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You searched for subject:(dog demographics). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Universiteit Utrecht

1. Geerdes, J.A.C. Dog population characteristics and rabies vaccination coverage at the wildlife interface in the Mpumalanga Province of South Africa.

Degree: 2014, Universiteit Utrecht

Rabies is a zoonotic, rapidly progressive, fatal virus which targets the central nervous system and is mainly transmitted by bites and scratches from domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) acting as the main reservoir of disease. Not only dogs and humans play a role in the dynamics of rabies, it is also known as a disease that is of conservation interest. Wild carnivore populations have been affected by rabies virus over the past 20 years. The design and success of long-term rabies control programs aimed at domestic dogs in developing countries may be affected by many factors such as high density populations and high turnover rates. The objective of this study was to collect data through a household-level census in three rural communities in the sub-district of Bushbuckridge, Mpumalanga Province of South Africa, bordering a large privately-owned conservation area. With this data we aim to assess rabies-vaccination coverage and other factors that might influence the success of the on-going vaccination campaign in the study areas. A descriptive analysis of household characteristics, dog demographics, and contraception demand was performed. A total of 1086 households were interviewed representing a total of 5115 persons and 413 dogs. Dog densities were found to be 169 dogs/km2, 128 dogs/km2, and 133 dogs/km2. We found that the dog:human ratio is 1:11 and 1:15 in the three studied communities. Of all the households included in this study 227 (21%) were DOHH and 863 (79%) of them NOHH. More than 60% of the dogs were found to be free roaming in all three communities. The dog populations were comprised principally of adults (>1 year of age) which made up 52 - 69% of the dog populations in the three communities. The sex ratio of the dog population in all three communities is skewed towards males. The average number of litters in the past twelve months ranged from 1,0-1,3 litter(s), the mean size of the litter was 5,0-5,2 pups and the mortality in the first week after birth 0-45,9%. Neutered dogs (<12%) are not a common finding in any of the three communities. Owners were willing to pay an average of $8 for the 2-year contraception injection. The vaccination coverage range in each of the three communities was 48.6%-57.3%, 68.7%-77.4% and 53.3%-77.8%. We did not detect any significance between confinement characteristics and the vaccination status of dogs in the three communities. Our results show that over 85% of dogs in all three communities were vaccinated during a vaccination campaign where house-to-house visits were carried out. Veterinarians, medical practitioners, and health authorities have the responsibility to apply intersectoral collaboration under the motto of ‘One Health’. We need to strive for a high level of risk perception among dog owners and an increased belief in the benefits of vaccination through public education activities. Proactive and sustainable vaccination programs in the Western World have proven their efficacy in the eradication of domestic dog rabies; this should provide a motivation and a… Advisors/Committee Members: Jongejan, F., Knobel, D..

Subjects/Keywords: Canine; rabies; South Africa; dog demographics; population characteristics; vaccination coverage; wildlife interface

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Geerdes, J. A. C. (2014). Dog population characteristics and rabies vaccination coverage at the wildlife interface in the Mpumalanga Province of South Africa. (Masters Thesis). Universiteit Utrecht. Retrieved from http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/292997

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Geerdes, J A C. “Dog population characteristics and rabies vaccination coverage at the wildlife interface in the Mpumalanga Province of South Africa.” 2014. Masters Thesis, Universiteit Utrecht. Accessed March 04, 2021. http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/292997.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Geerdes, J A C. “Dog population characteristics and rabies vaccination coverage at the wildlife interface in the Mpumalanga Province of South Africa.” 2014. Web. 04 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Geerdes JAC. Dog population characteristics and rabies vaccination coverage at the wildlife interface in the Mpumalanga Province of South Africa. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Universiteit Utrecht; 2014. [cited 2021 Mar 04]. Available from: http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/292997.

Council of Science Editors:

Geerdes JAC. Dog population characteristics and rabies vaccination coverage at the wildlife interface in the Mpumalanga Province of South Africa. [Masters Thesis]. Universiteit Utrecht; 2014. Available from: http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/292997


Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences

2. Sallander, Marie. Diet and activity in Swedish dogs.

Degree: 2001, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences

In this thesis the demographics, diet and activity in a defined population of 460 insured Swedish dogs between 1 and 3 years was presented. The data was collected by using a mail and telephone questionnaire. The repeatability (the questionnaire repeated to the same dog owners) and validity (questionnaire compared to 7-day weighed registration of dietary intake and recording of activity) of the questionnaire were examined, and shown to be good to excellent for most of the parameters measured. Also, the most commonly used commercial dog feeds were analysed, and the results were compared to the declared values and to the recommended nutrient profiles. The insured dogs were shown to be representative for all Swedish dogs of the same age. A typical Swedish dog consumed 75% of the energy intake from commercial feeds, and a smaller part as table foods, but with large variations between individuals. Most of the dogs were fed total diets supplying adequate amounts of the nutrients compared to the recommended nutrient profiles. Total diets that did cause deviations from recommended levels were most commonly those consisting of only table foods (too low levels of vitamins and minerals) or commercial feeds supplied with extra vitamin and mineral supplements (too high levels of vitamins and minerals). The total energy intakes were comparable to previously published studies on maintenance energy requirements of adult dogs, but varied due to sex, breed and weight. Three quarters of the dogs performed some type of activity for one hour or more per day, but although substantial variations were recorded, there was no significant difference in energy intake that could be related to the amount of activity recorded. There was a tendency (P=0.07) that the general temperament of the dog had an influence on the energy intake. The analysed protein and fat content in commercial feeds was on average highly correlated with the declared values and with the recommended nutrient profiles. However, especially the calcium but also other minerals of commercial dog feeds often deviated from declared values, and did not always meet the AAFCO (2000) nutrient profiles. More expensive feeds had the same magnitude of deviation from declared energy and nutrient values as did feeds of a lower cost. This validated questionnaire could be used to collect data on dietary intake and activity in future epidemiological studies in order to quantify the influence of these factors of the effects on health and disease in defined populations of dogs.

Subjects/Keywords: dogs; animal feeding; feeds; proximate composition; physical activity; livestock insurance; sweden; Dog; canine; population; insured; demographics; telephone; questionnaire; survey; weighed record; Sweden; validity; repeatability; diet; feed; food; energy; protein; fat; carbohydrate; vitamin; mineral; activity; exercise; training; health; epidemiology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sallander, M. (2001). Diet and activity in Swedish dogs. (Doctoral Dissertation). Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. Retrieved from http://pub.epsilon.slu.se/1501/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sallander, Marie. “Diet and activity in Swedish dogs.” 2001. Doctoral Dissertation, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. Accessed March 04, 2021. http://pub.epsilon.slu.se/1501/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sallander, Marie. “Diet and activity in Swedish dogs.” 2001. Web. 04 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Sallander M. Diet and activity in Swedish dogs. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences; 2001. [cited 2021 Mar 04]. Available from: http://pub.epsilon.slu.se/1501/.

Council of Science Editors:

Sallander M. Diet and activity in Swedish dogs. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences; 2001. Available from: http://pub.epsilon.slu.se/1501/

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