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You searched for subject:(dog fear). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Canterbury

1. Swney, Megan. The Effects of Video Self-Modelling on Three Children with Dog Fears.

Degree: School of Health Sciences, 2013, University of Canterbury

The aim of this study was to measure the effects of video self-modelling on three children with dog fears aged between 7 and 13 years old. The study also aimed to teach these three children appropriate dog safety techniques and dog body language identification skills which they could use in everyday life. All three participants were recruited through school newsletters. The three participants attended two meetings with the researcher to discuss their dog fears and what they wanted to achieve from taking part in the study. Videos of each participant were then created to depict the participants being within the same environment as a dog while acting calm and displaying coping skills. Participants were also given hypothetical scenarios of where they may encounter a dog and were asked to rate their fear level. A book was created to teach the participants how to read a dog’s body language and how to behave around dogs. Participants viewed their videos and read their books for two weeks. They then went back to the same setting of the video with a real life dog and were asked to rate their fear levels for the same hypothetical scenarios. Results showed an overall decrease in reported fear levels in two of the three participants, with the third participants showing variable fear levels. It can be concluded that the video along with the book had positive effects on the participants’ fear levels and knowledge about dog behaviour. One major limitation of this study is whether the video or the book alone or a combination of both was responsible for the participants’ results and behaviour changes.

Subjects/Keywords: dog fear; video self modelling; dog safety

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Swney, M. (2013). The Effects of Video Self-Modelling on Three Children with Dog Fears. (Thesis). University of Canterbury. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10092/8307

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Swney, Megan. “The Effects of Video Self-Modelling on Three Children with Dog Fears.” 2013. Thesis, University of Canterbury. Accessed October 13, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10092/8307.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Swney, Megan. “The Effects of Video Self-Modelling on Three Children with Dog Fears.” 2013. Web. 13 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Swney M. The Effects of Video Self-Modelling on Three Children with Dog Fears. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Canterbury; 2013. [cited 2019 Oct 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10092/8307.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Swney M. The Effects of Video Self-Modelling on Three Children with Dog Fears. [Thesis]. University of Canterbury; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10092/8307

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Texas

2. Katz, Morgan. Constructional Fear Treatment for Dogs in Shelters.

Degree: 2016, University of North Texas

Of the approximately 3.9 million dogs that enter US animal shelters each year, many exhibit behaviors related to fear, which can affect their likelihood of adoption. Current dog training procedures to treat fear include counterconditioning and desensitization, which can often take months or years to show any behavior change and do not teach specific behaviors aimed to increase the dog's chance of being adopted. The current study used a negative reinforcement shaping procedure to teach fearful dogs to approach and and interact with people. The results showed that constructional fear treatment increased the amount of time the dog spent at the front of the kennel, and increased sniffing, tail wagging, and accepting petting for all 3 participants. Advisors/Committee Members: Rosales-Ruiz, Jesús, Pinkston, Jonathan, Ingvarsson, Einar.

Subjects/Keywords: Negative reinforcement; shaping; dog; fear

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Katz, M. (2016). Constructional Fear Treatment for Dogs in Shelters. (Thesis). University of North Texas. Retrieved from https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc862823/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Katz, Morgan. “Constructional Fear Treatment for Dogs in Shelters.” 2016. Thesis, University of North Texas. Accessed October 13, 2019. https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc862823/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Katz, Morgan. “Constructional Fear Treatment for Dogs in Shelters.” 2016. Web. 13 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Katz M. Constructional Fear Treatment for Dogs in Shelters. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 2016. [cited 2019 Oct 13]. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc862823/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Katz M. Constructional Fear Treatment for Dogs in Shelters. [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 2016. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc862823/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Kansas State University

3. Wallentine, Kari D. Thunderstorm phobia in dogs.

Degree: MS, Department of Animal Sciences and Industry, 2008, Kansas State University

Canine thunderstorm phobia is a common, frustrating, and complex problem that, due to the often severe nature of the clinical signs, can lead to canine relinquishment to shelters. Although a potentially treatable disorder, existing treatment options have several limitations and variable success rates. Three survey-based studies were conducted to increase the knowledge base for canine thunderstorm phobia. The first study distributed 1445 surveys through 16 Kansas veterinary clinics to determine the prevalence and characteristics of thunderstorm phobic dogs and assess differences between affected and non-affected dogs. Of 463 dogs surveyed, 240 were thunderstorm phobic as assessed by their owners. Severe weather warning systems may play a role in thunderstorm phobia. Thunderstorm phobic dogs were more fearful when exposed to tornado sirens, both during actual storms and siren testing, indicating a possible effect of classical conditioning. No differences were noted regarding sex, breed, pedigree, or neuter status. Most affected dogs preferred to be indoors remaining near their owners. The second study distributed 1600 surveys through eight Kansas animal shelters to determine the prevalence of relinquished dogs with thunderstorm phobia. Other reasons for relinquishment were also assessed. A fear of thunder was among the least common behavioral problems leading to relinquishment in dogs. Only a quarter of owners had visited a veterinarian for assistance with behavioral problems. The third study involved the administration of dog appeasing pheromone (DAP) in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial to assess its efficacy as a sole treatment for thunderstorm phobia. Data was collected from 60 dog owners using behavioral assessment questionnaires. In dogs given the placebo, six behaviors significantly improved, with another eleven showing a numerical trend toward improvement. However, in dogs given DAP, significant improvement was seen in three of these same behaviors. Consequently, these results do not indicate the potential use of DAP for reducing fearful behaviors associated with thunderstorm phobia when compared to negative controls. Information gained from these studies allows veterinarians and behavioral researchers to better understand the extent of this behavioral disorder and hopefully stimulates future research to find new and more effective ways to treat it. Advisors/Committee Members: Janice C. Swanson.

Subjects/Keywords: Dog; Thunderstorm; Relinquishment; Fear; Behavior; Pheromones; Animal Sciences (0475)

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wallentine, K. D. (2008). Thunderstorm phobia in dogs. (Masters Thesis). Kansas State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2097/11975

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wallentine, Kari D. “Thunderstorm phobia in dogs.” 2008. Masters Thesis, Kansas State University. Accessed October 13, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2097/11975.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wallentine, Kari D. “Thunderstorm phobia in dogs.” 2008. Web. 13 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Wallentine KD. Thunderstorm phobia in dogs. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Kansas State University; 2008. [cited 2019 Oct 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2097/11975.

Council of Science Editors:

Wallentine KD. Thunderstorm phobia in dogs. [Masters Thesis]. Kansas State University; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2097/11975

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