weaning and growth of Anguilla australis glass eels and elvers.

Degree: 2000, Deakin University

Anguilla australis glass eels proved to be resilient and present strong aquaculture potential. General husbandry techniques, anaesthesia and prophylactic treatments were established for glass eels between 0.1 g and 2.0 g and elvers between 2.0 g and 8.0 g, caught in rivers and estuaries along the South East Coast of Victoria. The protozoan parasites Ichthyobodo and Trichodina were found to be present on arrival to the hatchery developed during different rearing treatments, and were successfully eradicated. A. australis glass eels accepted artificial food, but it was recommended first be fed a preweaning diet of minced fish flesh. A weaning regime from minced fish flesh to commercially available eel grower mash, over 15 days was established. Growth rate proved to be highly variable, both between and within groups. The highest growth rate of 2.71%/day was found when the natural diet of minced fish and Artemia was fed. The maximum growth rate when reared on an artificial diet of 1.63%/day was observed at 25°C. Growth was affected by the presence or absence of a preweaning diet, weaning diet, weaning period, temperature, but not by size or density. Once weaned, glass eels were found to perform better on commercially available grower mash than on the minced fish flesh, which was used to aid in weaning them to artificial diets. Of the water quality parameters measured stocking density was found to affect pH, Total Ammonia Nitrogen, Total Phosphorus, and Dissolved Oxygen, through not to an extent which affected growth.

Subjects/Keywords: eels; eel industry; aquaculture; anguillidae; glass eels; elvers; weaning eels

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Larkin, B. (2000). The weaning and growth of Anguilla australis glass eels and elvers. (Thesis). Deakin University. Retrieved from http://tux.lib.deakin.edu.au./adt-VDU/public/adt-VDU20060713.113837

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Larkin, Brendan. “The weaning and growth of Anguilla australis glass eels and elvers.” 2000. Thesis, Deakin University. Accessed November 26, 2020. http://tux.lib.deakin.edu.au./adt-VDU/public/adt-VDU20060713.113837.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Larkin, Brendan. “The weaning and growth of Anguilla australis glass eels and elvers.” 2000. Web. 26 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Larkin B. The weaning and growth of Anguilla australis glass eels and elvers. [Internet] [Thesis]. Deakin University; 2000. [cited 2020 Nov 26]. Available from: http://tux.lib.deakin.edu.au./adt-VDU/public/adt-VDU20060713.113837.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Larkin B. The weaning and growth of Anguilla australis glass eels and elvers. [Thesis]. Deakin University; 2000. Available from: http://tux.lib.deakin.edu.au./adt-VDU/public/adt-VDU20060713.113837

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Lincoln University

3. Talbot, John. South Canterbury’s eels : towards bicultural management.

Degree: 1994, Lincoln University

A preliminary proposal for bi-cultural management of the eel resource of South Canterbury, intended as a basis for negotiation with Maori, is developed after review of relevant information available from within the Pakeha culture. The proposal takes into account only previously published Maori viewpoints. Frameworks for development of a bi-cultural partnership in resource management in New Zealand based on the Treaty of Waitangi are described. The importance of eels to Maori and to Pakeha is explored. Although most Pakeha have little interest in eels, there is a significant commercial fishery and associated eel export industry. By contrast, eels are of great significance to Maori, who particularly value them as food. Maori have expressed grave concern at the state of the eel fishery, and attribute its decline to commercial fishing, habitat destruction and pollution. The recently negotiated arrangements for fishing rights are described. Current, and preferred future, management arrangements for the eel fishery are outlined. The proposal for bi-cultural management of South Canterbury eels involves closing some areas to commercial fishing, developing the commercial fishery along lines negotiated at national level, shifting Crown management of the non-commercial eel fishery to the Department of Conservation, and promoting enhancement and restoration of eel habitat through a co-operative working party involving all stakeholders.

Subjects/Keywords: eels; eel fisheries; Canterbury; New Zealand; Maori; fishing; bicultural management; bicultural resource management; Treaty of Waitangi; Ngai Tahu Resource Management Strategy; Resource Management Act 1991; eel industry; 050205 Environmental Management; 050209 Natural Resource Management; 070403 Fisheries Management; 180203 Te Tiriti O Waitangi (The Treaty of Waitangi)

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Talbot, J. (1994). South Canterbury’s eels : towards bicultural management. (Thesis). Lincoln University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10182/4452

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Talbot, John. “South Canterbury’s eels : towards bicultural management.” 1994. Thesis, Lincoln University. Accessed November 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10182/4452.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Talbot, John. “South Canterbury’s eels : towards bicultural management.” 1994. Web. 26 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Talbot J. South Canterbury’s eels : towards bicultural management. [Internet] [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 1994. [cited 2020 Nov 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/4452.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Talbot J. South Canterbury’s eels : towards bicultural management. [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 1994. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/4452

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.