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University: Northeastern University

You searched for subject:(drug delivery systems). Showing records 1 – 22 of 22 total matches.

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Northeastern University

1. O'Neil, Jacklyn. Controlling drug delivery for the application of extended or sustained-release drug products for parenteral administration.

Degree: MS, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, 2010, Northeastern University

 New therapeutic agents are constantly being developed in order to treat new and current disease states. Many of these new compounds display a narrower therapeutic… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: drug delivery systems; sustained release; extended release; Drugs – Toxicology; Pharmacokinetics – Case studies; Drug delivery systems – Case studies; Chemistry; Medical Biochemistry

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APA (6th Edition):

O'Neil, J. (2010). Controlling drug delivery for the application of extended or sustained-release drug products for parenteral administration. (Masters Thesis). Northeastern University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20000132

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

O'Neil, Jacklyn. “Controlling drug delivery for the application of extended or sustained-release drug products for parenteral administration.” 2010. Masters Thesis, Northeastern University. Accessed June 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20000132.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

O'Neil, Jacklyn. “Controlling drug delivery for the application of extended or sustained-release drug products for parenteral administration.” 2010. Web. 18 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

O'Neil J. Controlling drug delivery for the application of extended or sustained-release drug products for parenteral administration. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Northeastern University; 2010. [cited 2019 Jun 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20000132.

Council of Science Editors:

O'Neil J. Controlling drug delivery for the application of extended or sustained-release drug products for parenteral administration. [Masters Thesis]. Northeastern University; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20000132


Northeastern University

2. Panwar, Rajiv. Reduction of the cardiotoxicity of doxorubicin: demonstration by in vivo imaging with bispecific antibody/radiolabeled negatively charged polymers.

Degree: PhD, School of Pharmacy, 2012, Northeastern University

 ECG and serum CK-MB (creatinine kinase) or cardiac troponin analyses are the routine tests for the diagnosis of myocardial necrosis. Borderline CK-MB elevations and uninterpretable… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Pharmaceutics and Drug delivery systems; Pharmaceutics and Drug Design; Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences

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APA (6th Edition):

Panwar, R. (2012). Reduction of the cardiotoxicity of doxorubicin: demonstration by in vivo imaging with bispecific antibody/radiolabeled negatively charged polymers. (Doctoral Dissertation). Northeastern University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20002959

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Panwar, Rajiv. “Reduction of the cardiotoxicity of doxorubicin: demonstration by in vivo imaging with bispecific antibody/radiolabeled negatively charged polymers.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Northeastern University. Accessed June 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20002959.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Panwar, Rajiv. “Reduction of the cardiotoxicity of doxorubicin: demonstration by in vivo imaging with bispecific antibody/radiolabeled negatively charged polymers.” 2012. Web. 18 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Panwar R. Reduction of the cardiotoxicity of doxorubicin: demonstration by in vivo imaging with bispecific antibody/radiolabeled negatively charged polymers. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Northeastern University; 2012. [cited 2019 Jun 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20002959.

Council of Science Editors:

Panwar R. Reduction of the cardiotoxicity of doxorubicin: demonstration by in vivo imaging with bispecific antibody/radiolabeled negatively charged polymers. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Northeastern University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20002959


Northeastern University

3. Suresh, Megha. In vitro model of inflammatory signaling and cancer stem cell signaling in pancreatic cancer using 3D hetero-cellular spheroids and microRNA delivery using hyaluronic acid-based nanoparticles.

Degree: MS, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2016, Northeastern University

 Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive cancers worldwide with an extremely poor prognosis. There is a largely unmet clinical need for the development… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: co-culture; drug delivery; pancreatic cancer; spheroids; MicroRNA; Therapeutic use; Nanoparticles; Therapeutic use; Drug delivery systems; Hyaluronic acid; Pancreas; Cancer; Treatment

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APA (6th Edition):

Suresh, M. (2016). In vitro model of inflammatory signaling and cancer stem cell signaling in pancreatic cancer using 3D hetero-cellular spheroids and microRNA delivery using hyaluronic acid-based nanoparticles. (Masters Thesis). Northeastern University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20213495

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Suresh, Megha. “In vitro model of inflammatory signaling and cancer stem cell signaling in pancreatic cancer using 3D hetero-cellular spheroids and microRNA delivery using hyaluronic acid-based nanoparticles.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Northeastern University. Accessed June 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20213495.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Suresh, Megha. “In vitro model of inflammatory signaling and cancer stem cell signaling in pancreatic cancer using 3D hetero-cellular spheroids and microRNA delivery using hyaluronic acid-based nanoparticles.” 2016. Web. 18 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Suresh M. In vitro model of inflammatory signaling and cancer stem cell signaling in pancreatic cancer using 3D hetero-cellular spheroids and microRNA delivery using hyaluronic acid-based nanoparticles. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Northeastern University; 2016. [cited 2019 Jun 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20213495.

