Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

You searched for subject:(ecologische successie). One record found.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters

1. Li, Bingxi. A clash of plants : Vegetation succession and its interaction with permafrost dynamics in the Arctic lowland tundra.

Degree: 2017, Wageningen University

Arctic ecosystems have been affected by severe climate change during the last decades. The increase in temperature in the Arctic has been almost double of the global rate of warming since the beginning of the 20th century. Like other ecosystems in the high latitude region, Arctic tundra appears to be extremely sensitive to the continuous warming of the past decades, which has led to dramatic vegetation changes such as rapid shrub expansion. While researchers are keen to talk about the shrubification of the Arctic tundra, there has been rather little attention for alternative vegetation shifts, such as those related to local permafrost collapse in lowland tundra. The general vegetation succession route of the ice-rich lowland tundra ecosystem is yet largely unknown. Therefore, we choose a typical Arctic lowland site (Kytalyk natural reserve) in the Northeastern Siberia to explore how vegetation is changing in this ecosystem, and how changes in the abiotic environment and vegetation succession interact. On the basis of field observations I assumed that the plant species composition of each vegetation patch at the study site changes continuously following cycles over time. To test this assumption, two multiple-year field experiments (Chapter 2 and Chapter 3) were carried out. In addition, we applied dendrochronological techniques (Chapter 4 and Chapter 5) and molecular tools (Chapter 4). On the basis of the results of these studies, I depicted a complete vegetation succession loop in the Arctic lowland tundra, which is closely related to the dynamics of the permafrost. In this vegetation succession loop, four stages with distinctive vegetation types have been identified. The Betula nana L. shrubs mainly dominate the well-drained elevated areas. In a field experiment, removal of B. nana shrubs resulted in abrupt permafrost degradation, rapid soil moisture increase and invasion of the grass species Arctagrostis latifolia (R. Br.) Griseb. After a short time period, when small ponds or drainages had developed, this fast-responding grass species is replaced by Eriophorum sedges. In the subsequent stage the Sphagnum mosses invade the sedge vegetation. The new Sphagnum moss carpets not only suppress the growth of Eriophorum sedges, but also create moist but unsaturated substrates that appear to be appropriate for the germination of B. nana seeds. These conditions provide new opportunities for B. nana shrubs to establish. The reproduction mode of B. nana at the study site has been studied using molecular tools (micro- satellites), as it may explain how existing B. nana patches developed and how shrub vegetation may expand in the future (Chapter 4). The conventional point of view is that sexual reproduction of perennial plants in the Arctic tundra, like B. nana, is rare due to the pressure of the harsh environment. However, the results of our molecular study (Chapter 4) tell a different story. While vegetative reproduction of B. nana is common, sexual reproduction of B. nana is more prevalent. Seed… Advisors/Committee Members: Wageningen University, F. Berendse, M.M.P.D. Heijmans.

Subjects/Keywords: ecologische successie; ecologie; plantensuccessie; vegetatie; toendra; permafrost; laaglandgebieden; arctische gebieden; siberiƫ; Ecologie (algemeen); Plantenecologie; ecological succession; ecology; plant succession; vegetation; tundra; permafrost; lowland areas; arctic regions; siberia; Ecology (General); Plant Ecology

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Li, B. (2017). A clash of plants : Vegetation succession and its interaction with permafrost dynamics in the Arctic lowland tundra. (Doctoral Dissertation). Wageningen University. Retrieved from http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/524879 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-524879 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-524879 ; http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/524879

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Li, Bingxi. “A clash of plants : Vegetation succession and its interaction with permafrost dynamics in the Arctic lowland tundra.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Wageningen University. Accessed January 20, 2020. http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/524879 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-524879 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-524879 ; http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/524879.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Li, Bingxi. “A clash of plants : Vegetation succession and its interaction with permafrost dynamics in the Arctic lowland tundra.” 2017. Web. 20 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Li B. A clash of plants : Vegetation succession and its interaction with permafrost dynamics in the Arctic lowland tundra. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Wageningen University; 2017. [cited 2020 Jan 20]. Available from: http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/524879 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-524879 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-524879 ; http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/524879.

Council of Science Editors:

Li B. A clash of plants : Vegetation succession and its interaction with permafrost dynamics in the Arctic lowland tundra. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Wageningen University; 2017. Available from: http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/524879 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-524879 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-524879 ; http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/524879

.