Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:(drylot). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Saskatchewan

1. Dharmasiri Gamage, Ruwini. Utilization of Stockpiled Perennial Forages in Winter Feeding Systems for Beef Cattle.

Degree: 2014, University of Saskatchewan

Two experiments were conducted to determine the effects of grazing stockpiled perennial forage in field paddocks relative to feeding similar quality round bale hay in drylot pens on rumen degradation characteristics of forage; beef cow performance, cow reproductive efficiency, estimated dry matter intake and forage utilization, forage yield and quality, soil nutrients and system costs. Winter feeding systems were (i) stockpiled perennial forage (TDN = 58.9%; CP = 8.5%) grazing (SPF) and (ii) drylot feeding (DL) of round bale hay (TDN = 57.9%; CP = 8.4%). Experiment I was an in situ study, where five Hereford heifers (398 ± 14 kg) fitted with rumen cannulae were fed a grass hay (DM = 93.2%; TDN = 50.8%; CP = 9.8%; NDF = 66.2%) diet. In situ degradability of both stockpiled forage (SPF) and round bale hay (BH) samples collected at start (October) and end (December) of the field study were determined. The soluble fraction (S) of DM was greater (P = 0.01) in SPF October forage compared to SPF December, BH October and BH December forages. The potentially degradable fraction (D) of CP was lowest (P = 0.04) in BH December forage than in SPF October, SPF December and BH October forages suggesting that hay quality declined more rapidly than stockpiled forage and method of preservation may have affected overall hay quality. Furthermore, D fraction of both ADF and NDF was higher in SPF samples suggesting stockpiled forage may be more digestible than hay. However, the D fraction of NDF in both SPF and BH forages declined with later sampling date possibly due to effect of weathering and leaf loss. In Experiment II, 6, 4-ha paddocks consisting of meadow bromegrass (Bromus riparius Rehm) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa), were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 replicated (n = 3) winter feeding systems. In this study 58 dry pregnant (120 ± 16 d) Angus cows (675 kg ± 51 kg), stratified by body weight (BW; corrected for conceptus gain), were allocated to either the SPF or DL systems. Cows in winter feeding systems were provided additional energy supplement (rolled barley) (TDN = 86.4%; CP = 12.4%) depending on environmental conditions to maintain body condition, with no weight gain above that of conceptus growth. Dry matter intake (DMI) and forage utilization were estimated using the herbage weight disappearance method. The effects of winter feeding systems on soil nutrients were determined the following spring after winter grazing. Forage yield in DL (4683 ± 495 kg ha-1) and SPF (4032 ± 495 kg ha-1) systems was not different (P = 0.18) between treatments. However, forage utilization was lower (P < 0.01) in SPF (83.5%) than the DL (94.4%) system, signifying lower accessibility to stockpiled forage due to snow depth, lower temperatures, freezing rain and wind. Cows in the SPF system had higher forage DMI (P = 0.04) and supplementation intake (P < 0.01) compared to cows in drylot pens likely a combined effect of effective ambient temperatures below the lower critical temperature (LCT) during the grazing period and the higher potentially… Advisors/Committee Members: Lardner, Herbert A., Penner, Gregory B., Schoenau, Jeff J..

Subjects/Keywords: stockpiled perennial forages; drylot; beef cows

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Dharmasiri Gamage, R. (2014). Utilization of Stockpiled Perennial Forages in Winter Feeding Systems for Beef Cattle. (Thesis). University of Saskatchewan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2014-04-1500

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dharmasiri Gamage, Ruwini. “Utilization of Stockpiled Perennial Forages in Winter Feeding Systems for Beef Cattle.” 2014. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan. Accessed April 11, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2014-04-1500.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dharmasiri Gamage, Ruwini. “Utilization of Stockpiled Perennial Forages in Winter Feeding Systems for Beef Cattle.” 2014. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Dharmasiri Gamage R. Utilization of Stockpiled Perennial Forages in Winter Feeding Systems for Beef Cattle. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2014. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2014-04-1500.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Dharmasiri Gamage R. Utilization of Stockpiled Perennial Forages in Winter Feeding Systems for Beef Cattle. [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2014-04-1500

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Iowa State University

2. Purevjav, Tsengeg. Incorporating condensed corn distillers solubles into an integrated pasture and drylot finishing system for feedlot steers.