Council of Science Editors:

Suresh M. In vitro model of inflammatory signaling and cancer stem cell signaling in pancreatic cancer using 3D hetero-cellular spheroids and microRNA delivery using hyaluronic acid-based nanoparticles. [Masters Thesis]. Northeastern University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20213495


Northeastern University

4. Mandapati, Savitri. Preparation and characterization of polymer-multi drug conjugate delivery system for efficient cancer therapy.

Degree: MS, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2010, Northeastern University

 The aim of this study is to prepare and characterize polymer drug-conjugate delivery system loaded with doxorubicin and melphalan for successful passive or active targeting… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: pharmaceutical sciences; cancer therapy; polymer-multi drug conjugate delivery system; Cancer - Treatment; Drug delivery systems; Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences

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APA (6th Edition):

Mandapati, S. (2010). Preparation and characterization of polymer-multi drug conjugate delivery system for efficient cancer therapy. (Masters Thesis). Northeastern University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20000985

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mandapati, Savitri. “Preparation and characterization of polymer-multi drug conjugate delivery system for efficient cancer therapy.” 2010. Masters Thesis, Northeastern University. Accessed June 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20000985.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mandapati, Savitri. “Preparation and characterization of polymer-multi drug conjugate delivery system for efficient cancer therapy.” 2010. Web. 18 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Mandapati S. Preparation and characterization of polymer-multi drug conjugate delivery system for efficient cancer therapy. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Northeastern University; 2010. [cited 2019 Jun 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20000985.

Council of Science Editors:

Mandapati S. Preparation and characterization of polymer-multi drug conjugate delivery system for efficient cancer therapy. [Masters Thesis]. Northeastern University; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20000985


Northeastern University

5. Sun, Linlin. Self-assembled rosette nanotubes for bone tissue engineering and drug delivery applications.

Degree: PhD, College of Engineering. Department of Chemical Engineering, 2014, Northeastern University

 Due to their superior cytocompatible, mechanical, electrical, optical, catalytic, and magnetic properties, nanomaterials (materials with one dimension ≤100 nm) have been investigated intensely for numerous… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Drug delivery; Nanomaterials; Rosette nanotubes; Self-assembly; Biomedical Engineering and Bioengineering; Tissue engineering; Nanostructured materials; Nanotubes; Bones; Growth; Drug delivery systems

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APA (6th Edition):

Sun, L. (2014). Self-assembled rosette nanotubes for bone tissue engineering and drug delivery applications. (Doctoral Dissertation). Northeastern University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20005024

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sun, Linlin. “Self-assembled rosette nanotubes for bone tissue engineering and drug delivery applications.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Northeastern University. Accessed June 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20005024.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sun, Linlin. “Self-assembled rosette nanotubes for bone tissue engineering and drug delivery applications.” 2014. Web. 18 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Sun L. Self-assembled rosette nanotubes for bone tissue engineering and drug delivery applications. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Northeastern University; 2014. [cited 2019 Jun 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20005024.

Council of Science Editors:

Sun L. Self-assembled rosette nanotubes for bone tissue engineering and drug delivery applications. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Northeastern University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20005024


Northeastern University

6. Chernenko, Tatyana. Non-invasive label-free imaging of sub-cellular architecture and intracellular behavior of nano-drug-delivery carriers using Raman micro-spectroscopy.

Degree: PhD, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, 2010, Northeastern University

 Microscopic imaging of sub-cellular architecture provides crucial insight into the details of cellular biology. A widely used technique to image cellular processes is fluorescence microscopy.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Raman micro-spectroscopy; nano-drug-delivery; Raman spectroscopy; Nanochemistry; Drug delivery systems; Biochemistry; Chemical and Pharmacologic Phenomena

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APA (6th Edition):

Chernenko, T. (2010). Non-invasive label-free imaging of sub-cellular architecture and intracellular behavior of nano-drug-delivery carriers using Raman micro-spectroscopy. (Doctoral Dissertation). Northeastern University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20000641

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chernenko, Tatyana. “Non-invasive label-free imaging of sub-cellular architecture and intracellular behavior of nano-drug-delivery carriers using Raman micro-spectroscopy.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Northeastern University. Accessed June 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20000641.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chernenko, Tatyana. “Non-invasive label-free imaging of sub-cellular architecture and intracellular behavior of nano-drug-delivery carriers using Raman micro-spectroscopy.” 2010. Web. 18 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Chernenko T. Non-invasive label-free imaging of sub-cellular architecture and intracellular behavior of nano-drug-delivery carriers using Raman micro-spectroscopy. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Northeastern University; 2010. [cited 2019 Jun 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20000641.

