Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:(eco gothic). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Tasmania

1. Condren, VM. Writing in “the midst of an unfolding disaster” : ecocritical perspectives on contemporary imaginative representations of Tasmanian wilderness.

Degree: 2017, University of Tasmania

This thesis argues that in the midst of an unfolding ecological disaster contemporary Australian authors and filmmakers are eschewing stereotypical Gothic and Romantic depictions of Tasmania’s wilderness, and instead, are repositioning the nonhuman—the environment and wildlife—as more threatened than threatening. Emerging from colonial discourse Tasmania’s particular aesthetic heritage developed around a series of double visions involving the representation (or absence) of Aborigines in the landscape. Ian McLean captures this tension in the concept of the “fractured aesthetic,” which provides a point of departure for my analysis. I adapt and apply the fractured aesthetic through my ecocritical readings of eight contemporary fictional texts, all set in the Tasmanian wilderness. In contrast to McLean I focus on the representation (or absence) of anthropogenic degradation, resulting from exploitation of the island’s natural resources. Ultimately, representations of human/nonhuman kinship, rather than intra-human relationships of power direct my textual analysis. To this end, and drawing on the work of Lawrence Buell, Kate Rigby, Serenella Iovino, Greg Garrard, Richard Kerridge, Emily Potter, and other leading scholars of ecocriticism, I synthesise posthumanist ideas of shared materiality that engage recent theories of kinship, entanglement, nonhuman agency, affective narration and ideas of hope through environmental prophecy. Tasmania’s rich literary and environmental history is apparent in the body of work analysed. The selected texts are: The Tale of Ruby Rose (1987), a film directed by Roger Scholes; Death of a River Guide (1994) and The Sound of One Hand Clapping (1997), both written by Richard Flanagan; The Hunter (1999) novel by Julia Leigh and the film adaptation, The Hunter (2011), directed by Daniel Nettheim; The World Beneath (2009), by Cate Kennedy; The River Wife (2009), by Heather Rose and The Blue Cathedral (2011) by Cameron Hindrum. Ecocriticism of these novels and films remains scarce and I address this gap by exploring ways in which these texts represent nonhuman agency while also acknowledging the sense of shared materiality at the core of human/nonhuman kinship. After a contextual discussion of wilderness ideology generally, and Tasmanian wilderness representation particularly, I explore the lingering “Tasmanian Gothic” aesthetic which depicts the environment as threatening, as enemy and/or “monster.” The textual analysis demonstrates a shift in consciousness apparent in residual Romantic aesthetics, reworked to include ecocritical perspectives on the sublime and nonhuman agency. Genre is examined, through the power of fairy tale and magic realism, to represent unfolding environmental disasters, and also through satire, to represent the ethical ambiguities of “showcasing” wilderness. In addition, I explore how co-presence between human and nonhuman communities can become toxic co-dependence. The ethical implications of dystopian and/or more optimistic representations of extinction, loss of…

Subjects/Keywords: ecocriticism; wilderness representation; Tasmania; eco-gothic

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Condren, V. (2017). Writing in “the midst of an unfolding disaster” : ecocritical perspectives on contemporary imaginative representations of Tasmanian wilderness. (Thesis). University of Tasmania. Retrieved from https://eprints.utas.edu.au/23779/1/Condren_whole_thesis.pdf

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Condren, VM. “Writing in “the midst of an unfolding disaster” : ecocritical perspectives on contemporary imaginative representations of Tasmanian wilderness.” 2017. Thesis, University of Tasmania. Accessed April 14, 2021. https://eprints.utas.edu.au/23779/1/Condren_whole_thesis.pdf.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Condren, VM. “Writing in “the midst of an unfolding disaster” : ecocritical perspectives on contemporary imaginative representations of Tasmanian wilderness.” 2017. Web. 14 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Condren V. Writing in “the midst of an unfolding disaster” : ecocritical perspectives on contemporary imaginative representations of Tasmanian wilderness. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Tasmania; 2017. [cited 2021 Apr 14]. Available from: https://eprints.utas.edu.au/23779/1/Condren_whole_thesis.pdf.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Condren V. Writing in “the midst of an unfolding disaster” : ecocritical perspectives on contemporary imaginative representations of Tasmanian wilderness. [Thesis]. University of Tasmania; 2017. Available from: https://eprints.utas.edu.au/23779/1/Condren_whole_thesis.pdf

