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You searched for subject:(distributed scaffolding). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Georgia State University

1. Wass, Todd W, Ed.D. STUDENTS’ EXPERIENCES OF DESIGN THINKING AND DISTRIBUTED SCAFFOLDING IN A MIDDLE SCHOOL SOCIAL STUDIES CLASSROOM.

Degree: Doctor of Education (EdD), Middle and Secondary Education, 2018, Georgia State University

Recently, design thinking as a method to solve ill-defined problems has increased in middle school curricula. In this qualitative case study consisting of 23 participants in seven middle school student groups, this study sought to understand how students experienced and responded to design thinking and distributed scaffolding as students navigated a design challenge of creating a public art installation honoring a person or group that promoted human rights. Additionally, this research sought to explain how the distributed scaffolding embedded within each phase of design thinking further aided students in their learning and work production. This study reported how design thinking promoted critical thinking and problem solving, how students experienced and responded to distributed scaffolds that were placed into curriculum units to help students reflect, how students demonstrated social studies skill and content knowledge, and how students worked through real-world human-centered problems towards a viable solution. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Caroline C. Sullivan, Dr. Michelle Zoss, Dr. Jonathan Cohen.

Subjects/Keywords: Design thinking; Distributed scaffolding; Students’ experience; Social studies; Middle school

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wass, Todd W, E. D. (2018). STUDENTS’ EXPERIENCES OF DESIGN THINKING AND DISTRIBUTED SCAFFOLDING IN A MIDDLE SCHOOL SOCIAL STUDIES CLASSROOM. (Thesis). Georgia State University. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/mse_diss/50

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wass, Todd W, Ed D. “STUDENTS’ EXPERIENCES OF DESIGN THINKING AND DISTRIBUTED SCAFFOLDING IN A MIDDLE SCHOOL SOCIAL STUDIES CLASSROOM.” 2018. Thesis, Georgia State University. Accessed May 22, 2019. https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/mse_diss/50.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wass, Todd W, Ed D. “STUDENTS’ EXPERIENCES OF DESIGN THINKING AND DISTRIBUTED SCAFFOLDING IN A MIDDLE SCHOOL SOCIAL STUDIES CLASSROOM.” 2018. Web. 22 May 2019.

Vancouver:

Wass, Todd W ED. STUDENTS’ EXPERIENCES OF DESIGN THINKING AND DISTRIBUTED SCAFFOLDING IN A MIDDLE SCHOOL SOCIAL STUDIES CLASSROOM. [Internet] [Thesis]. Georgia State University; 2018. [cited 2019 May 22]. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/mse_diss/50.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Wass, Todd W ED. STUDENTS’ EXPERIENCES OF DESIGN THINKING AND DISTRIBUTED SCAFFOLDING IN A MIDDLE SCHOOL SOCIAL STUDIES CLASSROOM. [Thesis]. Georgia State University; 2018. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/mse_diss/50

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Texas A&M University

2. Shimek, Christina. The Effectiveness of Scaffolding Treatment on College Students' Epistemological Reasoning about how Data are Used as Evidence.

Degree: 2012, Texas A&M University

College students rarely engage model-based epistemological reasoning about scientific data and evidence. The purpose of this study was to (1) investigate how scaffolding treatments influenced college students' epistemological reasoning about how data are used as evidence, (2) describe students' epistemological reasoning practice over the course of the study, (3) learn more about relationships among students' domain knowledge, epistemological beliefs about scientific knowledge, and epistemological reasoning, and (4) investigate how scaffolding for epistemological reasoning influences knowledge gain. Participants in this study consisted of three-hundred fifteen undergraduate students; all were juniors and seniors and all students were enrolled in one of two introductory genetics laboratory courses. Study participants included non-majors (Experiment 1, N =143) and majors (Experiment 2, N = 172). A partially mixed-methods sequential research design was used in this study; qualitative and quantitative phases were mixed during data analysis. A distributed scaffolding system was used in this study. All participants from each laboratory section were randomly assigned to one of three treatments; no scaffolds, domain-general scaffolds, or domain specific scaffolds. Study variables included domain knowledge, epistemological beliefs about the nature of scientific knowledge, and epistemological reasoning, scaffolding treatment was the manipulated variable. Findings were: (1) Chi square analysis indicated no statistically significant differences in epistemological reasoning by scaffolding treatment; model-based reasoning was not observed in students' explanations; (2) Spearman rho indicated no change in epistemological reasoning over the course of the study, however, statistical significance was not reached, however, a repeated measures ANOVA with Greenhouse-Geisser correction indicated a statistically significant within subjects change in epistemological reasoning, implications are discussed; (3) statistically significant bivariate correlations were found and (4) ANCOVA indicated pretest domain knowledge was a statistically significant covariate for posttest domain knowledge and a statistically significant main effect for scaffolding treatment was reached by Experiment 1 participants but not by Experiment 2 participants. Implications for instructional design and future research are discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Goetz, Ernest T. (advisor), Loving, Cathleen C. (advisor), Hall, Robert J. (committee member), Wild, James R. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: distributed scaffolding; domain-general scaffolds; domain-specific scaffolds; epistemological reasoning; college science

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Shimek, C. (2012). The Effectiveness of Scaffolding Treatment on College Students' Epistemological Reasoning about how Data are Used as Evidence. (Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2012-05-10957

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Shimek, Christina. “The Effectiveness of Scaffolding Treatment on College Students' Epistemological Reasoning about how Data are Used as Evidence.” 2012. Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed May 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2012-05-10957.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Shimek, Christina. “The Effectiveness of Scaffolding Treatment on College Students' Epistemological Reasoning about how Data are Used as Evidence.” 2012. Web. 22 May 2019.