Council of Science Editors:

Chernenko T. Non-invasive label-free imaging of sub-cellular architecture and intracellular behavior of nano-drug-delivery carriers using Raman micro-spectroscopy. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Northeastern University; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20000641


Northeastern University

7. Jain, Shardool. Macrophage targeted tuftsin-modified alginate nanoparticles as non-viral delivery system for anti-inflammatory gene therapy in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

Degree: PhD, School of Pharmacy, 2014, Northeastern University

 The goal of this project is to develop and characterize a macrophage targeted alginate polymer based gene delivery system for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: targeted delivery; Polymeric drug delivery systems; Nanoparticles; Therapeutic use; Gene therapy; Rheumatoid arthritis; Treatment; Rheumatoid arthritis; Animal models; Alginates; Macrophages

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APA (6th Edition):

Jain, S. (2014). Macrophage targeted tuftsin-modified alginate nanoparticles as non-viral delivery system for anti-inflammatory gene therapy in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. (Doctoral Dissertation). Northeastern University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20204485

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jain, Shardool. “Macrophage targeted tuftsin-modified alginate nanoparticles as non-viral delivery system for anti-inflammatory gene therapy in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Northeastern University. Accessed June 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20204485.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jain, Shardool. “Macrophage targeted tuftsin-modified alginate nanoparticles as non-viral delivery system for anti-inflammatory gene therapy in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.” 2014. Web. 18 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Jain S. Macrophage targeted tuftsin-modified alginate nanoparticles as non-viral delivery system for anti-inflammatory gene therapy in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Northeastern University; 2014. [cited 2019 Jun 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20204485.

Council of Science Editors:

Jain S. Macrophage targeted tuftsin-modified alginate nanoparticles as non-viral delivery system for anti-inflammatory gene therapy in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Northeastern University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20204485


Northeastern University

8. Ahmadniaroudsari, Mani. A cyber-physical framework for MRI guided magnetic nano/micro particles.

Degree: MS, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, 2016, Northeastern University

 Recent research based on phantom and clinical studies, has shown that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can be employed to navigate and target drug-loaded magnetic micro… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: magnetic nanoparticle systems; targeted drug delivery; Nanoparticles; Magnetic properties; Drug delivery systems; Simulation methods; Nanomedicine; Magnetic resonance imaging; Magnetic fields; Aggregation (Chemistry)

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APA (6th Edition):

Ahmadniaroudsari, M. (2016). A cyber-physical framework for MRI guided magnetic nano/micro particles. (Masters Thesis). Northeastern University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20194483

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ahmadniaroudsari, Mani. “A cyber-physical framework for MRI guided magnetic nano/micro particles.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Northeastern University. Accessed June 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20194483.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ahmadniaroudsari, Mani. “A cyber-physical framework for MRI guided magnetic nano/micro particles.” 2016. Web. 18 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Ahmadniaroudsari M. A cyber-physical framework for MRI guided magnetic nano/micro particles. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Northeastern University; 2016. [cited 2019 Jun 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20194483.

Council of Science Editors:

Ahmadniaroudsari M. A cyber-physical framework for MRI guided magnetic nano/micro particles. [Masters Thesis]. Northeastern University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20194483


Northeastern University

9. Attarwala, Husain. Multi-compartmental oral delivery systems for silencing intestinal tissue transglutaminase-2 and interleukin-15 genes in the treatment of celiac disease.

Degree: PhD, Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery Program, 2016, Northeastern University

 Celiac disease is caused by an immune response against cereal gluten peptides in the small intestine. The dietary ingestion of gluten triggers a cascade of… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: gelatin nanoparticles; interleukin-15; multi-compartmental delivery systems; oral siRNA delivery; transglutaminase-2; Gene silencing; Small interfering RNA; Drug delivery systems; Transglutaminases; Cytokines; Nanoparticles; Celiac disease; Treatment

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APA (6th Edition):

Attarwala, H. (2016). Multi-compartmental oral delivery systems for silencing intestinal tissue transglutaminase-2 and interleukin-15 genes in the treatment of celiac disease. (Doctoral Dissertation). Northeastern University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20213355