Degree: 2008, Iowa State University

The objectives of this experiment were to evaluate the use of condensed corn distillers solubles (CCDS) mixed with chopped corn stalks on an intensive cool-season pasture and drylot growing-finishing program. A three-year study was conducted, using 112 Angus and Angus crossbred steer calves each year. Calves were weighed and assigned to four treatment groups by weight and color pattern, with four replications, and seven cattle per replication in each year. Treatments one (FEEDLOT) and two (F+CCDS) were fed in the feedlot from May until harvested. FEEDLOT included chopped alfalfa hay and corn, and F+CCDS included chopped corn stalks and CCDS. Treatment three (PASTURE) and four (P+CCDS) utilized rotational smooth bromegrass pasture grazing (May-September) with P+CCDS also receiving chopped corn stalks and CCDS. Following pasture, chopped alfalfa hay and corn for PASTURE treatment, and chopped corn stalks with CCDS for P+CCDS treatment were provided during the feedlot finishing period. Steers were weighed every 28 days, and daily feed intake was recorded to obtain feed consumption and feed conversion among the treatments during drylot feeding. The smooth bromegrass pasture consisted of 24 paddocks, each 0.69 ha in size. Cattle were fed to a average of 590 kg and harvested to obtain carcass measurements. Comparing FEEDLOT vs F+CCDS and PASTURE vs. P+CCDS, FEEDLOT and PASTURE cattle had greater daily DMI and ADG (P<0.05) than did cattle fed F+CCDS and P+CCDS, respectively. Feed conversion during the drylot feeding period favored FEEDLOT over F+CCDS and PASTURE over P+CCDS cattle (P<0.05), and overall FEEDLOT and F+CCDS over PASTURE and P+CCDS cattle (P<0.05). When cattle on PASTURE and P+CCDS treatments were removed from pasture, P+CCDS cattle had gained well over .23 kg/d better than PASTURE cattle. Though this advantage did not carry over into drylot feeding period, this might be a function of daily energy intake while on pasture. Average carcass weights and liver abscesses were not significantly different across the treatments, but differences were found among treatments (P<0.05) for ribeye area (REA), backfat thickness (BF) and kidney, pelvic and heart fat (KPH). The FEEDLOT cattle had larger REA compared with P+CCDS cattle. The BF was greatest in FEEDLOT cattle compared with cattle of the other treatments (P<0.05). A difference existed in quality grade for FEEDLOT vs P+CCDS cattle (P<0.05). However, overall treatment responses for quality grades were similar and within low Choice and Choice grades. The yield grade was not different among the treatments (P>0.05). Using actual costs, cattle fed F+CCDS were most profitable compared with cattle of other treatments (P<0.05). The FEEDLOT treatment was least profitable, and PASTURE and P+CCDS treatments were intermediate and not different from each other (P>0.05). From these results, we can conclude that substituting corn stalks with CCDS in a drylot finishing system is most profitable, furthermore, incorporating pasture into a feedlot finishing system with or without CCDS…

Subjects/Keywords: CCDS; Drylot; Pasture; Steers; Animal Sciences

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Purevjav, T. (2008). Incorporating condensed corn distillers solubles into an integrated pasture and drylot finishing system for feedlot steers. (Thesis). Iowa State University. Retrieved from https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/etd/10887

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Purevjav, Tsengeg. “Incorporating condensed corn distillers solubles into an integrated pasture and drylot finishing system for feedlot steers.” 2008. Thesis, Iowa State University. Accessed April 11, 2021. https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/etd/10887.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Purevjav, Tsengeg. “Incorporating condensed corn distillers solubles into an integrated pasture and drylot finishing system for feedlot steers.” 2008. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Purevjav T. Incorporating condensed corn distillers solubles into an integrated pasture and drylot finishing system for feedlot steers. [Internet] [Thesis]. Iowa State University; 2008. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/etd/10887.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Purevjav T. Incorporating condensed corn distillers solubles into an integrated pasture and drylot finishing system for feedlot steers. [Thesis]. Iowa State University; 2008. Available from: https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/etd/10887

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Kelln, Breeanna Maryella. The effects of winter feeding systems on beef cow performance, soil nutrients, crop yield and system economics.

Degree: 2010, University of Saskatchewan

A study was conducted on an annual cropped field near Lanigan, Saskatchewan over two years (2005-2006, 2006-2007) to evaluate the effects of three extensive winter feeding systems (bale grazing (BG), swath grazing (SG) and straw-chaff grazing (ST-CH)) and one intensive winter feeding system (drylot (DL)) on cow performance, soil nutrients, crop yield and system cost of production. Differences in BW (P Advisors/Committee Members: Lardner, H. A. (Bart).

Subjects/Keywords: drylot; straw-chaff grazing; Balegrazing; ammonium; swathgrazing; nitrate

…traditional drylot feeding system. The winter feeding period for beef cattle (Bos taurus)… …field wintering systems on pasture land, to traditional drylot wintering systems. The study… …The difference between a grazing animal and a drylot animal can lead to substantial… …percent greater energy requirements than those kept in a drylot situation. This is similar to… …18-21% more energy than those maintained in a drylot. NRC (1996) suggests that… 

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kelln, B. M. (2010). The effects of winter feeding systems on beef cow performance, soil nutrients, crop yield and system economics. (Thesis). University of Saskatchewan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-02022010-224418

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kelln, Breeanna Maryella. “The effects of winter feeding systems on beef cow performance, soil nutrients, crop yield and system economics.” 2010. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan. Accessed April 11, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-02022010-224418.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kelln, Breeanna Maryella. “The effects of winter feeding systems on beef cow performance, soil nutrients, crop yield and system economics.” 2010. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Kelln BM. The effects of winter feeding systems on beef cow performance, soil nutrients, crop yield and system economics. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2010. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-02022010-224418.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kelln BM. The effects of winter feeding systems on beef cow performance, soil nutrients, crop yield and system economics. [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-02022010-224418

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.