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You searched for subject:(ecocultural sustainability). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of New Mexico

1. Hoffmann, Jeffrey. ORGANIC IS MORE OF AN AMERICAN TERM – WE ARE TRADITIONAL FARMERS': DISCOURSES OF PLACE-BASED ORGANIC FARMING, COMMUNITY, HERITAGE, AND SUSTAINABILITY.

Degree: Department of Communication and Journalism, 2014, University of New Mexico

The following study looks at how traditional, organic, cooperative farmers who are starting a new farming cooperative in the Albuquerque South Valley in New Mexico communicate about their farming as a set of (sustainable) cultural practices. The study draws on environmental communication theories, the theory of the Coordinated Management of Meaning, and Actor Network Theory to construct a communication-based framework through which to view farmers stories about sustainability and visions for the future of their farming cooperative. This framework is productive, showing how some Nuevo Mexicano farmers (and others) orient toward farming, sustenance, and human-nature relationships through community, family, heritage, education, and resistance to agribusiness models, among other orientations. Finally, the study looks at how these farmers orient toward sustainability, and how they see their work as sustainable practice. Advisors/Committee Members: Milstein, Tema, Littlejohn, Stephen, Weiss, David, Hendry, Judith.

Subjects/Keywords: Environmental/Ecocultural Communication; Cooperative Organic Farming; Heritage; Sustainability

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hoffmann, J. (2014). ORGANIC IS MORE OF AN AMERICAN TERM – WE ARE TRADITIONAL FARMERS': DISCOURSES OF PLACE-BASED ORGANIC FARMING, COMMUNITY, HERITAGE, AND SUSTAINABILITY. (Masters Thesis). University of New Mexico. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1928/24488

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hoffmann, Jeffrey. “ORGANIC IS MORE OF AN AMERICAN TERM – WE ARE TRADITIONAL FARMERS': DISCOURSES OF PLACE-BASED ORGANIC FARMING, COMMUNITY, HERITAGE, AND SUSTAINABILITY.” 2014. Masters Thesis, University of New Mexico. Accessed December 08, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1928/24488.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hoffmann, Jeffrey. “ORGANIC IS MORE OF AN AMERICAN TERM – WE ARE TRADITIONAL FARMERS': DISCOURSES OF PLACE-BASED ORGANIC FARMING, COMMUNITY, HERITAGE, AND SUSTAINABILITY.” 2014. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Hoffmann J. ORGANIC IS MORE OF AN AMERICAN TERM – WE ARE TRADITIONAL FARMERS': DISCOURSES OF PLACE-BASED ORGANIC FARMING, COMMUNITY, HERITAGE, AND SUSTAINABILITY. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of New Mexico; 2014. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/24488.

Council of Science Editors:

Hoffmann J. ORGANIC IS MORE OF AN AMERICAN TERM – WE ARE TRADITIONAL FARMERS': DISCOURSES OF PLACE-BASED ORGANIC FARMING, COMMUNITY, HERITAGE, AND SUSTAINABILITY. [Masters Thesis]. University of New Mexico; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/24488


University of New Mexico

2. Alhinai, Maryam A. Humanature Relations in Oman: Connections, Disconnections and Globalization.

Degree: Department of Communication and Journalism, 2017, University of New Mexico

In this dissertation, I explore agricultural practices as a window into ecocultural communication. Using agricultural practices of villagers in Village G, Oman, as a case study, I explore the ways in which villagers and government officials conceptualize humanature relations and the forces that enhance and/or impede these relations. My specific goals for this study were: (1) to build an interpretive understanding of ecocultural orientations of villagers and officials in Oman and how they conceptualize their humanature relations; (2) to critically examine ideologies and uncover structural forces that enable/constrain humanature relations; and (3) to co-create community engagement work that honors the ecocultural wisdom of farmers, promotes economic viability, and enhances ecocultural sustainability. Accordingly, I ask a set of three questions: RQ 1: What grassroots core ecocultural premises do Omani villagers communicate?, RQ 2: What core ecocultural premises do official government documents and officials discourse communicate in Oman?, and RQ 3: How does analysis of core components of critical community engagement inform researcher-villager-governmental collaborations to design sustainable practices? To answer these questions, I collected data through focus groups, individual interviews, participant observation and official government documents. Using Cultural Discourse Analysis (Carbaugh, 2007) and Community Engagement Framework (Collier, 2014) I identify three ecocultural premises in grassroots discourse: (1) Relations-in-place, (2) kinship-in-place and (3) nurturance-in-place, and four ecocultural premises in governmental discourse: (1) Modern agriculture is more effective than traditional agriculture, (2) Imported food and modern technology feed a growing population, (3) Technologized farming attracts youth, (4) Modern agriculture and profit-motivated practices achieve sustainability but traditional farming is not sustainable. I offer a date palm metaphor as an organizing principle that depicts humanature relations and the contextual factors that enhance and/or hinder these relations. Because date palms have shown resilience over harsh ecological conditions when water was scarce in Oman and heat was high, in this project, I use the date palm as a metaphor that exhibits an alternative discourse to globalized neoliberal ideological discourses. Advisors/Committee Members: Tema Milstein, Mary Jane Collier, Ilia Rodriguez, John Carr.