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Attarwala, Husain. “Multi-compartmental oral delivery systems for silencing intestinal tissue transglutaminase-2 and interleukin-15 genes in the treatment of celiac disease.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Northeastern University. Accessed June 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20213355.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Attarwala, Husain. “Multi-compartmental oral delivery systems for silencing intestinal tissue transglutaminase-2 and interleukin-15 genes in the treatment of celiac disease.” 2016. Web. 18 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Attarwala H. Multi-compartmental oral delivery systems for silencing intestinal tissue transglutaminase-2 and interleukin-15 genes in the treatment of celiac disease. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Northeastern University; 2016. [cited 2019 Jun 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20213355.

Council of Science Editors:

Attarwala H. Multi-compartmental oral delivery systems for silencing intestinal tissue transglutaminase-2 and interleukin-15 genes in the treatment of celiac disease. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Northeastern University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20213355


Northeastern University

10. Sawant, Rishikesh Manohar. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a key component of long-circulating delivery systems for therapy and imaging.

Degree: PhD, School of Pharmacy, 2008, Northeastern University

 The undesired side-effects of many therapies and diagnostics result from their accumulation in the non-target tissues. There is a clear need to design pharmaceutical delivery(more)

Subjects/Keywords: Health science; Drug delivery systems; Nanotechnology; Polymeric drug delivery systems; Drug delivery systems; Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences

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APA (6th Edition):

Sawant, R. M. (2008). Polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a key component of long-circulating delivery systems for therapy and imaging. (Doctoral Dissertation). Northeastern University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d1001701x

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sawant, Rishikesh Manohar. “Polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a key component of long-circulating delivery systems for therapy and imaging.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, Northeastern University. Accessed June 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d1001701x.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sawant, Rishikesh Manohar. “Polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a key component of long-circulating delivery systems for therapy and imaging.” 2008. Web. 18 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Sawant RM. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a key component of long-circulating delivery systems for therapy and imaging. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Northeastern University; 2008. [cited 2019 Jun 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d1001701x.

Council of Science Editors:

Sawant RM. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a key component of long-circulating delivery systems for therapy and imaging. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Northeastern University; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d1001701x


Northeastern University

11. Yadav, Sunita. Intranasal delivery for peptide and siRNA to the brain using lipid-based nanocarriers for the treatment of neuroinflammation.

Degree: PhD, School of Pharmacy, 2015, Northeastern University

 Neurodegenerative diseases are the most prevalent brain diseases affecting more than 5.5 million people worldwide. If left unconstrained, 30 years from now, more than 12… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: neurodegenerative diseases; intranasal drug delivery; Intranasal medication; Small interfering RNA; Therapeutic use; Peptides; Therapeutic use; Nervous system; Degeneration; Animal models; Nanomedicine; Drug delivery systems; Blood-brain barrier

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APA (6th Edition):

Yadav, S. (2015). Intranasal delivery for peptide and siRNA to the brain using lipid-based nanocarriers for the treatment of neuroinflammation. (Doctoral Dissertation). Northeastern University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20198907

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Yadav, Sunita. “Intranasal delivery for peptide and siRNA to the brain using lipid-based nanocarriers for the treatment of neuroinflammation.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Northeastern University. Accessed June 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20198907.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Yadav, Sunita. “Intranasal delivery for peptide and siRNA to the brain using lipid-based nanocarriers for the treatment of neuroinflammation.” 2015. Web. 18 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Yadav S. Intranasal delivery for peptide and siRNA to the brain using lipid-based nanocarriers for the treatment of neuroinflammation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Northeastern University; 2015. [cited 2019 Jun 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20198907.

Council of Science Editors:

Yadav S. Intranasal delivery for peptide and siRNA to the brain using lipid-based nanocarriers for the treatment of neuroinflammation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Northeastern University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20198907


Northeastern University

12. Dao, KinhLuan D. Studies in multifunctional drug development: preparation and evaluation of 11β-substituted estradiol-drug conjugates, cell membrane targeting imaging agents, and target multifunctional nanoparticles.

