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You searched for subject:(distinct population segment). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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West Virginia University

1. Kessinger, Brin E. Utilizing conservation genetics as a strategy for recovering the endangered Candy Darter (Etheostoma osburni) in West Virginia.

Degree: MS, Wildlife and Fisheries Resources, 2020, West Virginia University

The Candy Darter (Etheostoma osburni) is a small freshwater fish native to the New River drainage in West Virginia and Virginia that was listed as endangered in November 2018. It has been extirpated from much of its historic range in West Virginia, restricting it to the Gauley and Greenbrier river drainages. In addition to extirpations, the species is threatened by introgressive hybridization with the invasive Variegate Darter (E. variatum). Previous research primarily focused on hybridization, but population genetic analyses were limited. Population genetic analyses aim to identify distinct populations through genetic structure and characterize the levels of genetic diversity amongst those populations. A series of reintroductions of wild-caught individuals from the Greenbrier River drainage was performed to create new populations that were not under threat of hybridization. Fish were stocked into Camp Creek and the Little Bluestone River in the Bluestone River drainage of southern West Virginia. Individuals from throughout the Greenbrier and Gauley River drainages along with the newly introduced individuals were genotyped with 12 microsatellite loci to assess their population structure and diversity. These results were used to make recommendations about conservation units and future reintroduction efforts. A watershed-level landscape assessment was performed on the Camp Creek and Little Bluestone River watersheds to compare the source habitat to the new habitat. There is strong evidence that the Greenbrier drainage population and the Gauley River drainage population are highly distinct and represent separate ESUs that should be treated as separate Recovery Units (RUs). The reintroduced population’s genetic diversity captures the diversity of the source (Greenbrier drainage), but the landscapes of the new watersheds present some challenges to managers with higher levels of agriculture, resource extraction, and private land. The long-term persistence of E. osburni populations relies on continued monitoring and management of their genetics. Advisors/Committee Members: Amy Welsh, Stuart Welsh, Jacquelyn Strager.

Subjects/Keywords: population genetics; conservation units; reintroduction; translocation; hybridization; invasive; Distinct Population Segment; Evolutionarily Significant Unit; Etheostoma; Biology

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APA (6th Edition):

Kessinger, B. E. (2020). Utilizing conservation genetics as a strategy for recovering the endangered Candy Darter (Etheostoma osburni) in West Virginia. (Thesis). West Virginia University. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.33915/etd.7670 ; https://researchrepository.wvu.edu/etd/7670

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kessinger, Brin E. “Utilizing conservation genetics as a strategy for recovering the endangered Candy Darter (Etheostoma osburni) in West Virginia.” 2020. Thesis, West Virginia University. Accessed March 07, 2021. https://doi.org/10.33915/etd.7670 ; https://researchrepository.wvu.edu/etd/7670.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kessinger, Brin E. “Utilizing conservation genetics as a strategy for recovering the endangered Candy Darter (Etheostoma osburni) in West Virginia.” 2020. Web. 07 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Kessinger BE. Utilizing conservation genetics as a strategy for recovering the endangered Candy Darter (Etheostoma osburni) in West Virginia. [Internet] [Thesis]. West Virginia University; 2020. [cited 2021 Mar 07]. Available from: https://doi.org/10.33915/etd.7670 ; https://researchrepository.wvu.edu/etd/7670.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kessinger BE. Utilizing conservation genetics as a strategy for recovering the endangered Candy Darter (Etheostoma osburni) in West Virginia. [Thesis]. West Virginia University; 2020. Available from: https://doi.org/10.33915/etd.7670 ; https://researchrepository.wvu.edu/etd/7670

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Montana

2. Cross, Patrick. POPULATION DIFFERENTIATION AND HABITAT SELECTION OF A MONTANE RED FOX POPULATION IN THE GREATER YELLOWSTONE ECOSYSTEM.

Degree: MS, 2015, University of Montana

Montane red fox (Vulpes vulpes) populations across the western United States are genetically and morphologically distinct from foxes at lower elevations. These montane populations also share a preference for subalpine forest habitats. One hypothesis is that they stem from boreal forest-associated ancestors that expanded during the Pleistocene when boreal forests extended farther south than they do today. Forest habitat selection may therefore aid the persistence of native populations surrounded by non-native conspecifics. Alternatively, this behavior may be an avoidance mechanism in response to competition with larger coyotes (Canis latrans), or a product of the fox's natural adaptability. The red fox population at high elevations in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) displays distinctive genetic and morphological characteristics, while it also lives in an environment without resident coyotes. I used genetic analyses to test hypotheses on the origin of this population and to examine population structure and gene flow across the GYE to investigate whether the high elevation population constitutes a discrete and significant population. I also used habitat selection analyses to examine forest habitat selection in this environment and test hypotheses of what may drive this behavior. I found that the GYE serves as a refugium for native red fox genetics, and that forest habitats play a critical role in the life histories of montane fox populations, especially since they hold important food resources used by red foxes such as whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) seeds. But selection of edge habitats was likewise strong. That suggests that resource scarcity and the need to access a variety of habitats with a variety of resources may be as much of or more important of a driver of habitat selection as are intrinsic preferences or competitive pressures. This project was an application of systems ecology studying how the evolution of a landscape affects the evolution of a species. It analyzed data relocations in an animal's movement path to the millennia between glaciations in a geological epoch. Its output benefits the scientific understanding of evolutionary ecology, the management and conservation of native species, and the general public's appreciation of ecology and natural resources. It also addresses whether the population could be considered a distinct population segment under the U.S. Endangered Species Act.