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Iowa State University

2. Rothlisberger, Miles. Eco-planetary pantheon: Environmental horror in Harlan Ellison’s Deathbird Stories.

Degree: 2019, Iowa State University

​During the environmentalist movement of the 1960s and 1970s, speculative fiction writer Harlan Ellison published a collection of short stories titled Deathbird Stories that perfectly accomplished and still accomplishes the goals of the movement. Following both the pre-established American tradition of the ecogothic and the patterns of the revolutionary “New Wave” era of science fiction, many stories in Ellison’s anthology set out to terrify and encourage ecological awareness in readers. These stories do this by featuring wrathful and unforgiving gods that represent nature – animal and nonanimal. These godly “ecological horrors” displace and alienate readers with their fantastical elements and graphic and brutal actions, thereby creating a painful yet memorable metaphor to force readers to see how those actions came about, often leading to reflection over reality. This reflection, then, leads to introspection, and allows Ellison to effectively reach and warn and advise his readers even today to think with caution and respect toward the environment that was once ravaged.

Subjects/Keywords: Deathbird; Eco-Gothic; Eco-Horror; Environmentalism; Harlan Ellison; Science fiction; English Language and Literature

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rothlisberger, M. (2019). Eco-planetary pantheon: Environmental horror in Harlan Ellison’s Deathbird Stories. (Thesis). Iowa State University. Retrieved from https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/etd/17772

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rothlisberger, Miles. “Eco-planetary pantheon: Environmental horror in Harlan Ellison’s Deathbird Stories.” 2019. Thesis, Iowa State University. Accessed April 14, 2021. https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/etd/17772.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rothlisberger, Miles. “Eco-planetary pantheon: Environmental horror in Harlan Ellison’s Deathbird Stories.” 2019. Web. 14 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Rothlisberger M. Eco-planetary pantheon: Environmental horror in Harlan Ellison’s Deathbird Stories. [Internet] [Thesis]. Iowa State University; 2019. [cited 2021 Apr 14]. Available from: https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/etd/17772.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Rothlisberger M. Eco-planetary pantheon: Environmental horror in Harlan Ellison’s Deathbird Stories. [Thesis]. Iowa State University; 2019. Available from: https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/etd/17772

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Baylor University

3. -5395-3137. Liminal landscapes and liminal lives in Sarah Orne Jewett’s Strangers and Wayfarers.

Degree: MA, Baylor University. Dept. of English., 2020, Baylor University

Sarah Orne Jewett’s short story collection, Strangers and Wayfarers, unifies itself around explorations of liminal places and liminal people and dramatizes themes central to liminality and borderlands studies, postcolonial theory, and ecofeminism. I examine the representations of liminal settings and liminal subjects in the light of these theoretical frameworks in order to draw attention to Jewett’s tripartite purpose of recovery, preservation, and advocacy for the most vulnerable landscapes and people of her day. The first chapter of this project looks at the three categories of liminal space in the collection, the physical, cultural, and supernatural, culminating in amplifying Jewett’s call to action against the homogenization of modern urbanity. The second chapter considers the types of liminal figures found in the collection, the transient, the queer, the monster, and the perimenopausal and the ways in which these characters reflect aspects of Jewett’s own authorial liminality. Advisors/Committee Members: Walden, Daniel P. (Dan). (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Sarah Orne Jewett. Regionalism. Liminality. Ecofeminism. Borderlands. Postcolonial theory. Contact zones. Eco gothic. Code switching. Strangers and Wayfarers.

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

-5395-3137. (2020). Liminal landscapes and liminal lives in Sarah Orne Jewett’s Strangers and Wayfarers. (Masters Thesis). Baylor University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2104/11014

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

-5395-3137. “Liminal landscapes and liminal lives in Sarah Orne Jewett’s Strangers and Wayfarers.” 2020. Masters Thesis, Baylor University. Accessed April 14, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2104/11014.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

-5395-3137. “Liminal landscapes and liminal lives in Sarah Orne Jewett’s Strangers and Wayfarers.” 2020. Web. 14 Apr 2021.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Vancouver:

-5395-3137. Liminal landscapes and liminal lives in Sarah Orne Jewett’s Strangers and Wayfarers. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Baylor University; 2020. [cited 2021 Apr 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2104/11014.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Council of Science Editors:

-5395-3137. Liminal landscapes and liminal lives in Sarah Orne Jewett’s Strangers and Wayfarers. [Masters Thesis]. Baylor University; 2020. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2104/11014

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

.