Degree: PhD, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, 2012, Northeastern University

 Cancer is the second leading cause of death after cardiovascular disease in the United States. Despite extensive research in development of antitumor drugs, most of… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Antiestrogen-drug hybrids; bioconjugation chemistry; Multifunctional drug systems; radiolabeling molecules; targeted drug delivery for cancer; targeted PET imaging agents; Chemistry; Medicinal-Pharmaceutical Chemistry

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APA (6th Edition):

Dao, K. D. (2012). Studies in multifunctional drug development: preparation and evaluation of 11β-substituted estradiol-drug conjugates, cell membrane targeting imaging agents, and target multifunctional nanoparticles. (Doctoral Dissertation). Northeastern University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20002742

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dao, KinhLuan D. “Studies in multifunctional drug development: preparation and evaluation of 11β-substituted estradiol-drug conjugates, cell membrane targeting imaging agents, and target multifunctional nanoparticles.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Northeastern University. Accessed June 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20002742.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dao, KinhLuan D. “Studies in multifunctional drug development: preparation and evaluation of 11β-substituted estradiol-drug conjugates, cell membrane targeting imaging agents, and target multifunctional nanoparticles.” 2012. Web. 18 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Dao KD. Studies in multifunctional drug development: preparation and evaluation of 11β-substituted estradiol-drug conjugates, cell membrane targeting imaging agents, and target multifunctional nanoparticles. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Northeastern University; 2012. [cited 2019 Jun 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20002742.

Council of Science Editors:

Dao KD. Studies in multifunctional drug development: preparation and evaluation of 11β-substituted estradiol-drug conjugates, cell membrane targeting imaging agents, and target multifunctional nanoparticles. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Northeastern University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20002742


Northeastern University

13. Teh, James L. Strategic targeting of integrin αVβ3 receptors by multivalent expression of RGD peptidomimetics.

Degree: PhD, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, 2015, Northeastern University

 One of the major problems in targeting cancer cells with either imaging probes or chemotherapeutic agents is non-specific binding and uptake into normal cells. In… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: dendron; gold nanoparticles; integrin receptors; multivalency; peptidomimetics; Integrins; Dendrimers; Nanoparticles; Colloidal gold; Peptides; Synthesis; Ligands (Biochemistry); Drug delivery systems

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APA (6th Edition):

Teh, J. L. (2015). Strategic targeting of integrin αVβ3 receptors by multivalent expression of RGD peptidomimetics. (Doctoral Dissertation). Northeastern University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20195427

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Teh, James L. “Strategic targeting of integrin αVβ3 receptors by multivalent expression of RGD peptidomimetics.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Northeastern University. Accessed June 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20195427.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Teh, James L. “Strategic targeting of integrin αVβ3 receptors by multivalent expression of RGD peptidomimetics.” 2015. Web. 18 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Teh JL. Strategic targeting of integrin αVβ3 receptors by multivalent expression of RGD peptidomimetics. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Northeastern University; 2015. [cited 2019 Jun 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20195427.

Council of Science Editors:

Teh JL. Strategic targeting of integrin αVβ3 receptors by multivalent expression of RGD peptidomimetics. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Northeastern University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20195427


Northeastern University

14. Deshpande, Dipti. Multimodal omega-3 fatty acid oil-containing nanoemulsion-based therapeutic strategy for the treatment of endothelial dysfunction in coronary artery disease.

Degree: PhD, School of Pharmacy, 2014, Northeastern University

 Coronary artery disease has been identified as an important predisposing factor in the development of cardiovascular disorders like myocardial infarction. For years, different hypotheses have… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: lesion; nanoemulsion; vascular; Nanoparticles; Drug delivery systems; Vascular endothelium; Estradiol; Therapeutic use; Arteriosclerosis; Coronary heart disease; Pathophysiology; Nitric oxide

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APA (6th Edition):

Deshpande, D. (2014). Multimodal omega-3 fatty acid oil-containing nanoemulsion-based therapeutic strategy for the treatment of endothelial dysfunction in coronary artery disease. (Doctoral Dissertation). Northeastern University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20196651

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Deshpande, Dipti. “Multimodal omega-3 fatty acid oil-containing nanoemulsion-based therapeutic strategy for the treatment of endothelial dysfunction in coronary artery disease.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Northeastern University. Accessed June 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20196651.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Deshpande, Dipti. “Multimodal omega-3 fatty acid oil-containing nanoemulsion-based therapeutic strategy for the treatment of endothelial dysfunction in coronary artery disease.” 2014. Web. 18 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Deshpande D. Multimodal omega-3 fatty acid oil-containing nanoemulsion-based therapeutic strategy for the treatment of endothelial dysfunction in coronary artery disease. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Northeastern University; 2014. [cited 2019 Jun 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20196651.

Council of Science Editors:

Deshpande D. Multimodal omega-3 fatty acid oil-containing nanoemulsion-based therapeutic strategy for the treatment of endothelial dysfunction in coronary artery disease. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Northeastern University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20196651


Northeastern University

15. Nagelli, Srikar Goud. Development of transferrin targeted NCL-240 micelles and their evaluation using in-vitro 3D cancer cell culture (spheroid) models.