Subjects/Keywords: Fox; Yellowstone; Beartooth; Distinct Population Segment; Native; Whitebark Pine; Biodiversity; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Integrative Biology; Systems Biology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cross, P. (2015). POPULATION DIFFERENTIATION AND HABITAT SELECTION OF A MONTANE RED FOX POPULATION IN THE GREATER YELLOWSTONE ECOSYSTEM. (Masters Thesis). University of Montana. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/4560

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cross, Patrick. “POPULATION DIFFERENTIATION AND HABITAT SELECTION OF A MONTANE RED FOX POPULATION IN THE GREATER YELLOWSTONE ECOSYSTEM.” 2015. Masters Thesis, University of Montana. Accessed March 07, 2021. https://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/4560.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cross, Patrick. “POPULATION DIFFERENTIATION AND HABITAT SELECTION OF A MONTANE RED FOX POPULATION IN THE GREATER YELLOWSTONE ECOSYSTEM.” 2015. Web. 07 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Cross P. POPULATION DIFFERENTIATION AND HABITAT SELECTION OF A MONTANE RED FOX POPULATION IN THE GREATER YELLOWSTONE ECOSYSTEM. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Montana; 2015. [cited 2021 Mar 07]. Available from: https://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/4560.

Council of Science Editors:

Cross P. POPULATION DIFFERENTIATION AND HABITAT SELECTION OF A MONTANE RED FOX POPULATION IN THE GREATER YELLOWSTONE ECOSYSTEM. [Masters Thesis]. University of Montana; 2015. Available from: https://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/4560


Brigham Young University

3. Janetski, David J. Genetic Considerations for the Conservation and Management of Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvieri) in Yellowstone National Park.

Degree: MS, 2006, Brigham Young University

A key component to conservation is an accurate understanding of genetic subdivision within a species. Despite their ecological and economic importance, relatively little is understood about the genetic structuring of Yellowstone cutthroat trout in Yellowstone National Park. Here, we use traditional (Fst, Rst, Nm, and AMOVA) and modern (Bayesian assignment tests, coalescent theory, and nested clade analysis) analytical approaches to describe the population genetic subdivision of cutthroat trout spawning populations in Yellowstone Lake and to identify genetically distinct population segments throughout Yellowstone National Park. Evidence for restricted gene flow between spawning populations within Yellowstone Lake was detected using nested clade analysis. This is the first molecular evidence for restricted gene flow between spawning populations in Yellowstone Lake. In contrast, traditional methods such as Fst and Rst as well as the Bayesian clustering program STRUCTURE v2.0 failed to detect evidence for restricted gene flow. Across our sampling range within Yellowstone National Park, eleven genetically distinct cutthroat trout population segments were detected. These showed a general pattern of small, isolated populations with low genetic diversity in headwater streams and wide-spread, genetically diverse populations in higher-order rivers. We recommend populations be managed to maintain current levels of genetic diversity and gene flow. Based on the recent decline of and distinct morphological, behavioral, and genetic nature of cutthroat trout in Yellowstone Lake, we recommend the Yellowstone Lake spawning populations collectively be recognized as an evolutionarily significant unit.

Subjects/Keywords: Yellowstone cutthroat trout; Yellowstone National Park; conservation; population genetics; fisheries; distinct population segment; Fst; nested clade analysis; Biology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Janetski, D. J. (2006). Genetic Considerations for the Conservation and Management of Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvieri) in Yellowstone National Park. (Masters Thesis). Brigham Young University. Retrieved from https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1944&context=etd

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Janetski, David J. “Genetic Considerations for the Conservation and Management of Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvieri) in Yellowstone National Park.” 2006. Masters Thesis, Brigham Young University. Accessed March 07, 2021. https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1944&context=etd.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Janetski, David J. “Genetic Considerations for the Conservation and Management of Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvieri) in Yellowstone National Park.” 2006. Web. 07 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Janetski DJ. Genetic Considerations for the Conservation and Management of Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvieri) in Yellowstone National Park. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Brigham Young University; 2006. [cited 2021 Mar 07]. Available from: https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1944&context=etd.

Council of Science Editors:

Janetski DJ. Genetic Considerations for the Conservation and Management of Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvieri) in Yellowstone National Park. [Masters Thesis]. Brigham Young University; 2006. Available from: https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1944&context=etd

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