Vancouver:

Shimek C. The Effectiveness of Scaffolding Treatment on College Students' Epistemological Reasoning about how Data are Used as Evidence. [Internet] [Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2012. [cited 2019 May 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2012-05-10957.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Shimek C. The Effectiveness of Scaffolding Treatment on College Students' Epistemological Reasoning about how Data are Used as Evidence. [Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2012-05-10957

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Oulu

3. Laru, J. (Jari). Scaffolding learning activities with collaborative scripts and mobile devices.

Degree: 2012, University of Oulu

Abstract The use of mobile devices, including mobile phones and tablets, is a growing trend in education. The practice has been widely technology driven and often justified simply by the importance of using new technology in a classroom and by claiming such devices to be important in reaching something referred to, although not that well defined, as 21st century skills. This thesis is one answer to the challenge represented by this development. It brings together theoretical ideas of scaffolding learning with collaborative scripts and the use of mobile devices as cognitive tools in a real life educational settings. This thesis has constructivist grounds and aims at exploring how to support collaborative learning when students have ill-structured problems and their activities are supported with mobile technologies. The study consists of three case studies, which together form an example of how important it is to design, develop and deliver lightweight digital tools and activities for learners to construct knowledge. Overall, the results of three case studies in this thesis confirms that it is a dubious assumption that learners will automatically take appropriate and measured advantage of the affordances of mobile devices and other emergent technologies involved in cognitive activities: rather, these cognitive tools require deliberate attention and effort from learners to make use of the affordances of the tools. Furthermore, results from the case studies reveal that personal factors such as students’ prior knowledge and their metacognitive and collaborative skills, as well as contextual cues such as cultural compatibility and instructional methods, influence student engagement.

Tiivistelmä Mobiililaitteiden, kuten puhelinten ja tabletien, opetuskäyttö lisääntyy hyvää vauhtia. Aihepiiri on ollut teknologiavetoinen, opetuskäyttöä on perusteltu lähinnä tarkemmin määrittelemättömillä 2000-luvun kansalaistaidoilla (21th century skills) ja uuden teknologian hyödyntämisen tärkeydellä. Tämä väitöskirja on teoreettisesti ja metodologisesti perusteltu vastine tähän keskusteluun. Tutkimus yhdistää pedagogista vaiheistamista ja kognitiivisia työkaluja käsittelevän teoreettisen viitekehyksen kolmeen todellisissa oppimistilanteissa tehtyyn kokeiluun. Työ koostuu kolmesta tapaustutkimuksesta, jotka yhdessä muodostavat esimerkin kuinka mobiililaitteiden avulla tuettua opiskelua voidaan suunnitella ja toteuttaa erilaisissa konteksteissa. Ensimmäisessä tapaustutkimuksessa tutkittiin maantieteellisesti hajautuneen opetusta suunnittelevan yhteisön vuorovaikutusta. Toisessa tapaustutkimuksessa selvitettiin kuinka tukea luontopolkutyöskentelyä mobiilisovellusten avulla. Kolmannessa tapaustutkimuksessa tutkittiin yliopisto-opiskelijoiden opintojen tukemista mobiilin sosiaalisen median sovelluksia hyödyntäen. Kolme tapaustutkimusta osoittavat että oppilaiden ei voida olettaa automaattisesti osaavan hyödyntää uusinta teknologiaa ja pedagogisia menetelmiä opiskelunsa tukena. Päinvastoin, käyttäminen vaatii opiskelijoilta paljon…

Advisors/Committee Members: Järvelä, S. (Sanna).

Subjects/Keywords: case study; cognitive tools; collaborative learning; collaborative scripts; distributed cognition; mobile learning; scaffolding; mobiililaitteet; pedagoginen suunnittelu; tutkiva oppiminen; yhteisöllinen oppiminen

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Laru, J. (. (2012). Scaffolding learning activities with collaborative scripts and mobile devices. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Oulu. Retrieved from http://urn.fi/urn:isbn:9789514299407

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Laru, J (Jari). “Scaffolding learning activities with collaborative scripts and mobile devices.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Oulu. Accessed May 22, 2019. http://urn.fi/urn:isbn:9789514299407.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Laru, J (Jari). “Scaffolding learning activities with collaborative scripts and mobile devices.” 2012. Web. 22 May 2019.

Vancouver:

Laru J(. Scaffolding learning activities with collaborative scripts and mobile devices. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Oulu; 2012. [cited 2019 May 22]. Available from: http://urn.fi/urn:isbn:9789514299407.

Council of Science Editors:

Laru J(. Scaffolding learning activities with collaborative scripts and mobile devices. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Oulu; 2012. Available from: http://urn.fi/urn:isbn:9789514299407

.