Degree: MS, School of Pharmacy, 2014, Northeastern University

 The main objective of this project was to develop targeted micellar delivery systems of a novel cytotoxic drug (NCL-240; a second generation DM-PIT-1 analog) and… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: cancer; NCL-240; PI3K pathway; spheroids; transferrin targeting; Drug delivery systems; Nanoparticles; Transferrin; Micelles; Cancer cells; Growth; Phosphoinositides

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APA (6th Edition):

Nagelli, S. G. (2014). Development of transferrin targeted NCL-240 micelles and their evaluation using in-vitro 3D cancer cell culture (spheroid) models. (Masters Thesis). Northeastern University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20197620

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nagelli, Srikar Goud. “Development of transferrin targeted NCL-240 micelles and their evaluation using in-vitro 3D cancer cell culture (spheroid) models.” 2014. Masters Thesis, Northeastern University. Accessed June 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20197620.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nagelli, Srikar Goud. “Development of transferrin targeted NCL-240 micelles and their evaluation using in-vitro 3D cancer cell culture (spheroid) models.” 2014. Web. 18 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Nagelli SG. Development of transferrin targeted NCL-240 micelles and their evaluation using in-vitro 3D cancer cell culture (spheroid) models. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Northeastern University; 2014. [cited 2019 Jun 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20197620.

Council of Science Editors:

Nagelli SG. Development of transferrin targeted NCL-240 micelles and their evaluation using in-vitro 3D cancer cell culture (spheroid) models. [Masters Thesis]. Northeastern University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20197620


Northeastern University

16. Raikar, Ankita. HIF-1α activation in 3D tumor spheroids and evaluation of 2-methoxyestradiol therapy using targeted nanoparticle formulations; HIF-1 alpha activation in 3D tumor spheroids and evaluation of 2-methoxyestradiol therapy using targeted nanoparticle formulations.

Degree: School of Pharmacy, 2014, Northeastern University

 Despite significant advances in new drug discoveries and treatment combinations, the mortality rate due to cancer has not changed significantly over the last fifty years… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: 2-methoxyestradiol; HIF-1; ovarian cancer; SKOV-3; spheroids; Polymeric drug delivery systems; Neovascularization inhibitors; Nanoparticles; Anoxemia; Ovaries; Cancer; Treatment; Drug resistance in cancer cells; Transcription factors

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APA (6th Edition):

Raikar, A. (2014). HIF-1α activation in 3D tumor spheroids and evaluation of 2-methoxyestradiol therapy using targeted nanoparticle formulations; HIF-1 alpha activation in 3D tumor spheroids and evaluation of 2-methoxyestradiol therapy using targeted nanoparticle formulations. (Masters Thesis). Northeastern University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20197979

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Raikar, Ankita. “HIF-1α activation in 3D tumor spheroids and evaluation of 2-methoxyestradiol therapy using targeted nanoparticle formulations; HIF-1 alpha activation in 3D tumor spheroids and evaluation of 2-methoxyestradiol therapy using targeted nanoparticle formulations.” 2014. Masters Thesis, Northeastern University. Accessed June 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20197979.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Raikar, Ankita. “HIF-1α activation in 3D tumor spheroids and evaluation of 2-methoxyestradiol therapy using targeted nanoparticle formulations; HIF-1 alpha activation in 3D tumor spheroids and evaluation of 2-methoxyestradiol therapy using targeted nanoparticle formulations.” 2014. Web. 18 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Raikar A. HIF-1α activation in 3D tumor spheroids and evaluation of 2-methoxyestradiol therapy using targeted nanoparticle formulations; HIF-1 alpha activation in 3D tumor spheroids and evaluation of 2-methoxyestradiol therapy using targeted nanoparticle formulations. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Northeastern University; 2014. [cited 2019 Jun 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20197979.