Subjects/Keywords: Oman; culture; nature; globalization; ecocultural sustainability; environmental communication; Communication; Critical and Cultural Studies; International and Intercultural Communication

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Alhinai, M. A. (2017). Humanature Relations in Oman: Connections, Disconnections and Globalization. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New Mexico. Retrieved from https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/cj_etds/100

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Alhinai, Maryam A. “Humanature Relations in Oman: Connections, Disconnections and Globalization.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New Mexico. Accessed December 08, 2019. https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/cj_etds/100.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Alhinai, Maryam A. “Humanature Relations in Oman: Connections, Disconnections and Globalization.” 2017. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Alhinai MA. Humanature Relations in Oman: Connections, Disconnections and Globalization. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New Mexico; 2017. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/cj_etds/100.

Council of Science Editors:

Alhinai MA. Humanature Relations in Oman: Connections, Disconnections and Globalization. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New Mexico; 2017. Available from: https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/cj_etds/100


University of New Mexico

3. Castro-Sotomayor, José R. Translating Global Nature: Territoriality, Environmental Discourses, and Ecocultural Identities.

Degree: Department of Communication and Journalism, 2018, University of New Mexico

In this study, I explore environmental discourses circulating among Indigenous transboundary organizations working on environmental initiatives at the border between Ecuador and Colombia. I focus on three global environmental discourses –sustainability, development, and climate change– as they are at the core of the global environmental governance vernacular. La Gran Familia Awá Binacional (GFAB), one of the few transboundary Indigenous organizations working along the binational border, utilizes these global concepts to frame their environmental initiatives and projects. I use a critical and interpretive qualitative approach to investigate, deconstruct, and rearticulate global environmental discourses circulating among and translated by two of the organizations forming the GFAB: Federación de Centros Awá del Ecuador (FCAE) and Unidad Indígena del Pueblo Awá (UNIPA) from Colombia. I conducted in-depth interviews with cultural and political elites working in, or related to, these Awá organizations. I analyze interview texts, Awá organizations’ community-based plans, official government documents, and NGOs reports to understand (1) How does the GFAB understand, construct, and reproduce their relationships with their territories?; (2) How does the GFAB translate the global environmental discourses of development, sustainability, and climate change at the level of the communities with which this organization works?; and (3) What are the politics of identity, ecocultural identities and positionings, that emerge from Awá’s translation of and engagement with development, sustainability, and climate change within Awá’s territoriality? To answer these questions, I investigate how transboundary Indigenous communities construct a sense of territory, navigate global environmental discourses, and negotiate multiple ecocultural identities. I describe the articulations among relationships and principles that configure Awá’s territoriality. Then, I situate the notion of translation in relation to Awá’s territory, katza su, to explore the system of meanings implicated in Awá’s translation of the global environmental discourses of development, sustainability, and climate change. I illustrate how Awá recontextualize and emplace these discourses once they enter the material and discursive realm of Awá’s territoriality. Finally, I further the notion of territory and territoriality to investigate the formation of Awá, mestizos, and Afros’ ecocultural identities. I illustrate how two dialectics, insider-outsider and respect-disrespect, work in the discursive positioning of these populations as restorative or unwholesome ecocultural identities. In closing, I propose a rhizomatic situational analysis framework to map factors, forces, and processes, and demonstrate its applicability by presenting a situational analysis of the Awá binational Indigenous people. The rhizome illuminates Awá’s translation of development, sustainability, and climate change, and the ecocultural identities that emerge through processes of… Advisors/Committee Members: Tema Milstein, Mary Jane Collier, Ilia Rodriguez, Chris Duvall.

Subjects/Keywords: Awá; territoriality; environmental discourses; ecocultural identities; transboundary organizations; translation; Communication; Community-Based Research; Critical and Cultural Studies; Environmental Education; Environmental Studies; International and Intercultural Communication; Latin American Studies; Nature and Society Relations; Other Communication; Place and Environment; Sustainability

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Castro-Sotomayor, J. R. (2018). Translating Global Nature: Territoriality, Environmental Discourses, and Ecocultural Identities. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New Mexico. Retrieved from https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/cj_etds/117

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Castro-Sotomayor, José R. “Translating Global Nature: Territoriality, Environmental Discourses, and Ecocultural Identities.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New Mexico. Accessed December 08, 2019. https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/cj_etds/117.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Castro-Sotomayor, José R. “Translating Global Nature: Territoriality, Environmental Discourses, and Ecocultural Identities.” 2018. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Castro-Sotomayor JR. Translating Global Nature: Territoriality, Environmental Discourses, and Ecocultural Identities. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New Mexico; 2018. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/cj_etds/117.

Council of Science Editors:

Castro-Sotomayor JR. Translating Global Nature: Territoriality, Environmental Discourses, and Ecocultural Identities. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New Mexico; 2018. Available from: https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/cj_etds/117

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