Council of Science Editors:

Raikar A. HIF-1α activation in 3D tumor spheroids and evaluation of 2-methoxyestradiol therapy using targeted nanoparticle formulations; HIF-1 alpha activation in 3D tumor spheroids and evaluation of 2-methoxyestradiol therapy using targeted nanoparticle formulations. [Masters Thesis]. Northeastern University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20197979


Northeastern University

17. Shah, Aalok A. Evaluation of Mucin Glycosylation as a barrier to drug uptake : a quantitative approach.

Degree: MS, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2009, Northeastern University

 Mucins are heavily glycosylated glycoproteins that form a thick layer (glycocalyx) through which all molecules must diffuse to gain access to intracellular targets. They are… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: pharmacy; health sciences; diffusion barrier; drug barrier; Glycosylation; Mucin; Mucin and Chemotherapy; Mucin and Pancreatic cancer; Drug delivery systems; Cancer – Treatment; Mucins – Analysis; Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences

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APA (6th Edition):

Shah, A. A. (2009). Evaluation of Mucin Glycosylation as a barrier to drug uptake : a quantitative approach. (Masters Thesis). Northeastern University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20000236

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Shah, Aalok A. “Evaluation of Mucin Glycosylation as a barrier to drug uptake : a quantitative approach.” 2009. Masters Thesis, Northeastern University. Accessed June 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20000236.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Shah, Aalok A. “Evaluation of Mucin Glycosylation as a barrier to drug uptake : a quantitative approach.” 2009. Web. 18 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Shah AA. Evaluation of Mucin Glycosylation as a barrier to drug uptake : a quantitative approach. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Northeastern University; 2009. [cited 2019 Jun 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20000236.

Council of Science Editors:

Shah AA. Evaluation of Mucin Glycosylation as a barrier to drug uptake : a quantitative approach. [Masters Thesis]. Northeastern University; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20000236


Northeastern University

18. Su, Mei-Ju. Pancreatic cancer cell exosomes-mediated macrophage reprogramming and the role of microRNA transfection using nanoparticle delivery system.

Degree: MS, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2016, Northeastern University

 The main aim of this MS thesis project is to identify the role of human pancreatic cancer cells on functional polarity of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs)… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: exosomes; HA-PEI/HA-PEG; immunotherapy; miRNA; tumor associated macrophages; MicroRNA; Macrophages; Transfection; Tumors; Metabolism; Pancreas; Cancer; Treatment; Drug delivery systems; Nanoparticles

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APA (6th Edition):

Su, M. (2016). Pancreatic cancer cell exosomes-mediated macrophage reprogramming and the role of microRNA transfection using nanoparticle delivery system. (Masters Thesis). Northeastern University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20213442

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Su, Mei-Ju. “Pancreatic cancer cell exosomes-mediated macrophage reprogramming and the role of microRNA transfection using nanoparticle delivery system.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Northeastern University. Accessed June 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20213442.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Su, Mei-Ju. “Pancreatic cancer cell exosomes-mediated macrophage reprogramming and the role of microRNA transfection using nanoparticle delivery system.” 2016. Web. 18 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Su M. Pancreatic cancer cell exosomes-mediated macrophage reprogramming and the role of microRNA transfection using nanoparticle delivery system. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Northeastern University; 2016. [cited 2019 Jun 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20213442.

Council of Science Editors:

Su M. Pancreatic cancer cell exosomes-mediated macrophage reprogramming and the role of microRNA transfection using nanoparticle delivery system. [Masters Thesis]. Northeastern University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20213442


Northeastern University

19. Deshpande, Madhura Sanjay. Palmitoyl ascorbate-modified liposomes for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma.

Degree: PhD, School of Pharmacy, 2014, Northeastern University

 Cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Very limited treatment options exist at present. Nanotechnology has played a major role in cancer… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: palmitoyl ascorbate; Liposomes; Therapeutic use; Drug delivery systems; Protein kinases; Inhibitors; Therapeutic use; Renal cell carcinoma; Treatment; Vitamin C; Therapeutic use; Active oxygen

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APA (6th Edition):

Deshpande, M. S. (2014). Palmitoyl ascorbate-modified liposomes for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma. (Doctoral Dissertation). Northeastern University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20196652

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Deshpande, Madhura Sanjay. “Palmitoyl ascorbate-modified liposomes for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Northeastern University. Accessed June 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20196652.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Deshpande, Madhura Sanjay. “Palmitoyl ascorbate-modified liposomes for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma.” 2014. Web. 18 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Deshpande MS. Palmitoyl ascorbate-modified liposomes for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Northeastern University; 2014. [cited 2019 Jun 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20196652.

Council of Science Editors:

Deshpande MS. Palmitoyl ascorbate-modified liposomes for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Northeastern University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20196652


Northeastern University

20. Essex, Sean. Novel phospholipid-modified-polyethylenimine (PLPEI)-based-nanocarriers for siRNA delivery.

Degree: PhD, School of Pharmacy, 2013, Northeastern University

 This project was designed with a clear aim of developing effective, novel, non-viral siRNA nanocarriers for further application in the treatment of Cancer. Micelle-like nanoparticles… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: lipid; nanocarrier; PEI; polymer; siRNA; Nanoparticles; Therapeutic use; Drug delivery systems; Small interfering RNA; Therapeutic use; Polyethylene; Therapeutic use; Polymers; Therapeutic use; Micelles; Therapeutic use; Breast; Cancer; Treatment

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APA (6th Edition):

Essex, S. (2013). Novel phospholipid-modified-polyethylenimine (PLPEI)-based-nanocarriers for siRNA delivery. (Doctoral Dissertation). Northeastern University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20196782

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Essex, Sean. “Novel phospholipid-modified-polyethylenimine (PLPEI)-based-nanocarriers for siRNA delivery.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Northeastern University. Accessed June 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20196782.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Essex, Sean. “Novel phospholipid-modified-polyethylenimine (PLPEI)-based-nanocarriers for siRNA delivery.” 2013. Web. 18 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Essex S. Novel phospholipid-modified-polyethylenimine (PLPEI)-based-nanocarriers for siRNA delivery. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Northeastern University; 2013. [cited 2019 Jun 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20196782.

Council of Science Editors:

Essex S. Novel phospholipid-modified-polyethylenimine (PLPEI)-based-nanocarriers for siRNA delivery. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Northeastern University; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20196782


Northeastern University

21. Vlerken, Lilian Emilia van. Modulation of multidrug resistance in cancer using polymer blend nanoparticles.

Degree: PhD, School of Pharmacy, 2008, Northeastern University

 The development of multidrug resistance (MDR) to a wide variety of chemotherapeutic agents is one of the most challenging aspects of cancer therapy, and is… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Health Sciences; Nanotechnology; Cancer; Drug resistance in cancer cells; Multidrug resistance; Drug delivery systems; Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences

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APA (6th Edition):

Vlerken, L. E. v. (2008). Modulation of multidrug resistance in cancer using polymer blend nanoparticles. (Doctoral Dissertation). Northeastern University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d10017355

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Vlerken, Lilian Emilia van. “Modulation of multidrug resistance in cancer using polymer blend nanoparticles.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, Northeastern University. Accessed June 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d10017355.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Vlerken, Lilian Emilia van. “Modulation of multidrug resistance in cancer using polymer blend nanoparticles.” 2008. Web. 18 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Vlerken LEv. Modulation of multidrug resistance in cancer using polymer blend nanoparticles. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Northeastern University; 2008. [cited 2019 Jun 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d10017355.

Council of Science Editors:

Vlerken LEv. Modulation of multidrug resistance in cancer using polymer blend nanoparticles. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Northeastern University; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d10017355


Northeastern University

22. Chang, Run. Selective inhibition of osteosarcoma cell functions induced by curcumin-loaded self-assembled arginine-rich-RGD nanospheres.

Degree: MS, College of Engineering. Department of Chemical Engineering, 2014, Northeastern University

 Osteosarcoma is the most frequent primary bone cancer today. Chemotherapy mostly used for the treatment against osteosarcoma can induce high toxicity. Therefore, the objective of… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Arginine-rich; RGD; Selective inhibition; Self-assembly; Biomedical Engineering and Bioengineering; Nanoscience and Nanotechnology; Nanoparticles; Therapeutic use; Drug delivery systems; Technological innovations; Osteosarcoma; Turmeric; Therapeutic use; Peptides; Arginine; Self-assembly (Chemistry)

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APA (6th Edition):

Chang, R. (2014). Selective inhibition of osteosarcoma cell functions induced by curcumin-loaded self-assembled arginine-rich-RGD nanospheres. (Masters Thesis). Northeastern University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20128361

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chang, Run. “Selective inhibition of osteosarcoma cell functions induced by curcumin-loaded self-assembled arginine-rich-RGD nanospheres.” 2014. Masters Thesis, Northeastern University. Accessed June 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20128361.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chang, Run. “Selective inhibition of osteosarcoma cell functions induced by curcumin-loaded self-assembled arginine-rich-RGD nanospheres.” 2014. Web. 18 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Chang R. Selective inhibition of osteosarcoma cell functions induced by curcumin-loaded self-assembled arginine-rich-RGD nanospheres. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Northeastern University; 2014. [cited 2019 Jun 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20128361.

Council of Science Editors:

Chang R. Selective inhibition of osteosarcoma cell functions induced by curcumin-loaded self-assembled arginine-rich-RGD nanospheres. [Masters Thesis]. Northeastern University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20128361

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